News

Legislation Would Increase Time for Especially Aggravated Burglary

Sen. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, introduced on Monday legislation to increase the amount of time served for those convicted of especially aggravated burglary. Those convicted of the crime would be ineligible for parole to ensure no less than 85 percent of the sentence is served. “This is when someone breaks into your home and beats you," Kelsey said. "The idea that these violent offenders could be eligible for release after a few years for a crime that will affect his or her victims for the rest of their lives is astounding." Read more from The Chattanoogan.

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Sen. Corker Earned Millions More than Previously Disclosed

The Tennessean reports Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn, earned millions more from investments than he previously disclosed. Corker’s office outlined “technical errors” in a letter sent Friday to the secretary of the Senate. The amended financial disclosures include new sources of income and higher minimum amounts for the potential value of the senator’s income and transactions. “I am extremely disappointed in the filing errors that were made in earlier financial disclosure reports, and after completing a full, third-party review, we have corrected this oversight,” Corker said in a statement.

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State Rep. Requested Leniency in Child Porn Case

House Majority Whip Jeremy Durham, R-Franklin, asked a federal judge for a lenient sentence for a former youth pastor convicted of possessing child porn. The Associated Press reports that Joseph Todd Neill, who previously worked at North Fork Baptist Church in Shelbyville, was sentenced to more than three years in prison. A grand jury last week declined to indict Durham on prescription fraud charges.

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Sen. Kelsey Questions Legality of Metro's Gun Show Ban

Sen. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, is questioning the constitutionality of a recent decision by the Nashville Metropolitan Fair Commissioners Board to ban gun shows from publicly owned fairgrounds. Kelsey, who said the ban also violates Tennessee and Metro laws, requested an opinion on Thursday from Attorney General Herbert Slatery. Read more from The Collierville Independent

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Grand Jury Declines to Investigate Rep. Durham

A Williamson County grand jury declined to pursue an investigation of state House Majority Whip Jeremy Durham, R-Franklin, on prescription fraud charges, The Tennessean reports. A drug task force recommended last year indicting Durham after a 2013 incident in which agents alleged Durham tried to fill an outdated prescription. “This situation is from two and a half years ago and was fully vetted by 12 Williamson County citizens who quickly agreed that nothing illegal occurred,” Durham said Wednesday in a statement.

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New Tennessee Laws Set to Go Into Effect in 2016

On Jan. 1, 2016, a new batch of laws will take effect. Here is a list of all of the Public Chapters in Tennessee that take effect starting in the New Year.

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New Public Chapters Take Effect Jan. 1, 2016

Here's the list of new Public Chapters in Tennessee that will become effective on Jan. 1, 2016. 

Chapter 48, (SB0847): Taxes, Exemption and Credits - As enacted, for purposes of receiving a sales tax exemption, increases, from 15 days to 30 days, the period of time within which a helicopter, airplane, or related equipment purchased by a nonresident must be removed outside of Tennessee. - Amends TCA Section 67-6-313.

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McDonough Confirmed by Senate as U.S. District Judge

Travis Randall McDonough was confirmed 89-0 today by the U.S. Senate as U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Tennessee. McDonough was nominated to fill the vacancy created by Judge Curtis Collier, who took senior status on Oct. 31, 2014. He previously served as counselor and chief of staff for Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke. Two other Tennessee District Court nominees – Edward Stanton III and Waverly Crenshaw Jr. – have won Judiciary Committee approval for the West and Middle Districts, respectively, but are still awaiting a Senate vote.

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Bill Would Require Candidates to Share Credit Scores

Two House Republicans are asking Tennessee candidates to demonstrate their budgeting abilites through a new piece of legislation that would require all candidates to publicly release their credit scores. The "Voter Accountability and Transparency Act," sponsored by Rep. Cameron Sexton, R-Crossville, and Sen. Paul Bailey, R-Sparta, would change state law to require financial statements filed by candidates to include credit scores. "Before an election, candidates constantly say how they are going to balance the budget and make sure government lives within its means," Sexton said. "How do voters verify whether the candidate means what they say? The only accurate answer is to know the person’s credit score." Read more from The Tennesean.

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State's 'Fetal Assault Law' to Expire in 2016

Tennessee’s “fetal assault law”, which charges pregnant mothers with assault for babies exposed to drugs, is set to expire next year. WCYB reports Sullivan County District Attorney Barry Staubus is working to keep the law. "It is the incentive (mothers) need that otherwise they would not have gotten into a program, except for the fact if you don't get into a program, you could be charged,” he said. State Rep. Jon Lundberg, R-Bristol, said he expects lawmakers to renew the law.

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Ruling Could Alter the Division of Electoral Districts

Two voters in Texas are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to alter the way Texas and every other state divides electoral districts. The plaintiffs argue states should count only people who are eligible to vote and not include non-citizens and children in the population. The Associate Press reports that a ruling in their favor would shift more power to rural areas and away from urban areas where there is a higher population of immigrants and children. "The plaintiffs in Texas are interested in stemming the growth of Latino political power," argued Thomas Saenz, president and general counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense Fund.

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Online CLE Courses on Drafting Legislation

Online training is now available on drafting legislation. Drafting Legislation Parts 1 & 2: Bills and Drafting Legislation Part 3: Amendments offer insight on how legislation is prepared, drafted and reviewed.

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New Nashville Federal Courthouse Likely to be Funded

Money for a new Nashville federal courthouse will likely be included in appropriation bills being negotiated now in Congress, The Tennessean reports. In order for the funding --  a $182 million project cost -- to be included in the package, Congress must vote and pass the bundle ahead of next Friday’s deadline. President Obama will also have to sign it into law. “While we can’t be sure until next week, I am optimistic that the Senate and the House will agree to fully fund the Nashville federal courthouse," said U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn. The TBA’s support for the project dates to 2002 when members voted overwhelmingly to recommend that the courthouse be sited on a block bounded by 7th and 8th Avenues and Church and Commerce Streets in Nashville.

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Supreme Court Amends the Code of Judicial Conduct

Responding to suggestions from the TBA and a committee of judges , the Tennessee Supreme Court today amended the provisions of the Code of Judicial Conduct regarding judges and judicial candidates’ election campaign conduct. Among other changes, the rules now make it more clear that judges and judicial candidates are permitted to endorse other judges; explicitly allow judges to seek, accept or use endorsements from any person or organization; permit judges to speak on behalf of his or her candidacy through any medium, including but not limited to advertisements, websites, or other campaign literature; and, clarify the prohibition on judges simultaneously seeking judicial and non juridical office. The TBA made recommendations for four changes based upon the experience with the new rules during the 2014 election. As urged by the TBA, the Court did not change the standard for disqualification based on campaign contributions or support, and it turned back changes to the treatment of affiliation with organizations that practice invidious discrimination. Read the order here

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Criminal Justice Issues on the Forefront of Presidential Race

The Associated Press highlights how criminal justice issues are “intruding” on the 2016 presidential race. Policing, drug crimes, sentencing changes and prison costs are among topics on which candidates are seeking to differentiate themselves. "You don't have everyone saying they're tough on crime," Inimai Chettiar of the Brennan Center for Justice in New York said. "Instead, you have people offering different policy solutions."

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Rep. Wilburn to Resign from Legislature

Somerville lawyer and Republican state Rep. Leigh Wilburn said today that she will leave the Tennessee General Assembly on Dec. 31. Wilburn, a freshman who replaced Rep. Barrett Rich after he retired in 2014, said she is stepping down "due to unforeseen circumstances involving my immediate and extended family and my business." Humphrey on the Hill has the news.

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State Seeks to Dismiss Students’ Voter ID Lawsuit

A lawsuit brought by a group of students against the state’s voter identification law has stalled as a federal judge considers whether the case has merit. The students argue that state law discriminates based on age because it does not allow use of student IDs to vote. The state has asked U.S. District Judge Aleta Trauger to dismiss the case. The Daily News Journal reports that Trauger has directed both sides to stop exchanging evidence or acting on subpoenas while she weighs the arguments.

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Administrative Med Mal Scheme Discussed

The Medical Malpractice Study Committee of the Senate Commerce & Labor Committee met today to consider SB507 by Sen. Jack Johnson (HB546 by Rep. Glen Casada), which moves medical malpractice claims out of the court system into a Patients’ Compensation System, relieves physicians of personal malpractice liability, and sets up an independent medical review panel of physicians and medical experts to review plaintiffs' claims. Presenting the legislation were representatives of the group Patients For Fair Compensation. Those in opposition and raising concerns included the Tennessee Medical Association and State Volunteer Mutual Insurance Company. Legislators attending today’s meeting included Sen. Jack JohnsonSen. Mark GreenSen. Reginald TateRep. Glen CasadaRep. Dennis PowersRep. Joe PittsRep. David Shepard and Rep. Kelly Keisling. Check TBAImpact for updates on this issue.

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Haslam Wants to Strengthen Laws for Abortion Providers

In a letter issued last week to state lawmakers, Gov. Bill Haslam revealed, according to the Knoxville News Sentinel, the Department of Health recently conducted unannounced inspections of the state’s four largest abortion providers to ensure they are in compliance with all laws and regulations. It is against Tennessee law to sell fetal tissues, but there are no laws in place requiring abortion providers to report on the disposal methods. In the letter, Haslam wrote that he intends to “prevent the abhorrent activities discussed in the Planned Parenthood videos from occurring in Tennessee.” The governor also wrote he would be proposing legislation in January "to strengthen accountability and transparency for surgery centers performing abortions."

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Haslam Ranked as One of Most Popular Governors

Gov. Bill Haslam recently received a 64 percent approval rating in a survey of 1,442 registered Tennessee voters, the Daily News Journal reports. Morning Consult, an online polling publication, says the Republican governor ranks 7th among all governors. “Haslam is one of the most popular governors in the country, which in this day and age is quite a feat for someone who's run twice for statewide office,” James Wyatt, Morning Consult's director of polling, said in a statement. 

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U.S. Attorney Bill Killian to Resign

William C. Killian, the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Tennessee, announced today he is resigning and plans to join a national law firm, the Times Free Press reports. "I am humbled by the honor and experience of serving with my fellow U.S. district attorneys throughout the country," Killian said in a statement. "None of the accomplishments would have been possible without the cooperation and coordination of various local, state and federal agencies." Killian’s last day will be Dec. 5.

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Top GOP Lawmaker Wants Syrian Refugees Out of Tennessee

House GOP Caucus Chairman Glen Casada, R-Franklin, wants to activate the Tennessee National Guard to round up any Syrian refugees who have recently settled in the state and block any other additional Syrians from entering Tennessee, The Tennessean reports. "I’m not worried about what a bureaucrat in D.C. or an unelected judge thinks. ... We need to gather (Syrian refugees) up and politely take them back to the ICE center and say, 'They’re not coming to Tennessee, they’re yours’,” Casada said. Some lawmakers are seeking a special legislative session to look at the issue. Read more on Tennessee lawmakers and the resettlement debate

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Mothers Share Experiences With State's Fetal Assault Law

NPR reports on Tennessee’s new “fetal assault” law, which punishes pregnant women who abuse drugs. The article features two mothers: one who sought help for her addiction because of the law and another who says the law scared her away from seeking pre-natal care.

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Sen. Corker Receives History Makers Award in Chattanooga

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker today received the Chattanooga History Center’s 2015 History Makers Award, Nooga reports. The award included a portrait bust of the Republican senator. "I loved my days at Chattanooga City High School … and being mayor of this city was the greatest honor of my life. I loved it more than you can imagine,” Corker said.

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Haslam Wants to Suspend Placement of Syrian Refugees in Tennessee

Gov. Bill Haslam says he is asking the federal government to “suspend” the placement of Syrian refugees in Tennessee, The Times Free Press reports. "We are currently working to get specifics from the U.S. Department of State on the status of any Syrian refugees currently slated to come to Tennessee," Haslam said in a statement issued following Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey, R-Blountville, and House Speaker Beth Harwell, R-Nashville, request to block placements of Syrian refugees in Tennessee. However, USA Today reports governors have little power to stop refugees from entering states.

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