News

October Issue Features Justice Wade's New Role

Learn about Justice Gary Wade as he leaves the Tennessee Supreme Court to take the helm as dean of the Duncan School of Law at Lincoln Memorial University in the October issue of the Tennessee Bar Journal. It is CELEBRATE PRO BONO MONTH and for that author Russell Fowler looks at one former U.S. president who came back as a senior lawyer in a heroic way, representing the Africans aboard the Amistad in 1839.

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TBJ Contains 50 Years of Wise Words

This month’s 50th Birthday feature, "Timeless Wisdom," reminds readers of the wise words the Tennessee Bar Journal has published over the years. For instance: "To be a competent lawyer, one must first be a competent human being" (Val Sanford, 1984); "The practice of law is not similar in any respect to professional wrestling" (Penny White, 1994); "We will be strong and forceful advocates, but in a manner which does not destroy our professionalism, our collegiality and our effectiveness" (Bob Ritchie, 1998); and "Retention of women in the private practice of law is attainable, but will require change" (Karen Neal and Cynthia Sellers, 2009). There's a lot more where that came from -- read this story and the full issue online.

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State's New Business Court, Design Patent Law Featured

The new issue of the Tennessee Bar Journal is out today, featuring everything you need to know about Tennessee’s new Business Court. Chief Justice Sharon Lee and Justin Seamon give you the details. Also, get up to speed on the design patent awards under "Apple v. Samsung” in an article by Nashville lawyers James M. Starling, Seth R. Ogden and Ryan D. Levy. Find out what else is in the September issue.

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50 Years of Travel, Plus Columns on Wills, Banking, Uber

To celebrate the Journal’s 50th birthday, travel back through some of the exotic trips the TBA has taken over the years -- Rome, Mexico, the Caribbean and more. This month, columnist Eddy Smith asks (and answers) the question, "Strictly Speaking, When Is a Will Not a Will?" and in her column, Kathryn Reed Edge gives an overview of interest rates. Humor columnist Bill Haltom suggests a slight career concept change … to Uber Attorney. See the entire August Journal here.

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50th Birthday: Wish You Were Here

Back in the ’60s and ’70s, the Tennessee Bar Association did a lot of traveling, offering cruises and other trips just for fun and to promote comraderie. Now the TBA generally meets within the state although its convention has in years past ventured to Asheville, North Carolina, and Destin, Florida. CLE Ski began in 1985 with classes being offered near the slopes of Utah and later, Colorado, and is still going strong.

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50th Birthday: Wish You Were Here

Back in the ’60s and ’70s, the Tennessee Bar Association did a lot of traveling, offering cruises and other trips just for fun and to promote comraderie. Now the TBA generally meets within the state although its convention has in years past ventured to Asheville, North Carolina, and Destin, Florida. CLE Ski began in 1985 with classes being offered near the slopes of Utah and later, Colorado, and is still going strong.

read more »

50th Birthday: Wish You Were Here

Back in the ’60s and ’70s, the Tennessee Bar Association did a lot of traveling, offering cruises and other trips just for fun and to promote comraderie. Now the TBA generally meets within the state although its convention has in years past ventured to Asheville, North Carolina, and Destin, Florida. CLE Ski began in 1985 with classes being offered near the slopes of Utah and later, Colorado, and is still going strong.

read more »

Strictly Speaking, When Is a Will Not a Will?

“Close don’t count in baseball. Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades.”
– Hall of Fame baseball player Frank Robinson[1]


When is a will not a will, even when the testator, witnesses and drafting lawyer intend it to be a will? When the statutory requirements for execution are not strictly followed. The Tennessee Court of Appeals recently reiterated that point in In re Estate of Morris.[2] The opinion should lead lawyers to check their will forms and clients’ existing wills to make sure they comply with the statute of wills.

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Strictly Speaking, When Is a Will Not a Will?

“Close don’t count in baseball. Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades.”
– Hall of Fame baseball player Frank Robinson[1]


When is a will not a will, even when the testator, witnesses and drafting lawyer intend it to be a will? When the statutory requirements for execution are not strictly followed. The Tennessee Court of Appeals recently reiterated that point in In re Estate of Morris.[2] The opinion should lead lawyers to check their will forms and clients’ existing wills to make sure they comply with the statute of wills.

read more »

Strictly Speaking, When Is a Will Not a Will?

“Close don’t count in baseball. Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades.”
– Hall of Fame baseball player Frank Robinson[1]


When is a will not a will, even when the testator, witnesses and drafting lawyer intend it to be a will? When the statutory requirements for execution are not strictly followed. The Tennessee Court of Appeals recently reiterated that point in In re Estate of Morris.[2] The opinion should lead lawyers to check their will forms and clients’ existing wills to make sure they comply with the statute of wills.

read more »

Bank On It: Interest Rates 101

Ask any commercial lawyer or banker about interest rates, and you are likely to get a mixture of inappropriate language, confusion and resignation. Interest rates are complicated. How they are figured sometimes belies all reason, and why you can’t find the various rates all in one place in the Tennessee Code is a mystery.

“Interest rate” is defined as the annualized cost of credit or debt capital computed as the percentage ratio of interest to the principal.

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Bank On It: Interest Rates 101

Ask any commercial lawyer or banker about interest rates, and you are likely to get a mixture of inappropriate language, confusion and resignation. Interest rates are complicated. How they are figured sometimes belies all reason, and why you can’t find the various rates all in one place in the Tennessee Code is a mystery.

“Interest rate” is defined as the annualized cost of credit or debt capital computed as the percentage ratio of interest to the principal.

read more »

Bank On It: Interest Rates 101

Ask any commercial lawyer or banker about interest rates, and you are likely to get a mixture of inappropriate language, confusion and resignation. Interest rates are complicated. How they are figured sometimes belies all reason, and why you can’t find the various rates all in one place in the Tennessee Code is a mystery.

“Interest rate” is defined as the annualized cost of credit or debt capital computed as the percentage ratio of interest to the principal.

read more »

But Seriously, Folks! Your Uber Attorney Is 2 Minutes Away

As a busy lawyer, I spend a great deal of my life either up in the air or down on the road. At least a couple of times a month, I make sure my seatbelt is buckled and my seat back and tray table are in their full, locked, upright position as I fly off in pursuit of justice. Well, actually I’m just going to take a deposition, but that’s all a part of the pursuit of justice, isn’t it?

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But Seriously, Folks! Your Uber Attorney Is 2 Minutes Away

As a busy lawyer, I spend a great deal of my life either up in the air or down on the road. At least a couple of times a month, I make sure my seatbelt is buckled and my seat back and tray table are in their full, locked, upright position as I fly off in pursuit of justice. Well, actually I’m just going to take a deposition, but that’s all a part of the pursuit of justice, isn’t it?

read more »

But Seriously, Folks! Your Uber Attorney Is 2 Minutes Away

As a busy lawyer, I spend a great deal of my life either up in the air or down on the road. At least a couple of times a month, I make sure my seatbelt is buckled and my seat back and tray table are in their full, locked, upright position as I fly off in pursuit of justice. Well, actually I’m just going to take a deposition, but that’s all a part of the pursuit of justice, isn’t it?

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TBJ: Microscopic Hair, Queen Caroline and TBA Awards

The erroneous use of microscopic hair comparison is examined by Journal columnist Wade Davies, in the July issue. Columnist Russell Fowler tells the story of the incorrigible Queen Caroline and her equally despicable husband, King George IV. He describes their divorce as a "lawyer's dream case ... the grounds and defense were salacious allegations of adultery." And in this installment of celebrating the Journal's 50 years, take a look at the many awards the Tennessee Bar Association gives every year, notably the Justice Joe Henry Award for Outstanding Legal Writing.

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Stay or Pay: When Criminal Offenders Can't Pay Fines

In the July issue of the Tennessee Bar Journal, out today, the Hon. Walter Kurtz writes about the incarceration of minor criminal offenders when the offense is the inability to pay fines and fees. Also, when can you compensate a fact witness? Craig P. Sanders and Brandon J. Stout explain. In Bill Harbison's first column as Tennessee Bar Association president, he writes about the many ways lawyers give their time to champion justice for others.

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TBA Honors 2 Nashville Lawyers for Outstanding Legal Writing

Jennifer Lacey, John Williams awarded annual honor

NASHVILLE, June 29, 2015 – Nashville lawyers Jennifer J. Lacey and John P. Williams were awarded the Tennessee Bar Association’s Justice Joe Henry Award for Outstanding Legal Writing at the association’s annual meeting in Memphis this month.

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Columnists Hold High Standard for 'Journal' Writing

In this issue, columnist John Day shares some facts about Tennessee Tort Cases; Marlene Moses and Ben Russ explain orders of protection; and Bill Haltom writes why lawyers should “go out for lunch and home for dinner.” In the year-long commemoration of the Journal’s 50 years, this installment looks back over all the columns and the impact they have made on readers, including the 10 men and women who write in substantive areas today. Especially do not miss the granddaddy of them all, the column that started in 1965 with the pressing subject, "The Telephone: Friend of Foe."

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TBJ Includes Fiduciaries, Constitutional Convention of 1870

In the May issue, Nashville lawyer Scott Pilkinton examines the question of whether or not a felon can be a fiduciary. Turns out, it’s not an easy answer. Chattanooga lawyer and former TBA President Sam Elliott looks at "the two great issues" of the state's Constitutional Convention of 1870 and how it is still relevant today.

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Steen: Magna Carta is Basis for Freedoms Today

In the May Tennessee Bar Journal, President Jonathan Steen writes about celebrating Law Day by remembering Magna Carta on its 800th anniversary. The American Bar Association has many resources about Magna Carta, the precursor to the rights and freedoms afforded Americans under the U.S. Constitution. Among many helpful links and publications: a webcast, "The Great Charter: What Makes Magna Carta Mythic?" with U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Stephen G. Breyer, and "The Magna Carta Chronicle: A Young Person's Guide to 800 Years in the Fight for Freedom."

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Steen: Bridge the Generation Gap With Clear Communication

In his Tennessee Bar Journal column about how different generations communicate, TBA President Jonathan Steen points out how important good communication skills are -- and why sending a text late at night to a senior partner may not be the best way to make contact. In the April issue's other columns, Eddy Smith covers IRA beneficiaries and creditor protection; Katy Edge explains how banking works for legal marijuana sales; and Bill Haltom comments on Justice Ginsburg’s recent nap before the president’s speech.

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April Journal Has Insider's View to High Court

This month the Journal takes an inside look at the Tennessee Supreme Court, by former staff attorney Marshall L. Davidson III. Davidson, now presiding judge at the Workers' Compensation Appeals Board, writes about "unexpected discoveries about the justices, lawyers who appear before them, and pitfalls to avoid in navigating our state’s appellate judiciary." Also, read about the good work through restorative justice that Tennessee Youth Courts are doing, as well as who the TBA Young Lawyers' Division CASA Volunteer of the Year is. April is Child Abuse Prevention Month; learn more about related CASA events and resources. It's no April Fool -- you can read the April issue here.

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TBJ This Month: Andrew Jackson, 50-Year-Olds and Harper Lee

This month in the Tennessee Bar Journal, Russell Fowler's column, "History's Verdict" examines Andrew Jackson's tenure on the Tennessee Supreme Court. And as the magazine continues to celebrate the Journal’s 50th birthday all year long, this month read about some Tennessee lawyers who were born at the same time and what law-related changes have taken place in their lifetimes. Yes, these lawyers turn 50 this year and are not afraid to admit it. Smile along with humor columnist Bill Haltom in his excitement over Harper Lee’s newly discovered sequel to To Kill a Mockingbird.

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