Disciplinary Actions

Reinstated

The following attorneys have been reinstated to the practice of law after complying with Supreme Court Rule 21, which requires mandatory continuing legal education: Harvey Louis Goodman, Knoxville; Wendell Lloyd, San Francisco.

The following attorneys have been reinstated to the practice of law after complying with Section 20 of Supreme Court Rule 9, which requires the payment of annual registration fees: Don Michael Roman, Stone Mountain, Ga.; Jeffrey Dotson Seidman, Memphis; Wendy Ann Stanfield, Chattanooga; Jeffrey Lamont Warfield, Saipan, MP; Rebecca Miller Warfield, Saipan, MP.

Censured

A censure declares conduct improper but does not limit the right to practice law.
  
Brentwood attorney Charles G. Blackard III was publicly censured by the Board of Professional Responsibility on Feb. 13. The censure was based on his actions in two separate domestic relations cases. In both cases, Blackard failed to keep clients informed and failed to respond to reasonable requests for information. He also failed to make reasonable efforts to expedite the cases and failed to respond to requests for information by the Board of Professional Responsibility. For these actions, the board determined that Blackard violated Rules of Professional Conduct 1.3, 1.4, 3.2, 8.1 and 8.4(a)(d).

The Board of Professional Responsibility censured Gainesboro lawyer William L. Draper on Feb. 14 for engaging in inappropriate representation. A petition for discipline was filed against Draper by the board on May 23, 2006. On Nov. 17, 2006, a hearing panel entered a default judgment and determined a censure should be imposed. The panel found that Draper's conduct in pursuing an interest against a former client violated the Rules of Professional Conduct since the matter was substantially related to his representation of the former client. His actions, according to the board, violated Rules of Professional Conduct 1.6(a), 1.7(a)(b), 1.9 and 8.4(c)(d). In addition to imposing the censure, the board ordered Draper to pay $2,172.40 to cover the cost and expenses of the disciplinary proceeding. Draper did not seek review of the hearing panel's decision.

Suspended

Suspension is effective 10 days after issuance, except where immediate suspension is necessary to protect the public. A suspended lawyer may not accept new clients but may continue representing current clients for 30 days. The lawyer must notify all clients, co-counsel and opposing counsel of the suspension order; return to clients any papers or property to which they are entitled; not use the indicia of lawyer, legal assistant or law clerk; and not maintain a presence where the practice of law is conducted. An attorney suspended for one year or more must prove by clear and convincing evidence that he has the moral qualifications, competency and learning required for admission to the practice of law, and that resumption of his practice would not be detrimental to the integrity and standing of the bar or the administration of justice, nor be subversive to the public interest. An attorney suspended for less than one year with conditions may resume practice after complying with those conditions. An attorney suspended for less than one year with no conditions may resume practice without reinstatement.
  
On Jan. 29, the Supreme Court summarily and temporarily suspended the license of Kingston lawyer Spence R. Bruner for failing to comply with a Tennessee Lawyers Assistance Monitoring Agreement. Supreme Court Rule 9, Section 4.3 provides for the immediate summary suspension of an attorney's license in cases of failure to substantially comply with a monitoring agreement. The suspension remains in effect until dissolved or modified by the court.

The Tennessee Supreme Court temporarily suspended the law license of Jackson attorney Linda Sesson Taylor on Feb. 1. The Board of Professional Responsibility had petitioned the court to impose the suspension based on Taylor's failure to respond to a complaint of ethical misconduct. The action was taken pursuant to Section 4.3 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9.

On Feb. 12, the Tennessee Supreme Court temporarily suspended the law license of Glenn Erikson after he pleaded guilty to one count of wire fraud affecting a financial institution in violation of 18 USC Section 1343. The court also ordered the Board of Professional Responsibility to institute a formal proceeding to determine the final discipline to be imposed. The suspension remains in effect until dissolved or amended by the court. The action was taken pursuant to Section 14 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9.

Court of Judiciary Action

The Court of Judiciary issued a public reprimand Feb. 19 to Springfield General Sessions Judge Burton D. Glover for two violations of state campaign finance law and two instances of misrepresenting factual information. During his 1998 campaign, and again during the 2006 campaign, Glover accepted a corporate contribution of more than $1,000. State law prohibits corporate donations as well as contributions over $1,000. When notified of the violation, Glover refunded the contributions. The court also reprimanded Glover for campaign advertising in 2006 that knowingly misrepresented his accomplishments and suggested that another judge was habitually absent from court. Glover accepted the reprimand.