Disciplinary Actions

Reinstated

Knoxville attorney Steven Lee Williams was reinstated to the practice of law by order of the Tennessee Supreme Court on Aug. 25. He was temporarily suspended on July 31 for failing to respond to a complaint of misconduct.  

The following attorneys have been reinstated to the practice of law after complying with Section 20 of Supreme Court Rule 9, which requires the payment of annual registration fees:
Le'Dell Sanders Joiner, Las Vegas, Nev.
Ungyong Kim, St. Louis, Mo.
Heather Kirksey, Memphis
John Ryan, Germantown
John Craig Shiffman, Glen Echo, Md.
Courtney Trombly, Washington, D.C.

Murfreesboro lawyer Tony Lawrence Maples paid the 2009 registration fee and associated penalties, which has resulted in the lifting of a suspension imposed on Aug. 14 for nonpayment of BPR fees. However, he remains suspended for failure to comply with CLE requirements.  

Suspended

Memphis lawyer Michael E. Latimore was temporarily suspended on Sept. 1 for failing to respond to a disciplinary complaint of ethical misconduct.

On Sept. 16, the state Supreme Court temporarily suspended the law license of Dyersburg lawyer Martin Lynn Howie for failing to respond to a complaint of ethical misconduct.

The Tennessee Supreme Court temporarily suspended the law license of Johnson City attorney Alex Vanburen on Sept. 21 for failing to respond to a complaint of ethical misconduct.

On Sept. 22, the Supreme Court suspended Knoxville lawyer Aubrey Lewis Davis for one year for failing to file a brief in a case before the Criminal Court of Appeals and for being held in contempt by the court. However, the Supreme Court allowed all time to be served on probation if Davis complies with several conditions. First, he must engage a practice monitor to review his office practices on a monthly basis. The court instructed the practice monitor to focus on client communications, fee agreements and the timeliness of case-related tasks. In addition, Davis must remain compliant with his Tennessee Lawyers Assistance Program agreement and pay the cost of the disciplinary proceeding. The court stipulated that failure to comply with these terms could result in revocation of probation and imposition of suspension for the remainder of the period. Davis agreed to a conditional guilty plea in which he accepted the one-year suspension. The court also agreed to dissolve a prior temporary suspension against Davis that was in effect at the time he was suspended for the contempt matter. The court found that his actions violated Rules of Professional Conduct 1.3, 1.16, 3.2, 3.3(a)(1) and 8.4.

Disbarred

On Aug. 18, Jocelyn D. Mims of Sumner County was disbarred by the Tennessee Supreme Court after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to introduce contraband into a penal facility and one count of criminal attempt to introduce contraband into a penal facility. The court found her to be in violation of Rule of Professional Conduct 8.4 and ordered her to pay the costs of the disciplinary proceeding. She may not resume practice until reinstated by the court.