Licensure & Discipline

Reinstated

The following attorneys have been reinstated to the practice of law after complying with Section 20 of Supreme Court Rule 9, which requires the payment of annual registration fees to the Board of Professional Responsibility:
Kathleen Lynn Chambers, San Ramon, Calif.
Anthony William Desmond, Knoxville
John Michael Moody II, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

The following attorneys have been reinstated to the practice of law after complying with Section 20 of Supreme Court Rule 9, which requires the payment of annual registration fees to the Board of Professional Responsibility, and Supreme Court Rule 43, which requires certification that a lawyer’s funds are held in an account participating in the Interest on Lawyers’ Trust Accounts (IOLTA) program:
William Lynn Campbell Jr., Nashville
Sally French Paulson, Memphis
Jesse Frank Randle, Germantown

Brian K. Roberts of Fairbanks, Alaska, was reinstated to the practice of law on May 30 after complying with Supreme Court Rule 21, which requires mandatory continuing legal education.

Knoxville lawyer David A. Lufkin Sr. was reinstated to the practice of law on May 15. He had been suspended in 2009, retroactive to October 2006. On Aug. 25, 2011, Lufkin filed a petition for reinstatement. The Supreme Court granted his request but also imposed a requirement that he engage a practice monitor for one year and pay the costs of the proceeding.

Nashville lawyer Parrish B. Stanton was reinstated to the practice of law on May 22. He was suspended on Oct. 14, 2010, for 18 months, retroactive to 2009. The reinstatement requires that he pay restitution; attend support groups with the Tennessee Lawyers Assistance Program twice a month for one year; acquire 10 of the required continuing legal education hours in the subject area of criminal law; engage a practice monitor for one year; and pay the costs of the reinstatement proceeding.

Disciplinary

Censured
Nashville lawyer Colin Michael Daly was publicly censured by the Tennessee Supreme Court on May 22 for practicing law while his license was administratively suspended after he failed to timely pay his annual registration fees. The court determined that his actions violated Rule 5.5 of the Rules of Professional Conduct.

Knoxville lawyer Lisa Anne Temple was publicly censured on May 25 after the state Supreme Court found that she accepted representation of a client while she was suspended from practicing law. In addition, the court found that she made misrepresentations to the client about whether she had filed the client’s divorce. Temple submitted a conditional guilty plea and agreed to the censure. Her actions were found to have violated Rules of Professional Conduct 1.4, 1.5, 5.5, 8.1 and 8.4(a)(c) and (d).

Suspended
The Supreme Court of Tennessee temporarily suspended the law license of Mark Kelley Braswell on May 22 for his failure to respond to a complaint of ethical misconduct. Braswell is licensed in Tennessee but maintains an office in Washington, D.C. The suspension remains in effect until dissolution or modification by the court.