Licensure & Discipline

DISABILITY INACTIVE

The law licenses of the following Tennessee attorneys were transferred to disability inactive status. They may not practice law while on disability inactive status, but may petition the court for reinstatement by showing by clear and convincing evidence that the disability has been removed and they are fit to resume the practice of law:

Davidson County lawyer Charles Powell Jackson III, Jan. 5
Davidson County lawyer Jere Robert Lee, Jan. 15
Giles County lawyer Richard H. Dunavant, Jan. 21

DISCIPLINARY

Censured
The Tennessee Supreme Court publicly censured Williamson County lawyer Casey Coleman Truelove on Jan. 6. The court took the action after Truelove obtained the notary stamp of an associate attorney in her office and notarized a pleading and signed the associate’s name to the notarization without the associate’s authority. Truelove filed the pleading with the court and concluded the case before it was discovered what she had done. Her conduct violates Rules of Professional Conduct 3.3 and 8.4(c).

Jeffery Lamont Warfield, who is licensed to practice law in Tennessee but has been living and practicing law in Guam, was publicly censured by the state Supreme Court on Jan. 8. The Supreme Court of Guam publicly reprimanded Warfield on Sept. 4, 2015, for diligence, competence and communication issues related to the representation of two clients in criminal cases.  

On Jan. 25, Loudon County lawyer Arthur Wayne Henry was publicly censured by the state Supreme Court after Henry in 2012 failed to take reasonable steps to move a case forward. Based on his inaction, the defendants moved to dismiss for failure to prosecute in January. Henry did not file a response to the motion to dismiss and failed to appear when the motion was heard in March 2015. Henry violated Rules of Professional Conduct 1.1, 1.3, 1.4 and 3.2.

Barry Keith Maxwell, a Monroe County lawyer, was publicly censured by the Tennessee Supreme Court on Jan. 28. On Aug. 19, 2015, Maxwell’s law license was suspended for failing to comply with continuing legal education requirements. Maxwell continued to practice law from Aug. 20, 2015 through Sept. 28, 2015 while his license was suspended. His actions violated Rules of Professional Conduct 5.5.

Maury County lawyer R. W. Hardison was publicly censured by the state Supreme Court on Jan. 28. The court found that in September 2014, Hardison’s communication with his clients and diligence in handling his clients’ case significantly declined. After being discharged by the clients, he failed to promptly surrender the clients’ file.  Additionally, Hardison continued working in his law office and performing legal activities in October 2014 despite the fact that he had been suspended for failing to comply with continuing legal education requirements. His actions violated Rules of Professional Conduct 1.3, 1.4, 1.16 and 5.5.

Suspended
The Tennessee Supreme Court temporarily suspended Putnam County lawyer John Philip Parsons on Jan. 21 from the practice of law upon finding Parsons failed to respond to the Board regarding a complaint of misconduct. Parsons was immediately precluded from accepting any new cases and was required to cease representing existing clients by Feb. 20. This suspension remains in effect until dissolution or modification by the Supreme Court.

Campbell County lawyer Wesley Lynn Hatmaker was temporarily suspended from the practice of law on Jan. 29 by the Tennessee Supreme Court after the court found Hatmaker had misappropriated funds and poses a threat of substantial harm to the public. Hatmaker was immediately precluded from accepting any new cases, and was required to cease representing existing clients by Feb. 28. This suspension remains in effect until dissolution or modification by the Supreme Court.

On Dec. 28, The Tennessee Supreme Court suspended Brentwood attorney Connie Lynn Reguli from the practice of law for 11 months and 29 days. The court found that Reguli failed to return client communications, refund unearned fees, provide an accounting of fees to a former client and the Board of Professional Responsibility and that her website contained false statements. The court determined that these actions violated Rules of Professional Conduct 1.4, 1.5, 1.16, 7.4, 8.1 and 8.4. Reguli and the Board appealed the panel’s judgment to the Williamson County Circuit Court, which modified the panel’s decision by reducing the length of suspension, altering and eliminating various conditions of probation, and ordering Reguli to pay restitution to a former client. Reguli and the board appealed to the Supreme Court; the court unanimously affirmed on Dec. 28 the trial court’s order of restitution but otherwise reinstated the hearing panel’s decision.

On Jan. 7, Franklin County lawyer Joseph Scott Bean Jr. was suspended by the state Supreme Court from the practice of law for four years, retroactive to July 3, 3014. Bean was summarily suspended on July 3, 2014, based upon his guilty plea to a serious crime; i.e., theft in an amount over $10,000. The court found that his actions violated Rules of Professional Conduct 8.4(a) (b) (c) (d).

The Tennessee Supreme Court suspended Garry Christopher Forsythe of Sumner County on Jan. 12 from the practice of law following his guilty plea to a serious crime; i.e., wire fraud. The Supreme Court ordered the board to institute a formal proceeding to determine the extent of final discipline to be imposed following Forsythe’s guilty plea.

The law license of Davidson County lawyer William Caldwell Hancock was suspended on Jan. 15 for one year and ordered to pay restitution in the total amount of $22,126 as a condition of reinstatement. The suspension was effective Jan. 25. A hearing panel determined Hancock made allegations in a suit that were not based upon a reasonable inquiry into the law or facts of the matter. It was also determined that Hancock filed the suit with the purpose to embarrass and burden a third person. Hancock appealed the decision of the hearing panel to the Chancery Court then to the Tennessee Supreme Court; however, his appeal was dismissed because of his failure to timely pay the litigation tax. His actions violated Rules of Professional Conduct 3.1, 4.4(a), 8.4(a) and (d). Hancock will receive credit for 54 days of the suspension which he had already served.

Disbarred
The state Supreme Court disbarred David Sicay-Perrow, an Atlanta-based attorney licensed to practice in Tennessee, on Jan. 26. The court took the action after Sicay-Perrow received funds on two occasions that were intended for a client. Sicay-Perrow was suspended by the the court on Aug. 19, 2015, for failing to comply with continuing legal education requirements and remains so suspended. The court found that his actions violated Georgia Rules of Professional Conduct 1.15(I)a, 1.15(II)b, 1.15(III)a, 5.3a and 8.4a.

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