Licensure & Discipline

Administrative Suspensions Online Notice of attorneys suspended for, and reinstated from, administrative violations — including failure to pay the Board of Professional Responsibility fee, file the IOLTA report, comply with continuing legal education requirements and pay the Tennessee professional privilege tax — is now available exclusively on the TBA website.

Visit http://www.tba.org/directory-listing/administrative-suspension-lists to see administrative suspensions imposed since 2006.

Disability Inactive
The law license of Vera J. T. Alexander was transferred to disability inactive status on May 23, pursuant to Section 27.3 of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9. Alexander cannot practice law while on disability inactive status. She may return to the practice of law upon showing evidence that the disability has been removed.

The law license of Susan Quinn Deese was transferred to disability inactive status on May 23. Deese cannot practice law while on disability inactive status. She may return to the practice of law after reinstatement by the Tennessee Supreme Court upon showing of clear and convincing evidence that the disability has been removed and she is fit to resume the practice of law.

The law license of Knox County lawyer Pamela K. Kelly was transferred to disability inactive status on May 8. Kelly cannot practice law while on disability inactive status, but may return after showing clear evidence that the disability has been removed.

DISCIPLINARY

Suspended
The Tennessee Supreme Court suspended Robert Allen Doll III from the practice of law on May 31. Doll was suspended after being found guilty by a jury of subornation of aggravated perjury and criminal simulation. The Supreme Court ordered the Board of Professional Responsibility to institute a formal proceeding to determine the extent of final discipline to be imposed as a result of Doll being found guilty.

The Tennessee Supreme Court suspended Montgomery County lawyer Peter M. Napolitano, effective June 3, from the practice of law for five years, with probation after one year. He must employ the use of a practice monitor pursuant to Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9, Section 12.9 (2016) to supervise compliance with trust accounting rules and accounting procedures. Napolitano is also required to perform 100 hours of public service work for each year his suspension is probated.


Compiled by Katharine Heriges from information provided by the Board of Professional Responsibility of the Tennessee Supreme Court. Licensure and disciplinary notices are included in this publication as a member service. The official record of an attorney’s status is maintained by the board. Current information about a particular attorney may be found on the board’s website at www.tbpr.org/consumers/attorneysearch.

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