People

John R. Tarpley, a shareholder at Lewis King Kreig & Waldrop in Nashville, has been named chair of the editorial board for the American Bar Association Journal. Tarpley, a former president of the Tennessee Bar Association as well as its Young Lawyers Division, will assume the role in August for a three-year term.

Wimberly Lawson Wright Daves & Jones PLLC has added Jeffrey M. Cranford to its Morristown office as senior attorney. His practice focuses on civil litigation matters, including representing small and large businesses and municipalities in employment, workers’ compensation, general liability matters and commercial transactions. He also practices in the areas of insurance defense, real estate and domestic relations. He received his law degree from the University of Memphis in 1999.

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz recently added a number of associate attorneys to its Tennessee offices. In Chattanooga, Jamie Leigh Morton, a 2012 graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Law, handles a wide variety of business-related litigation matters. In the Knoxville office, Eric D. Setterlund, a 2011 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Law, also handles business-related litigation matters. Prior to joining the firm, he clerked for Magistrate Judge Diane K. Vescovo in the Western District of Tennessee. In Memphis, Kristin Clay Dunavant, William O’Connor and Sarah Pazar have joined the firm. Dunavant, a 2008 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Law, focuses her practice in the areas of corporate and securities law and mergers and acquisitions. O’Connor is practicing in the firm’s Securities and Corporate Governance Group. He earned his law degree from the University of Memphis School of Law in 2012 and recently completed an externship with U.S. Bankruptcy Court Chief Judge David S. Kennedy. Pazar graduated from Vanderbilt University Law School in 2012 and previously served as a judicial extern for District Court Chief Judge Jon P. McCalla and Magistrate Judge Charmaine G. Claxton in the Western District of Tennessee. She will handle a variety of business-related litigation matters.

The law firm of Gearhiser, Peters, Elliott & Cannon recently added four attorneys to its Chattanooga office. They are: Justin B. Faith, Stacy H. Farmer, Corrin P. Fulton and David W. Hunter. Faith graduated from the University of Tennessee College of Law in 2011. Prior to joining the firm, he served as judicial law clerk for Hamilton County Chancellors W. Frank Brown III and Jeffrey M. Atherton. He will handle civil litigation at the firm. Farmer, a 2011 graduate of the Cumberland School of Law, will handle business, corporate and estate planning matters. Prior to law school, she received a master’s degree in education from Auburn University. Fulton graduated from the Appalachian School of Law. She will focus her practice on civil litigation. Finally, Hunter will handle business, corporate and estate planning for the firm. He earned his law degree from the University of Memphis and a master of laws in taxation from New York University. Prior to law school, Hunter worked for Ernst & Young.

Sandy Garrett, a 20-year veteran of the Tennessee Supreme Court Board of Professional Responsibility, has been named chief disciplinary counsel of the organization. Garrett has served in various roles with the board since 1992. She earned her law degree from Vanderbilt University Law School. Garrett, who was selected from a field of 21 applicants, replaces Nancy Jones, who is now general counsel at the Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance.

Luke D. Durham has joined the Knoxville law firm of Hagood, Tarpy & Cox as a new attorney in the Litigation Department. He will assist clients with business litigation, criminal defense, personal injury and domestic relations matters. He is a 2012 graduate of the Charleston School of Law. Prior to joining the firm, Durham clerked for Judge Irving G. Condon of Charleston, S.C.

Margaret L. Behm, partner and founder of Dodson Parker Behm & Capparella in Nashville, recently was named recipient of the David C. Rutherford Award — one of the highest honors bestowed by the Nashville Bar Association. The award is given to an attorney who exemplifies the highest standards of professionalism, collegiality and charitable contributions. Behm’s accomplishments include co-founding Nashville’s first women-owned law firm and serving as the first chair of the Tennessee Supreme Court Access to Justice Commission. She began her career at the Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands.

Doug Blaze, dean of the University of Tennessee College of Law, has been named the 2012 recipient of the Deborah Rhode Award, which is given each year by the Association of American Law Schools. The award honors a law school dean or faculty member who has made an outstanding contribution to increasing pro bono and public service opportunities for students through scholarship, leadership and service.

Nashville attorney Robert Goodrich has been elected chair of the board of directors for Tennesseans for Alternatives to the Death Penalty — a nonprofit organization that seeks repeal of the state’s death penalty. Goodrich earned his law degree in 1983 from Vanderbilt University Law School. He practices law at Stites & Harbison where he handles financial services, banking, bankruptcy, business litigation, contracts and torts.

Clarksville attorney Joel Wallace was reelected to a second term on the Clarksville City Council. Wallace was first elected in 2008 and represents the city’s Ward 9. He is employed at the law firm of Cunningham, Mitchell & Rocconi.


Compiled by Linda Murphy and Stacey Shrader Joslin. Tennessee Bar Association members may submit information about job changes, awards or work-related news. Send it to PEOPLE, c/o The Tennessee Bar Journal, 221 Fourth Ave. N., Suite 400, Nashville, TN 37219-2198, or email to Linda Murphy at lmurphy@tnbar.org. Submissions are subject to editing. Pictures are used on a space-available basis. Hard copies of photographs submitted will not be returned. Electronic photos must be saved as a tiff or jpeg file with no compression, and should be a minimum resolution of 200 dpi and at least 1” x 1.5” in size or they will not be used.