Seersucker Success

I have to thank my good friend Bill Haltom for his very kind comments in the “But Seriously, Folks” column for October 2011, commemorating the Knoxville Bar Association’s recent Seersucker Flashmob (“A Summer Celebration of Seersucker Sartorial Splendor”). Bill’s kindness to my sartorial sense was most greatly appreciated, but in all fairness, full credit needs to be shared with several other persons.

Two of my colleagues, David Ayliffe and Chris Chandler, joined me this past summer in declaring Thursdays in our office to be “seersucker Thursdays.” While each of us did not always wear our seersucker suits on Thursdays, we did for the better part of the summer. I mentioned this to the KBA’s Executive Director, Marsha Wilson, and I joked that maybe she could declare one day to be something along the lines of an Atticus Finch appreciation day” and get a photographer to record the event.  To her credit, Marsha took that idea and ran with it. So, while I am so grateful to Bill for his description of my idea as “genius”: as Thomas A. Edison allegedly quipped, genius is 10 percent inspiration and 90 percent perspiration. By that measure, the true genius was Marsha, who is the person most responsible for making this unique event happen. (I have also been informed recently by Bill that, while what I own may look to the average person like a seersucker suit, it is, in fact, not a true seersucker suit, as the term is defined by a prominent Charleston haberdasher, inasmuch as my suit has a lining. True seersucker suits are unlined — to use the proper terminology of men’s apparel, “unstructured” — because lining only adds weight and therefore provides less relief from summertime heat and humidity. Well, lined or not, I like my suit just fine, although it will be relegated to the back of my closet for the next six months.)

A final note to Bill Haltom: Something tells me that I will be seeing you clad in seersucker in the lobby of the Peabody Hotel next June (at the Tennessee Bar Association convention). I will join you in similar apparel, and we will see what may develop.

— Jack H. (Nick) McCall, Knoxville