Car Death Charges Often Different Based on Income, Gender

The Tennessean looks at two recent cases of where children died after their mothers left them in hot cars. Beneath the obvious common elements, the unrelated cases showed signs of heading down divergent paths. A law professor at Wake Forest University who analyzes deaths of children in hot cars and the resulting prosecutions found that mothers face charges more often than fathers, nonfamily caregivers more often than parents, and low-income parents more often than high-income ones. And when charges are brought, more than 80 percent of those cases end in conviction.