GPS Tracking is Battle of Public Safety and Privacy Rights

Ever since the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in August that police didn’t need a warrant to track a Knoxville suspect’s movement through his cell phone in a drug investigation, the battle has been on between public safety and privacy rights as challenges wend their way through the U.S. court system. “It’s accurate to say there are millions of requests (by police) to phone companies for tracking vehicles and people. Most of them, if not all of them, involve locating people through triangulation of signals through cellphones,” said Christopher Slobogin, a professor at Vanderbilt Law School. Nashville Public Defender Dawn Deaner said the tracking raises important questions about how far police can go without violating someone’s right to privacy. The Tennessean looks into it

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