Summers to Take Oath as Senior Judge Monday

The Tennessee Supreme Court has announced that incoming Senior Judge Paul Summers will be sworn in on Monday in Nashville. Supreme Court Justice Cornelia A. Clark will administer the oath at 9:30 a.m. at the Supreme Court Building, 401 7th Ave North. His appointment was announced earlier this month.

Today's Opinions

Click on the category of your choice to view summaries of today’s opinions from that court, or other body. A link at the end of each case summary will let you download the full opinion in PDF format.

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00 - TN Workers Comp Appeals
00 - TN Supreme Court - Rules
08 - TN Court of Appeals
12 - TN Court of Criminal Appeals
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00 - TN Supreme Court - Disciplinary Orders









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TN Court of Appeals

CHARLES BLALOCK & SONS, INC. v. FAIRTENN, LLC ET AL.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Robert R. Carl, Knoxville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Cay Partners, LLC.

Robert P. Noell, Knoxville, Tennessee, for the appellee, Charles Blalock & Sons, Inc.

Judge: SUSANO

Branch Banking and Trust Company (“BB&T”) provided financing for a construction project and recorded a deed of trust. The excavation contractor, Charles Blalock & Sons, Inc., started work on the project and had done substantial work when Marshall & Ilsley Bank (“M&I Bank”) made a loan and recorded its trust deed. BB&T was paid off out of the proceeds of the loan from M&I Bank. Blalock was also paid current with the proceeds from the M&I Bank loan. BB&T released its trust deed. The developer later defaulted, and Blalock filed this action to enforce its statutory lien. M&I Bank’s assignee, Cay Partners, LLC, filed a counterclaim asserting that it should be entitled to the priority position of BB&T. Blalock and Cay filed competing motions for summary judgment. The trial court granted Blalock’s motion. Cay appeals. We affirm.


CARRIE ALISANN HARDIN v. BRADLEY RAY HARDIN

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

James T. Powell, Union City, Tennessee, for the appellant, Carrie Alisann Hardin.

Kent T. Gearin, Martin, Tennessee, for the appellee, Bradley Ray Hardin.

Judge: STAFFORD

In this modification of custody case, Mother appeals only the trial court’s failure to make a specific finding that modification is in the child’s best interest. Concluding that the trial court failed to make the necessary findings of fact and conclusions of law, we vacate the order of the trial court naming Father primary residential parent and remand to the trial court for the entry of an order with appropriate findings of fact and conclusions of law.


IN RE HOLLY B.C. ET AL.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Arthur Bass, Cleveland, Tennessee, for the appellants, Angela C. and Chad C.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter, and Aaron E. Winter, Assistant Attorney General, Office of the Attorney General, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellee, Tennessee Department of Children’s Services.

Judge: SUSANO

This is a termination of parental rights case focusing on two minor children, Holly B.C. (DOB: December 22, 2005) and Kylie M.C. (DOB: December 6, 2006) (collectively “the Children”). Defendants, Angela C. (“Mother”) and Chad C. (“Father”), are the biological parents of the Children. The Children were taken into custody in September 2007, after the defendants left them with a church nursery worker for two weeks and did not return during that period. The Department of Children’s Services (“DCS”) filed a petition to terminate parental rights on September 25, 2008, and a hearing was held on the petition in September 2009. At the conclusion of the hearing, the trial court took the matter under advisement. The court later decided to hold the petition in abeyance to give the defendants an opportunity to make more progress with respect to their permanency plans. In July 1 2010, the defendants’ visitation with the Children was suspended due to alleged danger to the Children. A final hearing was held in September 2011. At that time, the Children had been in state custody for approximately four years. The trial court terminated the defendants’ parental rights. The court found, by clear and convincing evidence, that both parents had failed to substantially comply with the permanency plan, that the conditions leading to removal still persisted, and that termination was in the Children’s best interest. Defendants appeal. We affirm.


CLEMENTINE NEWMAN v. ALLSTATE INSURANCE COMPANY

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Clementine Newman, Pro Se.

Michael Mansfield and John O. Alexander, Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellee, Allstate Insurance Company.

Judge: FARMER

Plaintiff appeals a jury verdict awarding her damages in the amount of approximately $5,000 in her action for damages against her uninsured motorist insurance carrier. We affirm.


CLAUDE T. PHILLIPS v. NORTHWEST CORRECTIONAL COMPLEX, WARDEN HENRY STEWARD, SGT. JETTIE BALDRIDGE, AND JEFFERY MILLS

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Petitioner/Appellant, Claude T. Phillips, Henning, Tennessee, self-represented.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter, Bill Young, Solicitor General, and Shauna Jennings, Assistant Attorney General, Nashville Tennessee, for the Respondent/Appellees Northwest Correctional Complex, Warden Henry Steward, Sgt. Jettie Baldridge and Jeffery Mills.

Judge: KIRBY

This appeal concerns an inmate’s petition for a writ of certiorari. The petitioner inmate was convicted of disciplinary offenses, which were affirmed by the Tennessee Department of Corrections. The inmate filed a petition for a writ of certiorari, seeking judicial review of the convictions. The trial court found that it did not have subject matter jurisdiction to hear the inmate’s petition because it did not include a recitation that it was his first application for the writ. We reverse and remand the cause for further consideration in light of Talley v. Bd. of Prof’l Responsibility, 358 S.W.3d 185 (Tenn. 2011).


IN RE ESTATE OF JAMES SHEPERD SMITH, DECEASED

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Whitney Durand, Chattanooga, Tennessee, for the appellant, Sonya Wyche.

Jennifer Kent Exum and G. Michael Luhowiak, Chattanooga, Tennessee, for the appellee, the Estate of James Sheperd Smith.

Judge: SUSANO

Sonya Wyche (“the Putative Daughter”) was named as one of the heirs of James Sheperd Smith, deceased (“the Deceased”), in the petition for letters of administration filed by James B. Smith and Jacqueline Smith Gunn (collectively “the Adminstrators”). The Administrators filed a “Motion to Determine Identity of Heirs” approximately 13 months after the Deceased died. The court held that the Putative Daughter’s claim as a child born out of wedlock was not perfected in a timely fashion. The court also held that the Putative Daughter did not carry her burden of proving that the Administrators, by naming her as an heir in the petition, acted with intent to trick her into not filing a timely claim. The Putative Daughter appeals. We affirm.


JOHN TODD and CYNTHIA BANK-HARRIS v. SHELBY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Bradley W. Eskins and James E. King, Jr., Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellants, John Todd and Cynthia Banks-Harris.

Kim Koratsky, Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellee, Shelby County, Tennessee.

Judge: STAFFORD

This is an appeal from the grant of summary judgment in favor of Appellee Shelby County. Appellants, former employees of the Shelby County Department of Homeland Security, filed suit against Appellee for retaliatory discharge under both the Tennessee Public Protection Act, Tennessee Code Annotated Section 50-1-304, and the Tennessee Public Employee Political Freedom Act, Tennessee Code Annotated Section 8-50-603. The trial court determined that Appellants had failed to meet their burden to show that the termination of their employment was causally connected to any whistleblowing activity and granted judgment in favor of Appellee. Discerning no error, we affirm.


JAMES ROBERT WILKEN v. MARY CHARLOTTE WILKEN

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

James B. Webb and Brandon L. Newman, Trenton, Tennessee, for the Plaintiff/Appellant James Robert Wilken.

Barbara Hobock, Humboldt, Tennessee, for the Defendant/Appellee Mary Charlotte Wilken (no appellate brief filed).

Judge: KIRBY

This appeal involves jurisdiction over a divorce case. The parties lived in Maryland throughout their 19-year marriage. In 2007 or 2008, the husband left the marital home in Maryland. Several months later, he moved to Tennessee. About one year after he moved to Tennessee, the husband filed this complaint for divorce in the trial court below. The wife filed an answer and a counterclaim for divorce. The trial court conducted the first day of trial in the matter, and the case was continued. Before the trial resumed, the trial court sua sponte entered an order dismissing the case for lack of jurisdiction, in personam jurisdiction over the wife and apparently also lack of subject-matter jurisdiction over the case. The husband now appeals. We reverse the trial court’s decision and remand for further proceedings.


TN Court of Criminal Appeals

KENNETH GREGORY ALLEN v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Kenneth Gregory Allen, Only, Tennessee, Pro Se.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Lacy Wilber, Assistant Attorney General; Charles F. Crawford, Jr., District Attorney General; and Weakley E. Barnard, Assistant District Attorney General, for the Appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: MCMULLEN

The Petitioner, Kenneth Gregory Allen, appeals from the Marshall County Circuit Court’s summary dismissal of his pro se petition for post-conviction relief. On appeal, the Petitioner asserts that the post-conviction court erred in failing to acknowledge his claim of ineffective assistance of counsel and dismissing his petition based solely on finding that the issues raised therein were previously determined. Upon review, we reverse the judgment of the post-conviction court and remand for appointment of counsel and an evidentiary hearing with regard to the Petitioner’s ineffective assistance of counsel claim.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. DAVID EUGENE BREEZEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Guy T. Wilkinson and Gary J. Swayne, Camden, Tennessee, for the appellant, David Eugene Breezee.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Jeffrey D. Zentner, Assistant Attorney General; Hansel Jay McCadams, District Attorney General; and James E. Williams, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: OGLE

A Benton County Circuit Court Jury convicted the appellant, David Eugene Breezee, of rape of a child, a Class A felony, and incest, a Class C felony. After a sentencing hearing, the trial court merged the incest conviction into the rape of a child conviction and sentenced the appellant to twenty-five years in confinement. The sentence was to be served consecutively to a prior sentence. On appeal, the appellant contends that (1) the evidence is insufficient to support the convictions, (2) the trial court erred by refusing to allow him to question the victim about nude photographs taken of her by a registered sex offender, and (3) the trial court improperly ordered consecutive sentencing. The State argues that the trial court erred by merging the appellant’s convictions. Based upon the record and the parties’ briefs, we conclude that the evidence is sufficient to support the appellant’s convictions, that the trial court did not err by refusing to allow the appellant to question the victim about nude photographs, and that the trial court did not err by ordering consecutive sentencing. However, the trial court erred by merging the appellant’s convictions. Therefore, the appellant’s incest conviction is reinstated, and the case is remanded to the trial court in order for the court to resentence the appellant for both offenses.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. JERMAINE BURDETTE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Lauren M. Fuchs and Patrick E. Swanson, Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellant, Jermaine Burdette.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Rachel E. Willis, Senior Counsel; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Byron Winsett and Stacy McEndree, Assistant District Attorneys General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: PAGE

Appellant, Jermaine Burdette, pleaded guilty to three counts of especially aggravated kidnapping and three counts of aggravated robbery. The trial court sentenced him to a total effective sentence of 111 years in the Tennessee Department of Correction. Appellant argues that the trial court erred in sentencing him and by failing to merge the counts of especially aggravated kidnapping with aggravated robbery as to each victim. After reviewing the record, the parties’ briefs, and applicable law, we affirm the judgments of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. CARLOS BURRIS

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Joseph T. Howell (on appeal and at trial in No. 11-357) and Susan Korsnes, Assistant Public Defender (at trial in No. 11-155), Jackson, Tennessee, for the appellant, Carlos Burris.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Benjamin A. Ball, Assistant Attorney General; James G. Woodall, District Attorney General; and Jody Pickens, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: BIVINS

Carlos Burris (“the Defendant”) appeals his convictions in two separate trials for attempting to obtain a controlled substance by fraud and driving on a suspended license, fourth offense. The trial court sentenced the Defendant to six years for the attempting to obtain a controlled substance by fraud conviction and to eleven months, twenty-nine days for the driving on a suspended license conviction. The trial court also ordered that the two sentences run consecutively. On appeal, the Defendant contends that the evidence presented at both trials was insufficient to support his convictions. Additionally, the Defendant contends that his sentence for the first conviction was excessive and that the trial court erred by running the two sentences consecutively. After a thorough review of the record and the applicable law, we affirm the Defendant’s convictions and sentences.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. DEBORAH DAVIS

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

C. Parke Masterson, Jr., Chattanooga, Tennessee, for the appellant, Deborah Davis.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Renee W. Turner, Senior Counsel; William H. Cox, III, District Attorney General; and Brian Spurlock Finaly, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Following a bench trial, the Defendant, Deborah Davis, was convicted of one count of driving under the influence (DUI), first offense, a Class A misdemeanor. See Tenn. Code Ann. § 55-10-401. The Defendant was sentenced to eleven months, twenty-nine days with forty-eight hours to be served in confinement and the remainder to be served on unsupervised probation. In this appeal as of right, the Defendant contends (1) that the trial court erred by denying her motion to suppress all evidence gathered by the police pursuant to an accident investigation because such evidence was protected by the accident report privilege of Tennessee Code Annotated section 55-10-114(b); and (2) that the evidence was insufficient to sustain her conviction. Following our review, we conclude that these issues are without merit and affirm the judgment of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. TERRY GREEN

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Javier Bailey (at trial) and Paul Springer (on appeal), Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellant, Terry Green.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clarence E. Lutz, Assistant Attorney General; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Rob Ratton, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: BIVINS

Terry Green (“the Defendant”) entered a best interest plea to one count of theft of property of $10,000 or more but less than $60,000, with no agreement as to his sentence. Following a sentencing hearing, the trial court denied judicial diversion and sentenced the Defendant to a term of four years, with four months to be served in confinement. The trial court suspended the remainder of the sentence, placing the Defendant on probation for a period of five years. On appeal, the Defendant contends that the trial court erred in denying the Defendant’s application for diversion and/or his request for full probation. The Defendant also claims that the trial court, in determining whether to grant or deny judicial diversion, erred in allowing “evidence of allegations of wrongdoing that had nothing to do with the case before the [c]ourt” and erred in “giving more weight to that evidence.” After a thorough review of the record and the applicable law, we affirm the judgment of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. MEMORY GAYLE HALL

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Vanessa Pettigrew Bryan, District Public Defender; and Robert W. Jones, Assistant Public Defender, for the appellant, Memory Gayle Hall.

Robert E. Cooper Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clarence E. Lutz, Assistant Attorney General; Kim R. Helper, District Attorney General; Kelly A. Lawrence and Mary Katharine White, Assistant District Attorneys General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: THOMAS

The Defendant, Memory Gayle Hall, entered open pleas of guilty to driving under the influence of an intoxicant (DUI), speeding, and failing to provide evidence of financial responsibility. At sentencing, the trial court ordered her to serve forty days on consecutive weekends in the county jail, followed by probation for the balance of the eleven months and twenty-nine day sentence. She challenges the trial court’s denial of full probation, contending that she was a favorable candidate. After reviewing the record and applicable authorities, we affirm the judgments of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. MICHAEL R. MALONE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

B. Jeffery Harmon, District Public Defender; and Robert G. Morgan, Assistant Public Defender, for the appellant, Michael R. Malone.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Meredith Devault, Senior Counsel; J. Michael Taylor, District Attorney General; and William B. Copeland, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: GLENN

The defendant, Michael R. Malone, pled guilty to reckless endangerment, a Class E felony, and was sentenced to two years in the Department of Correction, to be served consecutively to a prior three-year sentence for which he was on community corrections at the time he committed the present offense. On appeal, he argues that the trial court erred in imposing consecutive sentencing. Following our review, we affirm the judgment of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. HAROLD MOORE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Tony N. Brayton (on appeal) and Alicia Kutch (at trial), Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellant, Harold Moore.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Sophia S. Lee, Assistant Attorney General; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Doug Carriker, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: OGLE

A Shelby County Criminal Court Jury convicted the appellant, Harold Moore, of selling less than .5 grams of cocaine, possessing less than .5 grams of cocaine with intent to sell, and possessing less than .5 grams of cocaine with intent to deliver. After a sentencing hearing, the trial court merged the convictions and sentenced him to five years in confinement. On appeal, the appellant contends that the evidence is insufficient to support the convictions. Based upon the record and the parties’ briefs, we affirm the judgment of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. CARRIE LYNN RONEWICZ

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Gary Antrican, District Public Defender; and Parker O. Dixon, Assistant Public Defender, for the appellant, Carrie Lynn Ronewicz.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; David H. Findley, Assistant Attorney General; Mike Dunavant, District Attorney General; and James Walter Freeland, Jr., Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WILLIAMS

After a trial by jury, the defendant was convicted of one count of theft of property valued at more than $1,000 but less than $10,000, a Class D felony. She was sentenced as a Range I, standard offender to two years, with credit for time served and the balance to be served on probation as an alternative sentence. The defendant now appeals, claiming that the evidence is insufficient to support her conviction and that the trial court erred by denying her motion to suppress evidence seized by police during a search of her property, both before and after the issuance of a search warrant. For the reasons that follow, we affirm the judgment of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. NATHANIEL SHELBOURNE
With Concurring Opinion

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Tracey A. Brewer-Walker, Ripley, Tennessee, for the appellant, Nathaniel Shelbourne.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clarence E. Lutz, Assistant Attorney General; Philip Bivens, District Attorney General; and Lance Webb, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: BIVINS

Nathaniel Shelbourne (“the Defendant”) was convicted by a jury of intentional or knowing aggravated assault causing serious bodily injury. After a sentencing hearing, the trial court sentenced the Defendant to a term of eight years in the Tennessee Department of Correction, to be served consecutively to his prior sentence. In this appeal as of right, the Defendant claims that (1) the trial court erred in admitting photographs of the victim’s injuries; (2) the trial court erred in refusing to charge the jury on the lesser-included offense of misdemeanor reckless endangerment; (3) the evidence is not sufficient to support his conviction; and (4) his sentence is excessive. After a thorough review of the record and relevant authorities, we have determined that the Defendant is not entitled to relief on any of these issues. Accordingly, we affirm the trial court’s judgment.


JARVIS Q. WILLIAMS v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Joseph S. Ozment (on appeal), Memphis, Tennessee; Ryan Feeney (at hearing), Selmer, Tennessee, and Larry Copeland (at hearing), Memphis, Tennessee, for appellant, Jarvis Q. Williams.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Sophia S. Lee, Senior Counsel; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Chris West, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: BIVINS

Jarvis Q. Williams (“the Petitioner”) filed for post-conviction relief from his convictions of seven counts of especially aggravated kidnapping and four counts of aggravated robbery, alleging ineffective assistance of trial and appellate counsel and denial of a public trial. After a hearing, the post-conviction court granted relief in the form of a reduced sentence but otherwise denied relief. This appeal followed. Upon our thorough review of the record, we affirm the judgment of the post-conviction court.


CLE Blast Continues with Live Speaker Friday

On Friday, the TBA’s Year End CLE Blast will feature Perry A. Craft giving a live presentation of the TBA’s Annual U.S. Supreme Court Review. The program will run from 9 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. In other rooms, video programs will offer sessions on ethics, malpractice, torts, bankruptcy, technology, government contracts and divorce alimony. See the full schedule for the day


Court Closed After Threat to Judge

Dickson County General Sessions court closed Friday after Sheriff Jeff Bledsoe said his department received word of a potential threat to Judge Durwood Moore. Although court personnel secured the judge, courtroom and offices appropriately, Judge Moore chose to close the court. Deputies talked to the suspect accused of making the threatening statements and determined he likely posed no threat, according to the Tennessean.


Shuttleworth Williams Moves to New Knoxville Office

Shuttleworth William PLLC recently announced it has moved to a new office in Knoxville. The firm is now located in the First Tennessee Plaza at 800 South Gay St., Suite 2031. The new space puts it closer to the Knox County Courthouse, state Supreme Court Building and U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Tennessee. Read more from the firm


Anderson Clerk Proposes New Court Fee

Anderson County Circuit Clerk Tyler Mayes has proposed a new fee to be tacked onto court costs in criminal cases as a way to supplement funding for school security measures. As a former teacher, Mayes says the idea was always on his mind, but the recent massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary pushed him to pursue the concept. In a news release this week Mayes said, “This is a fee that I will passionately fight for.” Knox News has more.


Editorial: Juvenile Court Deal Comes with Price Tag

Compliance with an agreement reached between the U.S Department of Justice (DOJ) and Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court last week is "well worth" the estimated cost the county government, the Memphis Flyer argues in an editorial today. However, the paper warns that the price tag of $4.5 to $6.5 million will strain the already financially strapped county government, and that Shelby County Mayor Mark Lutrell's bid for emergency funding from the state will exacerbate the existing shaky relationship he has with the county commission.


Judge Dismisses Suit Against NFS

A federal judge dismissed an 18-month old class action lawsuit against Erwin-based Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) and other defendants, the Johnson City Press reports. Filed in June 2011, the suit alleged injuries, property damage and emotional distress suffered by 19 plaintiffs caused by “repeated releases of hazardous and radioactive substances” by NFS.


Bass Berry Honored for Recent Deals

Bass Berry & Sims PLC has won the mergers and acquisitions “deal of the year” award in the $50 million to $100 million category from M&A Advisors for the deal in which Luminex Corp, a health care and life sciences research company, acquired privately held GenturaDX, a molecular diagnostics company focused on making nucleic acid testing affordable and practical. Bass Berry served as outside counsel to Luminex. The deal also was a finalist for the distinction of “sector deal of the year” in the category of health care/life sciences between $10 million and $100 million. The firm also was recognized for a deal it handled for Fidelity National Financial Inc., which purchased the Nashville-based restaurant chain O’Charley’s Inc. The Memphis Daily News has the story. Other businesses with Tennessee connections that were honored include Miller & Martin PLLC and International Paper Corporation. See the full list of companies recognized.


Jury Rules Against Franklin-Based Acadia Healthcare

Universal Health Services of Pennsylvania won a $6.89 million jury verdict against Franklin-based Acadia Healthcare Co. and five former Universal employees for violating non-compete clauses and misappropriating confidential information, according to the Nashville Business Journal. Universal Health Services purchased Psychiatric Solutions Inc., also based in Franklin, in November 2010. Many of Pyschiatric Solutions' management team then went to work at Acadia.


Chattanooga Attorney Honored for Conservation Efforts

The Trust for Public Land, the nation’s second-largest land conservation organization, is awarding Chattanooga attorney Allen McCallie with its highest honor, the Douglas P. Ferguson Award. McCallie has helped create public parks and open spaces around Chattanooga for 15 years. Additionally, he supported the development of the Aetna Mountain Wildlife Management Area, the Tennessee River Gorge and the Lula Lake trail system. WATE Knoxville has the story.


Toyota Proposes $1.1 Billion Settlement

Toyota Motor Corp. has agreed to pay $1.1 billon to settle a class-action lawsuit over claims that millions of its vehicles from 1998 to 2010 accelerate unintentionally. The settlement will compensate Toyota customers for any financial losses related to possible safety defects in their vehicles. Toyota admitted no fault in the proposed settlement. The Nashville Business Journal has more.


Chancellor Applicant Resides in Scott County

In a story reported in the Dec. 21 TBA Today, one of the applicants for the 8th Judicial District chancellor, Andrew R. Tillman, was identified with his work address, which is in Knoxville. His residence is in Huntsville in Scott County. The position is for residents of Campbell, Claiborne, Fentress, Scott and Union counties.


15 Lawyers Reinstated After Administrative Suspension

Fifteen Tennessee-licensed lawyers have been reinstated to the practice of law after being administratively suspended for failure to file the last two years of the state professional tax, or the 2011 and 2012 annual fee and IOLTA report. See the updated lists at the links above.


 
 

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About this publication: Today's News is a compilation of digests of news reports of interest to Tennessee lawyers compiled by TBA staff, links to digested press releases, and occasional stories about the TBA and other activities written by the TBA staff or members. Statements or opinions herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Tennessee Bar Association, its officers, board or staff.


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