Lt. Gov. Releases Judicial Redistricting Proposals

Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey has released 14 different judicial redistricting plans put forward for consideration. “The response we have gotten to our public call for judicial district maps is extremely encouraging,” Ramsey earlier said in a statement to TNReport. “I would especially like to commend the Public Defenders Association as well as the Tennessee Bar Association for coming to the table and sharing their ideas.” A bill (SB 780/HB 636), which is expected serve as the vehicle for redistricting, is set for a hearing in the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday afternoon.

Today's Opinions

Click on the category of your choice to view summaries of today’s opinions from that court, or other body. A link at the end of each case summary will let you download the full opinion in PDF format.

00 - TN Supreme Court
01 - TN Workers Comp Appeals
00 - TN Supreme Court - Rules
05 - TN Court of Appeals
09 - TN Court of Criminal Appeals
00 - TN Attorney General Opinions
00 - Judicial Ethics Opinions
00 - Formal Ethics Opinions - BPR
00 - TN Supreme Court - Disciplinary Orders









You can obtain full-text versions of the opinions two ways. We recommend that you download the Opinions to your computer and then open them from there. 1) Click the URL at end of each Opinion paragraph below. This should give you the option to download the original document. If not, you may need to right-click on the URL to get the option to save the file to your computer.


TN Workers Comp Appeals

BILLY WARD v. DELL PRODUCTS, L.P. ET AL.

Court: TN Workers Comp Appeals

Attorneys:

Billy Ward, Lebanon, Tennessee, pro se.

John W. Barringer, Jr., and Neesha S. Hatcher, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellees, Dell Products, L.P. and Insurance Company of the State of Pennsylvania.

Judge: MCGINLEY

In this worker’s compensation case, the employee alleged that his job caused a compensable aggravation of arthritis in his knees. The trial court found that his employment had caused only an increase of symptoms, and, therefore, he did not sustain a compensable injury. The employee has appealed. Pursuant to Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 51, this appeal has been referred to the Special Workers’ Compensation Appeals Panel for a hearing and a report of findings of fact and conclusions of law. We affirm the judgment of the trial court.


TN Court of Appeals

A. JULIAN AHLER v. WALTER STEPHEN STEWART, ET AL.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Mark N. Foster, Rockwood, Tennessee, for the appellants.

Richard L. Hollow, Knoxville, Tennessee, for the appellees, Rebecca K. McClurkan and Ahler Trust.

Jack H. McPherson, Jr., Kingston, Tennessee, for the appellee, A. Julian Ahler.

Judge: PER CURIAM

This is an appeal from an order transferring the action below from the Circuit Court for Roane County to the Chancery Court for Roane County. Because the order appealed from does not resolve any issues raised in the proceedings but merely transfers those claims to another court, we dismiss this appeal for lack of a final judgment.


IN THE MATTER OF CHEYENNE E. H. AND ROBERT L. H.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Stacie Odeneal, Lawrenceburg, Tennessee, for the appellant, Doloria H.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; and Marcie E. Greene, Assistant Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee, Department of Children’s Services.

Judge: DINKINS

Mother’s parental rights to two children were terminated on the grounds of abandonment by failure to support, substantial non-compliance with permanency plans, and persistence of conditions. The court also concluded that termination of Mother’s rights was in the best interests of the children. Mother appeals, contending that the evidence does not support the statutory grounds or that termination is in the children’s best interest and asserting that the Department of Children’s Services did not make reasonable efforts to reunify the family. We affirm the judgment terminating her rights.


IN RE: ESTEFANI Y. M., ET AL.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Aaron Chapman, Morristown, Tennessee, for the appellant.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter, and Paul Jordan Scott, Assistant Attorney General, General Civil Division, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellee, Tennessee Department of Children’s Services.

Lauren Marie Armstrong, Morristown, Tennessee, Guardian Ad Litem.

Judge: PER CURIAM

This is an appeal by Elvira N. M. from an order terminating her parental rights to her two minor children, Estefani Y. M. and Vanessa N. M. The order terminating the appellant’s parental rights was entered on October 15, 2012. The Notice of Appeal was not filed until November 15, 2012, more than (30) days from the date of entry of the October 15, 2012 order. Because the Notice of Appeal was not timely filed, we have no jurisdiction to consider this appeal.


METROPOLITAN NASHVILLE EDUCATION ASSOCIATION AND JAMES FULLER v. THE METROPOLITAN BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Richard Lee Colbert, Courtney Lynch Wilbert, Franklin, Tennessee, for the appellant, James Fuller.

Lora Barkenbus Fox, Emily Herring Lamb, Paul Jefferson Campbell, II, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellee, The Metropolitan Board of Public Education.

Judge: COTTRELL

A teacher at Overton High School, who was also a sports coach, challenged the nonrenewal of his coaching contract, claiming the nonrenewal was not in accordance with Tenn. Code Ann. § 49-5-510. The trial court found the contract was not renewed because the teacher refused to follow the guidelines for handling money collected at the sporting events and that the former coach had not met his burden of proof under the statute. We conclude the evidence supports the trial court’s ruling and affirm the judgment.


IN RE: THE ADOPTION OF A MALE CHILD Z. J. D.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Lynn Newcomb, Ashland City, for the appellants, B.B. and E.B.

John Benneth Iwu, Antioch, Tennessee, for the appellee, G.D.

Judge: COTTRELL

Mother and Stepfather filed a petition to terminate Father’s rights to his fourteen year old son to allow Stepfather to adopt the child. Mother and Stepfather asserted Father abandoned the child because his visits constitute nothing more than “token visitation.” Father lives in Massachusetts and usually visits the child once a year. Father’s most recent visit was one month before Mother and Stepfather filed their petition. The trial court denied the petition and we affirm the trial court’s judgment. Father presented evidence that he has tried to communicate and visit more with the child but that Mother has thwarted his efforts. Based on the particular facts of this case we conclude Father has not abandoned the child by failing to visit, or engaging in “token visitation” as set forth in Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-1-102, in the four months preceding the filing of the petition for termination.


TN Court of Criminal Appeals

CRAIG L. BEENE V. STATE OF TENNESSEE and JOE EASTERLING, WARDEN

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Craig L. Beene, Pro Se, Mountain City, Tennessee.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Mark A. Fulks, Assistant Attorney General; and Dan M. Alsobrooks, District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: SMITH

Petitioner, Craig L. Beene, appeals Dickson County Circuit Court’s denial of his petition for writ of habeas corpus. After a review of the record and applicable authorities, we conclude that the failure of Petitioner to file a complete copy of the petition for habeas corpus relief or the judgments from which he is appealing violate the requirements for seeking habeas corpus relief. Therefore, we affirm the judgment of the habeas corpus court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. FRANCES KAYLANICOLE GRECH

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

David A. Doyle, District Public Defender, Gallatin, Tennessee, for the appellant, Frances Kaylanicole Grech.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clark B. Thornton, Assistant Attorney General; Lawrence T. Whitley, District Attorney General; and Tara Wyllie, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: SMITH

Appellant, Frances Kaylanicole Grech, pled guilty to one count of facilitation of aggravated robbery and one count of robbery. As a result of these convictions she was sentenced to ten years and ordered to serve 180 days with the remainder to be served on probation. Appellant was charged with assault while in jail and felony escape shortly after her release. A probation violation warrant was filed based on the two charges. She subsequently pled guilty to assault and an amended charge of resisting arrest. The trial court held a probation revocation hearing and at the conclusion determined that she had violated the rules of her probation and imposed her original sentence. On appeal, she argues that the trial court did not use conscientious judgment. We conclude that Appellant clearly violated the rules of her probation and we find no abuse of discretion. Therefore, we affirm the decision of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. ZACHERIAH HOLDEN

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

C. Brent Keeton, Manchester, Tennessee, for the appellant, Zacheriah Holden.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Lindsy Paduch Stempel, Assistant Attorney General; and Lisa Zavogiannis, District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: SMITH

Appellant, Zacheriah Holden, was indicted by the Warren County Grand Jury for over thirty offenses as a result of a drunk driving accident in which two people were killed. He pled guilty to several offenses before trial and was found guilty of the remaining charges. After the proper merger of offenses, Appellant’s convictions were two counts of aggravated vehicular homicide, one count of reckless endangerment, driving on a revoked license, evading arrest, resisting arrest, leaving the scene of the accident, five counts of failure to render aid, failure to obey a traffic device and violation of the financial responsibility law. The trial court sentenced Appellant to an effective sentence of thirty years and eight months. Appellant appeals his convictions and his sentences. Appellant raises several issues on appeal. He argues that: (1) the trial court erred in denying his request for change of venue; (2) the trial court erred in denying his request for sequestration of the jury; (3) the trial court erred in denying Appellant’s various motions to suppress his statements to law enforcement and his seizure in a car; (4)the trial court erred in denying his motion to exclude the testimony of the State’s accident reconstructionist as an expert witness; (5) the trial court erred in allowing the State to present a photograph of the victims’ car; (6) the trial court erred in failing to sever DUI, fourth offense from aggravated vehicular homicide; (7) the trial court erred in excluding the testimony of Travis Battles who was going to testify to updates to the traffic light since the accident; (8) the State did not sufficiently prove the chain of custody of Appellant’s blood sample submitted for blood alcohol testing; (9) the evidence was not sufficient to support his convictions; (10) the sentencing scheme for aggravated vehicular homicide is unconstitutional; (11) the trial court erred in imposing the length of his sentences, as well as imposing consecutive sentences; and (12) the trial court erred in its evidentiary rulings on various pieces of evidence. We have thoroughly reviewed the record on appeal and conclude that the issues raised to not warrant reversal of the judgments below. Therefore, we affirm the judgments of the trial court.


DORIS NELL JONES v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Shara A. Flacy, Ardmore, Tennessee, for the appellant, Doris Nell Jones.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clarence E. Lutz, Assistant Attorney General; and Mike Bottoms, District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: SMITH

Petitioner, Doris Nell Jones, was convicted of second degree murder and sentenced to eighteen years in incarceration. On direct appeal, this Court dismissed the appeal for lack of jurisdiction based on an untimely notice of appeal and the absence of a motion for new trial in the record. State v. Doris Nell Jones, No. M2007-00791-CCA-R3-CD, 2008 WL 544576, at *1 (Tenn. Crim. App., at Nashville, Feb. 27, 2008), perm. app. granted, (Tenn. June 1, 2009). The supreme court remanded the case for reconsideration in light of its opinion in State v. Byington, 284 S.W.3d 220 (Tenn. 2009). On remand, this Court affirmed the conviction and sentence. State v. Doris Nell Jones, No. M2009-01102-CCA-RM-CD, 2009 WL 2633026, at *1 (Tenn. Crim. App., at Nashville, Aug. 26, 2009) (not for citation), perm. app. denied, (Tenn. Feb. 22, 2010). Petitioner subsequently sought post-conviction relief. After a hearing, the post-conviction court denied relief. Petitioner appeals, arguing that the post-conviction court improperly denied relief. After a review of the record, we affirm the post-conviction court’s denial of post-conviction relief because Petitioner has failed to show by clear and convincing evidence that she is entitled to post-conviction relief. Accordingly, the judgment of the post-conviction court is affirmed.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. MICHAEL RAY MCKEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

George Morton Googe, District Public Defender; Paul Meyers and Kandi K. Collins, Assistant Public Defenders, for the appellant, Michael Ray McKee.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Leslie E. Price, Assistant Attorney General; Jerry Woodall, District Attorney General; and James W. Thompson, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: THOMAS

The Defendant, Michael Ray McKee, contends that his right to a speedy trial regarding his probation revocation hearing was violated and, as a result, the trial court erred in revoking his probation. After reviewing the record and the applicable authorities, we conclude that the Defendant’s constitutional right to a speedy trial was not violated and that there was sufficient evidence presented to support the trial court’s revocation; we affirm the judgment of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. TELLY ROMERAS ROBERTSON

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Peter J. Strainse, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Telly Romeras Robertson.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clark B. Thornton, Assistant Attorney General; Victor S. Johnson, III, District Attorney General; and Renee Erb, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: SMITH

Appellant, Telly Romeras Robertson, was indicted by the Davidson County Grand Jury in October of 2008 for one count of possession of .5 grams or more of cocaine with the intent to sell or deliver, one count of possession of more than ten pounds of marijuana with intent to sell or deliver, and one count of possession of a firearm with the intent to go armed during the commission of or attempt to commit a dangerous felony. In January of 2009, Appellant was indicted by the Davidson County Grand Jury for one count of possession of ecstacy with the intent to sell or deliver, one count of possession of drug paraphernalia with the intent to prepare a controlled substance, one count of possession of a firearm with the intent to go armed during the commission of or attempt to commit a dangerous felony, and casual exchange of marijuana. Appellant pled guilty to one count of possession with intent to sell ecstacy and possession with intent to deliver between .5 ounce and ten pounds of marijuana in exchange for sentences of ten years and two years, respectively. The sentences were to run consecutively to each other and to an eight-year sentence Appellant was already serving for conspiracy to commit money laundering, for a total effective sentence of twenty years. At a sentencing hearing, the trial court denied an alternative sentence. Appellant appeals. After a review of the record and authorities, we conclude that the trial court did not abuse its discretion in denying an alternative sentence where: (1) Appellant was sentenced to a Class B felony, rendering him ineligible for probation; (2) probation was denied in order to avoid depreciating the seriousness of the offense; and (3) Appellant was incarcerated at the time of sentencing, rendering him ineligible for a sentence of Community Corrections. The judgments of the trial court are affirmed.


OSCAR TORRES v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Ashley Morris, Maryville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Oscar Torres.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Rachel Harmon, Assistant Attorney General; Michael L. Flynn, District Attorney General; and Matthew Dunn, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WILLIAMS

The petitioner, Oscar Torres, appeals the denial of his petition for post-conviction relief. The petitioner is currently serving an effective twenty-year sentence in the Department of Correction following his conviction for two counts of rape of a child, Class A felonies. On appeal, he contends that the post-conviction court erred by denying his petition for relief because he received ineffective assistance of counsel. Specifically, he contends that trial counsel was ineffective for: (1) failing to object during jury-out hearings to recalling the victim as a rebuttal witness; and (2) failing to call an expert witness pertaining to the faultiness of the memory of a child witness. Following review of the record, we find no error and affirm the denial of the petition.


CHARLES EDWARD WILBOURN v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Everett E. Parrish, Brentwood, Tennessee, for the appellant, Charles Edward Wilbourn.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Rachel Harmon, Assistant Attorney General; Victor S. Johnson, District Attorney General, and Bret Gunn, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: SMITH

Appellant, Charles Edward Wilbourn, was indicted by the Davidson County Grand Jury for one count of possession of more than .5 grams of cocaine for sale in a drug-free zone. On February 19, 2010, Appellant pled guilty in a negotiated plea to the charge and an eight-year sentence to be served at 100 percent. Appellant subsequently filed a timely petition for postconviction relief. After appointment of counsel, an amended petition was filed. One of the issues raised was that trial counsel afforded Petitioner ineffective assistance of counsel because she did not adequately investigate whether the incident actually occurred in a drugfree non-school zone. After an evidentiary hearing, the post-conviction court denied the petition. On appeal, Petitioner argues that the post-conviction court erred with respect to the above issue. After a thorough review of the record, we conclude that the post-conviction court did not err in denying the petition. Therefore, we affirm the denial of the petition for post-conviction relief.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. CHARLES L. WILLIAMS

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Mark C. Scruggs, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Charles L. Williams.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Brent C. Cherry, Assistant Attorney General; Victor S. Johnson, III, District Attorney General; and Brian Holmgren, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: SMITH

Appellant, Charles L. Williams, was indicted in October of 2003 for one count of rape of a child and two counts of rape. In November of 2005, the case proceeded to trial. Appellant was convicted as charged and sentenced to an effective sentence of twenty-two years in incarceration. Appellant appealed the convictions and sentence. See State v. Charles L. Williams, No. M2005-00836-CCA-R3-CD, 2006 WL 3431920 (Tenn. Crim. App., at Nashville, Nov. 29, 2006) (“Williams I”). On appeal, this Court reversed the convictions and remanded for a new trial. Id. at *1. On remand, Appellant was again found guilty of rape of a child and two counts of rape. This time, the trial court sentenced Appellant to an effective sentence of seventeen years, merging the two convictions for rape with the conviction for rape of a child. Appellant appeals his convictions after retrial, arguing: (1) that the trial court should have dismissed the indictment with prejudice because the State committed violations of Rule 16 of the Tennessee Rules of Criminal Procedure and Brady v. Maryland, 373 U.S. 83 (1963), by failing to provide audible videotapes of interviews with Appellant and the victim until three days into the second trial; (2) that the trial court failed to follow the mandate of this Court with respect to expert testimony; (3) that the trial court permitted improper testimony of experts; and (4) that the remedy for the trial court’s errors is a dismissal of the indictment. After a review of the record and applicable authorities, we conclude that the State did not commit a Brady violation where the information in the videotapes was not material; Agent Johnson’s testimony was not in contravention of this Court’s opinion on direct appeal; and the expert testimony elicited at trial was based on information actually perceived by the expert in his examination of the evidence. Accordingly, the judgments of the trial court are affirmed.


Knox County’s First Female Circuit Judge Takes Bench

New Knox County Circuit Court Judge Deborah C. Stevens received the oath of office from Knox County Juvenile Court Judge Tim Irwin at a swearing in ceremony this week. Stevens, who replaces retired Judge Wheeler Rosenbalm, most recently was president and managing shareholder at Lewis, King, Krieg & Waldrop. She is the first female circuit court judge to serve on the bench in Knox County. After taking her oath, she told the Knoxville News Sentinel that she has been on the other side of the bench for 30 years and now looks forward to being a judge.


Judge Names Special Master for Shelby Schools Merger

U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays this week named former city of Memphis chief administrative officer Rick Masson as special master to oversee the county and city schools merger. Mays also enumerated specific duties for Masson, who has worked in city government for most of his career, according to the Commercial Appeal. The appointment generally was met with positive reviews. The Memphis Daily News has more on Masson's past and the reputation he has developed, including that of "bridge builder" and "fixer," according to another source.


Chattanooga Lawyer, Law Prof Named ‘Woman of Distinction’

The American Lung Association of Tennessee has named Carol Mutter as a 2013 Woman of Distinction. The mayor of Lookout Mountain has a long and varied career as a lawyer, clerking for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, working in private practice, and teaching for 30 years at the University of Tennessee College of Law. She also authored a comprehensive work on comparative fault and lectured extensively at legal education programs. Among her volunteer work, Mutter served as chair of the TBA Health Law Section and chair of the Insurance Law Section of the Association of American Law Schools. The Hamilton County Herald has more on her career.


Justice Center Plans Stall in Maury County

Plans for building a new $41 million criminal justice center in Maury County stalled this week, when the County Commission’s Building Committee voted 5-4 on Wednesday to keep the plans from advancing on to the Budget Committee for further discussion. Building Committee Chair Andy Jackson said it is still possible that discussion of the project could be revived within the month, the Daily Herald reports.


Memphis Law Takes 1st Place in 2 Competitions

The University of Memphis School of Law’s National Trial Team has won the regional tournament of the National Trial Competition, which tests participants’ advocacy skills. A second team from the school also placed ninth. The first place team, coached by Professor Danny Schaffzin and visiting professor Michelle Slack, advances to the national finals April 3-5 in San Antonio. In addition, the law school’s Mediation Team has won its regional competition for the second year in a row, beating the University of Tennessee team in the final round. Team members, coached by attorney Steve Shields, will compete in the national competition April 3-4 in Chicago, the university reports.


Stetson Launches New Online Advocacy Program

Stetson University College in Gulfport, Fla., is launching a new master of laws in advocacy degree program in August that will be conducted primarily online. The school says the program is designed to meet the needs of busy legal practitioners who wish to learn the Stetson method of advocacy. The new degree will be offered through Stetson’s Center for Excellence in Advocacy. The deadline for applications is June 1. Application fees for the new program have been waived. Learn more on the school's website.


Workers Comp Bill Moves to Full Committee

Gov. Bill Haslam's plan to overhaul the state workers' comp system is moving forward after a House subcommittee approved the measure. With that action, the bill heads to the full House Consumer and Human Resources Committee, where it is scheduled to be considered on March 12, according to the Nashville Business Journal. The subcommittee meeting took an interesting turn when the chair of the full committee was heard on a live microphone saying he planned to ram the bill through. The Nashville Scene has those remarks.


Track Legislation of Interest to Tennessee Attorneys

The TBA has a number of tools to help you track action in the Tennessee General Assembly. Read TBA Today for regular news updates and follow the TBA Action List to track bills in the General Assembly that the TBA has a direct interest in -- those it has initiated, taken a position on, or has a policy on. The TBA Watch List is a broader list of bills of interest to the Tennessee legal community.


Court Turns Down Appeal From Highway Commissioner

The Tennessee Supreme Court on Tuesday denied former Sullivan County Highway Commissioner Allen Pope’s felony conviction appeal, ending his three-year legal battle. In 2010, Pope was convicted of theft of services of over $10,000, official misconduct and using public equipment for private purposes, TriCities.com reports.


Former Judge, Legislator Galbreath Dies at Home

Former Nashville legislator and appeals court judge Charles Galbreath died at his home on Tuesday (Feb. 5). He was 88. A Nashville native, Galbreath was one of the most flamboyant power brokers of his generation, known for his theatrics as well as his accomplishments, the Tennessean reports. “He was a bit of a showman, but his roots were with being a public defender,” said John Seigenthaler, a former Tennessean editor and publisher. “He had a lot of street smarts, and he was a popular politician. He really knew how to massage a message.” Friend and fellow Tennessee lawyer Hal Hardin said Galbreath was “very much a fan of the First Amendment. On the court he was often the sole dissenter, and he took great satisfaction in that.” A Life Celebration and remembrances will be held Sunday, from 2-5 p.m., at West Harpeth Funeral Home, 6962 Charlotte Pike, Nashville. In lieu of flowers, the family asks donations be made to The Alzheimer's Association.


Services Pending for Longtime Tri-Cities Defense Attorney

Tri-Cities criminal defense attorney Mark Slagle, 61, died Tuesday (March 5) after an extended illness. He was in Dallas waiting on a lung transplant and had continued to work from there. Slagle handled criminal, civil and domestic litigation for 34 years and was a “formidable” opponent in the courtroom, according to the Johnson City Press. Funeral arrangements are not yet complete. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family through Morris-Baker Funeral Home in Johnson City, which is handling arrangements.


St. Patrick’s Day Event Benefits 2 Nashville Charities

Nashville law firm Hall Booth Smith is hosting its third annual St. Patrick’s Day Celebration March 14, from 5 to 8 p.m. The event -- set for Rooster’s Texas Style BBQ and Steakhouse at 123 12th Ave. N. -- will bring together members of the legal community and benefit Hands On Nashville and Hospital Hospitality House. A $10 donation at the door is requested. Download a flyer for the event.


 
 

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About this publication: Today's News is a compilation of digests of news reports of interest to Tennessee lawyers compiled by TBA staff, links to digested press releases, and occasional stories about the TBA and other activities written by the TBA staff or members. Statements or opinions herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Tennessee Bar Association, its officers, board or staff.


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