Report: 3 Judges Won't Receive Retention Endorsement

The Judicial Performance Evaluation Commission is set to recommend three appellate court judges not be retained in the 2014 elections, reports Tom Humphrey in his Humphrey on the Hill blog for Knoxnews. The three, according to Humphrey, are Court of Appeals Judge Andy Bennett and Court of Criminal Appeals Judges Camille R. McMullen and Jerry L. Smith. The commission is set to meet Dec. 6 to make its final decision. Meanwhile, Tennessee Supreme Court Chief Justice Gary Wade is challenging the commission’s position, saying all three judges deserve new terms. Charles D. Susano Jr. of Knoxville, presiding judge of the Court of Appeals, also spoke out in support of one of the three saying he has worked extensively with Judge Bennett. Others are questioning the comission's partisan leanings -- all of the rejected jurists have Democratic backgrounds while almost all the commissioners are Republicans. The one commissioner who spoke on the record to Humphrey told him that the judges slated not to receive endorsements had poor survey results and slow turnaround times in issuing rulings and came across as nonchalant about their shortcomings during interviews with the commission.

Today's Opinions

Click on the category of your choice to view summaries of today’s opinions from that court, or other body. A link at the end of each case summary will let you download the full opinion in PDF format.

01 - TN Supreme Court
00 - TN Workers Comp Appeals
00 - TN Supreme Court - Rules
03 - TN Court of Appeals
11 - TN Court of Criminal Appeals
04 - TN Attorney General Opinions
00 - Judicial Ethics Opinions
00 - Formal Ethics Opinions - BPR
00 - TN Supreme Court - Disciplinary Orders









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TN Supreme Court

SUPREME COURT OF TENNESSEE SUPREME COURT DISCRETIONARY APPEALS Grants & Denials List

Court: TN Supreme Court


TN Court of Appeals

SHARYN BOVAT V. NISSAN NORTH AMERICA

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Sharyn Bovat, Oak Brook, Illinois, Pro Se.

Joy Anne Boyd and Brigid M. Carpenter, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellee, Nissan North America, Inc.

Judge: CLEMENT

This civil action is the progeny of a criminal proceeding in which Plaintiff was indicted by the Williamson County Grand Jury for criminal trespass and stalking following an incident that occurred at the headquarters of Nissan North America. Plaintiff was convicted of criminal trespass; however, the stalking charge was dismissed because a corporation is not defined as a “person” under the stalking statute. Thereafter, Plaintiff filed this action against Nissan North America asserting claims for malicious prosecution and abuse of process pertaining to the stalking charge. Nissan filed a motion for summary judgment and a statement of undisputed facts that was supported by the affidavit of the Williamson County Deputy District Attorney General who investigated and prosecuted the criminal proceedings. Plaintiff filed a response opposing Nissan’s motion for summary judgment; however, she failed to file a statement of disputed facts or any affidavit or deposition testimony to dispute the facts relied upon by Nissan as Tennessee Rule of Civil Procedure 56.03 requires. After setting forth its findings of fact and conclusions of law as required by Rule 56.04, the trial court summarily dismissed the complaint upon the findings that Nissan presented competent evidence to negate essential elements of Plaintiff’s claims and that Plaintiff failed to create an issue of disputed material fact regarding any of the grounds relied upon by Nissan. We have determined that the record supports the trial court’s findings of fact and conclusions of law. Thus, we affirm the summary dismissal of the complaint.


DISCOVER BANK ISSUER OF DISCOVER CARD v. LAYTON HOWELL, III

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Geoffrey Coston, Franklin, Tennessee, for the appellant, Layton Howell, III.

Charlotte L. Rhodes and J. Bart Lloyd, Birmingham, Alabama, for the appellee, Discover Bank, Issuer of Discover Card.

Judge: CLEMENT

Plaintiff filed a Complaint on Sworn Account, pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated § 24- 5-107, for unpaid credit card charges against the credit card holder. Plaintiff subsequently filed a motion for summary judgment that was accompanied by a statement of the material facts as to which Plaintiff contended there was no genuine issue for trial, and each fact was set forth in a separate, numbered paragraph as the rule required, with a specific citation to the record. Defendant filed a response objecting to the motion; however, Defendant failed to demonstrate that the facts Plaintiff relied upon in making the motion for summary judgment were, in fact, disputed as required by Tennessee Rule of Civil Procedure 56.03. As a consequence, the facts relied upon by Plaintiff were undisputed and the trial court determined that Plaintiff was entitled to judgment for the amount owed. We affirm.


STATE OF TENNESSEE, EX REL, WILLIAM L. GIBBONS, ET AL v. CLAYTON R. SMART, ET AL

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; William E. Young, Solicitor General; Laura T. Kidwell, Senior Counsel, Financial Division, for appellee, State of Tennessee.

Max Shelton, Memphis, Tennessee, Receiver for Forest Hill Funeral Home and Memorial Park-East, LLC.

Gregory S. Gallagher, Memphis, Tennessee, for appellant, David Lenoir.

Judge: STAFFORD

This is an appeal from the trial court’s denial of penalties and interest on ad valorum taxes owed by a funeral home business after the business was placed in receivership. The Appellant/Shelby County Trustee filed a claim with the Appellee/Receiver to recover delinquent taxes, penalties and interest. The trial court denied the penalties and interest, but allowed the Receiver to pay the base taxes. The Trustee appeals. Discerning no abuse of discretion, we affirm and remand.


TN Court of Criminal Appeals

BRANDON COMPTON v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Robert L. Vogel, Knoxville, Tennessee, for the Appellant, Brandon Compton.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Lacy Wilber, Assistant Attorney General; Randall Nichols, District Attorney General; and Leslie Nassios, Assistant District Attorney General, for the Appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WEDEMEYER

A jury convicted the Petitioner, Brandon Compton, of two counts of first degree murder. On direct appeal, this Court vacated the judgments of conviction and entered convictions for second degree murder, remanding to the trial court for resentencing. State v. Brandon Compton, No. E2005-01419-CCA-R3-CD, 2006 WL 2924992, at *1 (Tenn. Crim. App., at Knoxville, Oct. 13, 2006) perm. to app. denied (Feb. 26, 2007). After the trial court resentenced the Petitioner to twenty-five years for each of his second degree murder convictions to be served consecutively, this Court affirmed the twenty-five year consecutive sentences. State v. Brandon Compton, No. E2007-01790-CCA-R3-CD, 2008 WL 4071825 (Tenn. Crim. App., at Knoxville, Sept. 2, 2008) perm. app. denied (Feb. 17, 2009). The Petitioner timely filed a petition seeking post-conviction relief on the basis of ineffective assistance of counsel, which the post-conviction court denied after a hearing. The Petitioner appeals the post-conviction court’s denial, claiming that his attorney failed to: (1) adequately investigate witnesses, (2) present the theory of self-defense, (3) refute the State’s characterization of the Petitioner as a drug dealer, and (4) present expert testimony on gunshot residue. After a thorough review of the record, the briefs, and relevant authorities, we affirm the post-conviction court’s judgment.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. STEPHEN WAYNE DAVIS

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Stephen C. Bush, District Public Defender; and Gregory D. Gookin, Assistant District Public Defender, for the appellant, Stephen Wayne Davis.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Sophia S. Lee, Assistant Attorney General; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Brian Gilliam, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WITT

The defendant, Stephen Wayne Davis, appeals from his 2012 Madison County Circuit Court jury convictions of guilty of one count each of aggravated kidnapping, robbery, and attempt to commit rape. On appeal, the defendant challenges the sufficiency of the convicting evidence. Because the record supports the jury verdicts and because we conclude that principles of due process do not invalidate the aggravated kidnapping conviction, we affirm the convictions.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. CURTIS KELLER

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

R. Todd Mosdley, Memphis, Tennessee (on appeal); Mark Mesler, Memphis, Tennessee (at trial), for the appellant, Curtis Keller.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Sophia S. Lee, Senior Counsel; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Paul Hagerman, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WILLIAMS

After a jury trial, the defendant was found guilty of three counts of especially aggravated kidnapping, three counts of aggravated robbery, four counts of attempted aggravated robbery, one count of aggravated burglary, and one count of evading arrest. He received an effective sentence of three hundred years. The defendant was convicted on the theory of criminal responsibility for the conduct of another as he was not physically present in the home during the violent home invasion. On appeal, the defendant claims that the evidence is insufficient to support his convictions, that his convictions should be reversed because the State failed to establish the chain of custody of a ski mask containing the defendant’s DNA that was recovered from the getaway vehicle after the crimes, and that the trial court erred by failing to declare a mistrial after a witness made a general remark to the effect that the defendant had engaged wrongful behavior in the past. After review, we find that the defendant’s claims lack merit. The judgments of the trial court are affirmed.


FREDERICK MOORE v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Joseph T. Howell, Jackson, Tennessee, for the appellant, Frederick Moore.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General & Reporter; Clarence Lutz, Assistant Attorney General; James G. Woodall, District Attorney General; and Jody S. Pickens, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WILLIAMS

The petitioner, Frederick Moore, was convicted by a jury of first degree (premeditated) murder; first degree (felony) murder, a Class A felony; aggravated kidnapping, a Class B felony; and two counts of tampering with evidence, Class C felonies. The petitioner was sentenced to life plus twenty years. The petitioner now appeals the post conviction court’s denial of his petition for post conviction relief in which he alleged he received ineffective assistance of counsel at trial. After review, we affirm the post conviction court’s denial of relief.


MICHAEL AARON POUNDS v. ROLAND COLSON, WARDEN

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Michael Aaron Pounds, Nashville, Tennessee, pro se.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Sophia S. Lee, Assistant Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WITT

The petitioner, Michael Aaron Pounds, appeals from the summary dismissal of his petition for writ of habeas corpus, which challenged his 1988 conviction of felony murder. In this appeal, the petitioner lists some 65 issues for appellate review. His chief complaint, however, appears to be that an inconsistency between the wording of the indictment and the plea agreement documents renders his conviction void. Discerning no error, we affirm the summary dismissal of the petition for writ of habeas corpus.


DEMARCUS SANDERS v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Juni S. Ganguli, Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellant, Demarcus Sanders.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; John H. Bledsoe, Assistant Attorney General; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Paul Goodman, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WOODALL

Petitioner, Demarcus Sanders, appeals from the trial court’s denial of post-conviction relief following an evidentiary hearing. Petitioner attacked his guilty plea to second degree murder and his resulting twenty-five-year sentence on the basis that his trial counsel rendered ineffective assistance of counsel as a result of which Petitioner entered a guilty plea that was not knowingly and voluntarily entered. After a thorough review of the record and the parties’ briefs, we affirm the judgment of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. KYTO SIHAPANYA
With Dissenting Opinion

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

James W. Curry, Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellant, Kyto Sihapanya.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clarence E. Lutz, Assistant Attorney General; D. Michael Dunavant, District Attorney General; and Matthew B. Hooper, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: TIPTON

The Defendant, Kyto Sihapanya, pleaded guilty to leaving the scene of an accident involving death, a Class E felony, and following too closely, a Class C misdemeanor. See T.C.A.§§ 55-10-101, 55-8-124 (2010). The trial court sentenced the Defendant as a Range I, standard offender to two years’ confinement. On appeal, the Defendant contends that the trial court erred (1) by denying judicial diversion, (2) by denying probation, and (3) by sentencing him to two years. We conclude that the trial court properly denied judicial diversion and sentenced the Petitioner to two years but that the court erred by denying probation. We reverse the judgments of the trial court.


JOHNNY TATE v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

R. Todd Mosley, Memphis, Tennessee, for the Petitioner-Appellant, Johnny Tate.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clark B. Thornton, Assistant Attorney General; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Jessica A. Banti, Assistant District Attorney General, for the Appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: MCMULLEN

The Petitioner, Johnny Tate, appeals the Shelby County Criminal Court’s denial of postconviction relief from his convictions for two counts of especially aggravated kidnapping, two counts of aggravated robbery, and one count of aggravated burglary. On appeal, the Petitioner argues that both trial counsel and appellate counsel provided ineffective assistance of counsel by failing to challenge the especially aggravated kidnapping convictions on due process and double jeopardy grounds. Upon review, we affirm the judgment of the postconviction court.


E. LOUIS THOMAS v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

E. Louis Thomas, Whiteville, Tennessee, Pro Se.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; John H. Bledsoe, Assistant Attorney General; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Paul Goodman, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WOODALL

Petitioner, E. Louis Thomas, was convicted by a Shelby County jury for the offense of first degree murder, and he received a sentence of life imprisonment. The conviction was affirmed on appeal, and the Tennessee Supreme Court denied Petitioner’s timely filed pro se application for permission to appeal to that court. See State v. E. Louis Thomas, No. W2008-01360-CCA-R3-CD, 2010 WL 2977874 (Tenn. Crim. App. July 29, 2010) perm. app. denied (Tenn. Jan. 18, 2011). Both of Petitioner’s counsel were allowed to withdraw as counsel of record on August 24, 2010, pursuant to Tenn. Sup. Ct. R. 14. Petitioner filed a petition for post-conviction relief. The earliest it could be considered “filed,” under the “mailbox” rule, was March 22, 2012. The trial court summarily dismissed the petition because it was filed outside the one year statute of limitations. Petitioner appeals, and we affirm the judgment of the post-conviction court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. MICHAEL JASON VANCE
With Concurring Opinion

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Luke A. Evans, Heather G. Parker, and Bill Bullock, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, for the appellant, Michael Jason Vance.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Jennifer L. Smith, Assistant Attorney General; William C. Whitesell, Jr., District Attorney General; Allen Hale, Assistant District Attorney General; and Jude Santana, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WOODALL

Defendant, Michael Vance, was indicted by the Rutherford County Grand Jury for first degree premeditated murder, making a false report to a law enforcement officer, evading arrest, aggravated assault, unlawful possession of a deadly weapon, unlawful possession of a Schedule IV controlled substance, simple possession of marijuana, and possession of drug paraphernalia. The trial court severed counts 1, 2, 3, and 5 from counts 4, 6, 7, and 8, and upon the State’s motion, the trial court subsequently dismissed with prejudice counts 6, 7, and 8 of the indictment. Defendant was convicted following a jury trial of first degree murder, making a false statement to a law enforcement officer, evading arrest, and unlawful possession of a deadly weapon. Following a sentencing hearing, the trial court sentenced Defendant to life imprisonment for felony murder, three years for making a false report, three years for evading arrest, and one year for unlawful possession of a weapon. Defendant’s sentences in counts 2, 3, and 5 were ordered to run concurrently with each other and consecutively to his life sentence. In this direct appeal, Defendant raises the following issues for our review: 1) the trial court erred by denying Defendant’s motion for judgment of acquittal; 2) the trial court erred by allowing into evidence the testimony of the victim’s divorce attorney; 3) the trial court erred by allowing evidence of prior bad acts under Tennessee Rules of Evidence 404(b); 4) the trial court erred by limiting the testimony of the defense mental health expert, Dr. Lynn Zager; 5) the trial court erred by excluding the testimony of the defense mental health expert, Dr. Murray Smith; 6) the trial court erred by allowing the testimony of the State’s mental health expert, Dr. Rokeya Farooque; 7) the trial court erred by allowing into evidence a photo of the victim taken while the victim was living; 8) the trial court erred by allowing into evidence autopsy photographs of the victim; 9) the trial court erred by allowing into evidence a durable power of attorney executed by the victim; 10) the trial court erred by not severing count 1 from the remaining counts; 11) the trial court erred by ordering consecutive sentencing; and 12) the evidence was insufficient to sustain Defendant’s convictions. After a careful review of the record before us, we affirm the judgments of the trial court.


SAMUEL WINKFIELD v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Joseph T. Howell, Jackson, Tennessee, for the appellant, Samuel Winkfield.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General & Reporter; Jeffrey D. Zentner, Assistant Attorney General; Jerry Woodall, District Attorney General; and Shaun A. Brown, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WILLIAMS

The petitioner, Samuel Winkfield, was indicted for first degree (premeditated) murder, first degree (felony) murder, especially aggravated kidnapping, tampering with evidence, and conspiracy to tamper with evidence. During his July 2007 trial, the petitioner was acquitted of the felony murder and conspiracy to tamper with evidence charges. Because the jury was unable to reach a decision regarding the remaining charges, he was retried in January 2008 and convicted of second degree murder, a Class A felony, and tampering with evidence, a Class C felony. The jury was again unable to reach a decision on the kidnapping charge, and this charge was eventually dismissed. On the direct appeal of his convictions, the petitioner challenged the admission into evidence of his testimony from the first trial, the exclusion from evidence of the MySpace page of the State’s chief witness, the sufficiency of the evidence, and his sentence. His convictions and sentences were affirmed. The petitioner then filed a timely post-conviction petition, asserting ineffective assistance of counsel. The petitioner asserted his trial counsel’s performance was deficient in failing to investigate and produce witnesses; in failing to obtain expert testimony; in failing to adequately crossexamine witnesses; and in failing to explore alternative defense strategies. After a hearing, the post-conviction court denied the petition, and the petitioner appeals. Having reviewed the record, we discern no error and affirm the judgment of the post-conviction court.


TN Attorney General Opinions

Authority of District Attorneys General in Municipal Courts

Court: TN Attorney General Opinions

Date: 2013-11-06

Opinion Number: 85


Expunction of Criminal Records Under Tenn. Code Ann. § 40-32-101(g)

Court: TN Attorney General Opinions

Date: 2013-11-06

Opinion Number: 86


County Bond Referendum

Court: TN Attorney General Opinions

Date: 2013-11-06

Opinion Number: 87


Confidentiality of Audit Information Obtained by the Ethics Commission

Court: TN Attorney General Opinions

Date: 2013-11-06

Opinion Number: 88


Commission Recommends 3 for TCA Opening

The Governor’s Commission on Judicial Appointments today recommended 30th Judicial District Chancellor Kenny W. Armstrong of Memphis, Jackson lawyer Brandon O. Gibson with Pentecost & Glenn, and Memphis lawyer Dorothy J. Pounders with PoundersColeman as top candidates to fill the upcoming vacancy on the Court of Appeals, Western Section. The seat will be vacant on Sept. 1, 2014, when Judge David R. Farmer retires, the Administrative Office of Courts reports.


American, US Air Reach Deal with DOJ and States

American Airlines and US Airways Group have reached a settlement with the U.S. Justice Department (DOJ) in an antitrust lawsuit that sought to block the companies’ proposed $17 billion merger, the Dallas Business Journal reports. Under the deal, the airlines will be able to merge but will sell 104 takeoff and landing slots at Reagan National Airport near Washington D.C., 34 slots at LaGuardia Airport in New York and slots at gates at Boston, Chicago, Dallas-Love Field and Los Angeles International. Key slots will be auctioned off to low-cost carriers, the DOJ reported. The airlines also settled a suit brought by Tennessee and five other states, Tennessee Attorney General Bob Cooper reports. Under those terms, the new airline will commit to serve the state’s major airports in Nashville, Memphis, Knoxville, Chattanooga and the Tri-Cities for five years.


95 First Responders Served at Nashville Clinic

Volunteer lawyers in Nashville assisted 95 first responders and their families with wills and other end-of-life planning at a Wills for Heroes clinic this past weekend. The event, held at the Metro Police North Nashville Precinct office, was coordinated by Nashville lawyer Chip Howorth with Smith Cashion & Orr and Clarksville lawyer Brad Carter, chair of the TBA Young Lawyers Division's Wills for Heroes Committee. The YLD has served more than 300 police, firefighters and EMS personnel so far this year. Since the project began in Tennessee in 2008, more than 2,000 heroes have received free wills to protect their families. Learn more about the project and see photos from the event.


Couple Opens New Nashville Firm

The husband-and-wife team of Russell and Julie Cornell has opened the Cornell Law Group in Nashville’s historic Germantown neighborhood. The firm will handle estate planning, probate, and tax matters, and will have a special focus on families with young children. Both Russell and Julie earned their law degrees from Pepperdine University School of Law. Russell went on to earn a master of law in taxation from New York University School of Law. He previously practiced with KPMG’s international corporate tax group. The Cornell Law Group is located at 1312 5th Ave. N., Suite 102, Nashville, TN 37208. It may be reached at (615) 301-1733. Read more in this press release.


Stieglitz Collection Opens at Arkansas Museum

Fisk University’s Alfred Stieglitz Collection, one of Nashville’s most iconic cultural treasures and the subject of much litigation, has officially opened at the Crystal Bridges Museum in northwest Arkansas, The Tennessean reports. It took seven years to resolve how and under what terms the museum would have access to the collection, which includes key works by Georgia O'Keeffe. Under the terms of the final deal, Crystal Bridges agreed to a 50 percent sharing arrangement that will rotate the collection between the two institutions every two years. The art will return to Nashville in time for the historically black university’s 150th anniversary celebration in 2016.


McMillan to Run for Circuit Court

Knoxville lawyer Greg McMillan announced yesterday he will seek the Fourth Circuit Court judgeship that oversees domestic relations issues, Knoxnews reports. The post is currently held by Judge Bill Swann, who has served in the position since 1982. McMillan is special counsel with Lewis King Krieg & Waldrop. He focuses his practice on casualty defense, commercial and civil litigation and domestic relations. The county primary is May 6. The county general election is Aug. 7.


Stokes Expected to Run for Workman Seat

Knoxville lawyer Billy Stokes, who handles personal injury, employment, environmental and government relations law, is expected to announce this week he will seek the Republican nomination for the position being vacated by Knox County Circuit Court Judge Dale Workman, Knoxnews reports. Stokes, a member with Stokes, Williams, Sharp & Davies, previously served as the state commissioner of employment security and as a special assistant to then-governor Don Sundquist. He also coordinated the state’s involvement with the 1996 Olympic Games. If he runs, Stokes will face Ray H. Jenkins, a former chairman of the Knox County Republican Party, who also has announced his candidacy for the seat.


Miller Seeks 3rd Term as Court Clerk

Gayla Harris Miller will run for a third term as Bradley County Circuit and Criminal Court Clerk, the Cleveland Banner reports. In her current role, Miller also oversees the county’s General Sessions, Juvenile, Environmental, Child Support and Order of Protection courts. Prior to taking office as clerk, Miller served as deputy clerk and chief deputy clerk.


AOC Seeking Pro Bono Coordinator

The Administrative Office of the Courts is seeking a pro bono coordinator to work with the Tennessee Supreme Court Access to Justice Commission. The coordinator -- who must be an attorney -- will cultivate, monitor and publicize new pro bono initiatives; maintain a statewide directory of pro bono programs; work with bar associations, attorneys and the judiciary to recruit new pro bono volunteers; and help implement the commission’s strategic plan and draft its annual report. The position is funded by a grant through November 2014, with the possibility of a one-year extension. Those interested should submit a current resume and completed application to human.resources@tncourts.gov. For more information contact Anne-Louise Wirthlin at (615) 741-2687.


Rule 9 Changes Explained at CLE Friday

New disciplinary rules adopted by the Tennessee Supreme Court take effect Jan. 1. Don’t miss the opportunity to learn what the changes mean for you and your practice at a CLE this Friday in Nashville. Join Marisa Combs and Hugh Kendall, co-chairs of the TBA subcommittee that played a large role in putting together the “receiver attorney” provisions adopted by the court, and Brian S. Faughnan, chair of the TBA Ethics Committee, for a guided tour of what’s new, what’s unchanged and what may continue to be controversial going forward. The session starts at 12:30 p.m. and provides three dual hours of credit.


Hatchett is Graduate of UT Law

A news story in yesterday’s issue of TBA Today incorrectly identified the law school that McMinn County lawyer Stephen Hatchett attended. Hatchett, who is running for district attorney general in the 10th Judicial District, graduated from the University of Tennessee College of Law.


TBA Members Now Save with UPS

As a TBA member you now can save up to 36 percent on UPS Next Day Air and up to 18 percent on UPS Ground Shipping! Visit UPS online to learn how this new member benefit can deliver greater efficiencies for your firm. Already a UPS customer? You also are eligible for this discount once you register your account on the UPS' TBA discount site.


 
 

Questions, comments: Email us at TBAToday@tnbar.org

About this publication: Today's News is a compilation of digests of news reports of interest to Tennessee lawyers compiled by TBA staff, links to digested press releases, and occasional stories about the TBA and other activities written by the TBA staff or members. Statements or opinions herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Tennessee Bar Association, its officers, board or staff.


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