Justice Koch to Retire, Lead NSL

Supreme Court Justice William C. Koch Jr. announced today he will retire in July to become dean of the Nashville School of Law. His announcement came at the same time as Dean Joe C. Loser Jr.'s announcement in a letter to students that he will retire in 2014. Justice Koch, who has taught courses at the law school, will have served on the Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court for 30 years at the time of his retirement. “I am grateful for the opportunity to serve Tennessee as a judge,” Koch said. “I am also looking forward to the new opportunities and challenges that await me after I am installed as dean of the Nashville School of Law.” The Administrative Office of the Courts has more.

Today's Opinions

Click on the category of your choice to view summaries of today’s opinions from that court, or other body. A link at the end of each case summary will let you download the full opinion in PDF format.

02 - TN Supreme Court
00 - TN Workers Comp Appeals
00 - TN Supreme Court - Rules
03 - TN Court of Appeals
11 - TN Court of Criminal Appeals
00 - TN Attorney General Opinions
00 - Judicial Ethics Opinions
00 - Formal Ethics Opinions - BPR
00 - TN Supreme Court - Disciplinary Orders









You can obtain full-text versions of the opinions two ways. We recommend that you download the Opinions to your computer and then open them from there. 1) Click the URL at end of each Opinion paragraph below. This should give you the option to download the original document. If not, you may need to right-click on the URL to get the option to save the file to your computer.


TN Supreme Court

ERIK HOOD v. CASEY JENKINS ET AL.

Court: TN Supreme Court

Attorneys:

Michael S. Kelley (at trial and on appeal) and Briton S. Collins (at trial), Knoxville, Tennessee, for the appellant, The Old Line Life Insurance Company of America.

Bruce T. Hill, Sevierville, Tennessee, for the appellee, Erik Hood.

Judge: WADE

The minor beneficiary of a $100,000 life insurance policy filed suit against his financial guardian and the insurance company after the guardian misappropriated the insurance proceeds. The trial court entered judgments in favor of the minor against both the guardian and the insurance company. On appeal by the insurance company, the Court of Appeals affirmed, holding that the insurance company breached its contractual duties by entrusting the proceeds to the guardian. The insurance company then applied for permission to appeal to this Court, contending that it could not be held liable for the loss to the minor because it had relied upon the validity of a juvenile court order of guardianship. Because the insurance company acted in good faith when it relied upon a facially valid court order establishing a financial guardianship in making payment of the life insurance proceeds, it is not liable for breach of contract. The judgment of the Court of Appeals is, therefore, reversed, and the claim against the insurance company is dismissed.


EDITH JOHNSON ET AL. v. MARK C. HOPKINS ET AL.

Court: TN Supreme Court

Attorneys:

Martin Thomas Walsh, Jr., Nader Baydoun, and Stephen C. Knight, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellants, Edith Johnson and Lisa Miller.

James G. King, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellees, Mark C. Hopkins and Milton Williams.

Judge: CLARK

We granted permission to appeal to determine whether a provision of the unlawful detainer statute, which requires that a tenant appealing to the circuit court from a general sessions court’s judgment in favor of a landlord must post a bond equal to one year’s rent of the premises, applies regardless of whether the tenant has surrendered possession of the property prior to the appeal. We hold that the plain language of Tennessee Code Annotated section 29-18-130(b)(2) (2012) does not require that a tenant appealing to the circuit court from an adverse general sessions court judgment in an unlawful detainer action post a bond corresponding to one year’s rent of the premises if the tenant has surrendered possession of the premises prior to the appeal. Accordingly, the cost bond that the tenants have already posted pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated section 27-5-103(a) (2000) is sufficient to perfect their appeal and confer subject matter jurisdiction on the Circuit Court. We affirm the Circuit Court’s judgment denying the landlords’ motion to dismiss and remand the case to the Circuit Court for further proceedings consistent with this decision.


TN Court of Appeals

IN RE: ESTATE OF ROBERT LEE ABBOTT

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Ben Erwin Bennett, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, for the appellants, C. Layne Grimes and Robert A. Tucker.

Clinton H. Swafford, Winchester, Tennessee, for the appellee, Estate of Robert Lee Abbott.

Judge: BENNETT

Residuary legatees appeal from the trial court’s denial of their motion to disallow compensation for executrix and estate’s attorney. Discerning no error, we affirm.


ELIZABETH TIMMONS AUSTIN V. BENJAMIN HOLT GRAY

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Jerrold L. Becker, Knoxville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Elizabeth Timmons Austin.

Rebecca K. McKelvey and Gregory D. Smith, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellee, Benjamin Holt Gray.

Judge: CLEMENT

This appeal arises from the modification of a parenting plan in a post-divorce action. In the initial Permanent Parenting Plan, Mother was designated the primary residential parent of their son. Four years later, Father filed a Petition to Modify the Parenting Plan, alleging that multiple material changes in circumstances had occurred and that it was in the child’s best interest for Father to be the primary residential parent. While the petition was pending, Mother was involuntarily committed to a psychiatric facility; immediately thereafter, on Father’s pendente lite motion, the trial court designated Father as primary residential parent with sole decision-making authority pending further adjudication. Father then amended his Petition to enumerate additional material changes. Some eight months later, the trial court conducted a trial. The court found that Mother’s mental health, Mother’s attitude and untoward actions directed at Father, the child’s manipulation and power struggles with his parents; the child’s enrollment in an out-of-state boarding school, and multiple other factors demonstrated that a material change in circumstances had occurred and that it was in their son’s best interest for Father to serve as the primary residential parent with sole decisionmaking authority. Mother appeals claiming the trial court erred in determining that a material change in circumstances existed and that a modification was in the child’s best interest. We affirm.


REGINALD TUTTON v. TENNESSEE BOARD OF PROBATION AND PAROLE, ET AL.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Reginald Tutton, Henning, Tennessee, Pro Se.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter, Bill Young, Solicitor General, Jennifer L. Brenner, Senior Counsel, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellees, Tennessee Board of Probation and Parole, et al.

Judge: COTTRELL

Inmate was serving a 47-year sentence for rape and attempted first degree murder. Inmate had a parole hearing in 2011, when he had 19 years of his sentence left to serve. Parole was denied, and Inmate’s next parole hearing was scheduled to take place six years later. Inmate challenged Parole Board’s decision to defer his next parole hearing for six years. The trial court held the Board acted lawfully in deferring Inmate’s next parole hearing for six years. We affirm the trial court’s judgment on appeal. Board members serve for staggered six-year terms, and Inmate will not be denied the opportunity for new Board members to review his request for parole six years from the date of his last hearing.


TN Court of Criminal Appeals

IN RE AMERICAN BONDING COMPANY

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

David King (at hearing) and Geoffrey Coston (at hearing and on appeal), Franklin, Tennessee, for the appellant, American Bonding Company.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General & Reporter; Brent C. Cherry, Senior Counsel; Kim R. Helper, District Attorney General; and Michael Fahey and Derek K. Smith, Assistant District Attorneys General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WILLIAMS

Amir Karshenas, doing business as American Bonding Company, appeals his suspension as a bondsperson in the Twenty-First Judicial District. Because the trial court did not provide the appellant notice pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated section 40-11-125(b) (Supp. 2011), we vacate the suspension and remand for further proceedings consistent with this opinion


GEORGE WILLIAM BRADY v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

George William Brady, Mountain City, Tennessee, pro se.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; and Kyle Hixson, Assistant Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WITT

The petitioner, George William Brady, appeals from the order of the Sevier County Criminal Court dismissing “all pro se actions and pleadings” filed in that court. Although the petitioner filed, and the criminal court denied, a plethora of pro se motions, the petitioner challenges only the denial of his motion to correct the judgment. Discerning no error, we affirm.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. ARCHIE ELLIOTT, also known as ARCHIE ELLIOTT, III

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Latonya Burrow, Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellant, Archie Elliott, also known as Archie Elliott, III.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; David H. Findley, Senior Counsel; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Paul Hagerman, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: GLENN

The defendant, Archie Elliott, also known as Archie Elliott, III, was indicted for two counts of aggravated cruelty to animals while he was employed by the Memphis Animal Shelter. He entered open pleas of guilty to these offenses and was sentenced, in each count, to two years confinement, with the sentences to be served concurrently. On appeal, he asserts that the trial court erred in both the length and manner of service of the sentences, which were to be served, as a Range I, standard offender, at 30%; that the court showed bias in statements regarding the court’s feelings regarding animals; and that the court erred in weighing the impact of letters opposing alternative sentencing. Following our review, we affirm the judgments of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. GWENDOLYN HAGERMAN

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Stephen M. Wallace, District Public Defender (on appeal); Leslie S. Hale, Assistant District Public Defender (on appeal); Steve McEwen, Mountain City, Tennessee (on appeal); and Frank L. Slaughter, Jr., Bristol, Tennessee (at trial) for the appellant, Gwendolyn Hagerman.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Cameron L. Hyder, Assistant Attorney General; Barry Staubus, District Attorney General; and Amber Massengill, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: TIPTON

The Defendant was found guilty by a Sullivan County Criminal Court jury of five counts of rape of a child involving the daughter of the Defendant’s then-girlfriend. See T.C.A. § 39- 13-522 (1997). She was sentenced as a Range I offender to twenty years for each conviction to be served at 100% as a child rapist. The trial court ordered partial consecutive sentencing, for an effective sixty-year sentence. In the Defendant’s previous appeal, she contended that: (1) the evidence is insufficient to support the convictions; (2) there was a material variance between the presentment, the bill of particulars, the election of offenses, and the proof; (3) the trial court erred in denying her motion to dismiss the charges due to pre-accusation delay; (4) the court erred in declining to conduct an in camera review of Department of Children’s Services (DCS) records; and (5) the court erred in imposing consecutive sentences. State v. Gwendolyn Hagerman, No. E2011-00233-CCA-R3-CD (Tenn. Crim. App. June 4, 2013), perm. app. granted, case remanded (Tenn. Nov. 13, 2013). After we affirmed the Defendant’s convictions, the Tennessee Supreme Court granted her application for permission to appeal and remanded the case in order for this court to order that the record be supplemented with the victim’s DCS records and for reconsideration of the case in light of the supplemented record. State v. Gwendolyn Hagerman, No. E2011-00233-CCA-R3-SC (Tenn. Nov. 13, 2013) (per curiam) (order). Having ordered that the record be supplemented and having reviewed the DCS records, we affirm the judgments of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. LESLIE DAWN HURST

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Charles C. Harrison, Jr., Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, for the appellant, Leslie Dawn Hurst.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Meredith DeVault, Senior Counsel; James B. Dunn, District Attorney General; and Ashley McDermott, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: THOMAS

The Defendant, Leslie Dawn Hurst, pled guilty to seven counts of theft of property valued at $500 or less, a Class A misdemeanor; one count of possession of drug paraphernalia, a Class A misdemeanor; and one count of failure to appear, a Class E felony. See Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 39-14-103, -14-105, -16-609, -17-425. The trial court imposed an effective sentence of four years, eleven months, and twenty-six days to be served in confinement. In this appeal as of right, the Defendant contends (1) that the trial court erred in denying her request for alternative sentencing and (2) that the trial court erred by imposing partial consecutive sentences. Following our review, we affirm the judgments of the trial court.


JONATHAN WESLEY STEPHENSON v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Jonathan Wesley Stephenson, Nashville, Tennessee, pro se.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General & Reporter; Deshea Dulany Faughn, Assistant Attorney General; Victor S. Johnson, III, District Attorney General; and Dan Hamm, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WILLIAMS

The petitioner, Jonathan Wesley Stephenson, appeals the dismissal of his habeas corpus petition challenging the legality of his sentence and conviction for conspiracy to commit first degree murder. After a thorough review of the record, we conclude that the petition was properly dismissed for failure to abide by the procedural requirements of Tennessee Code Annotated section 29-21-107(b)(4), and we affirm the judgment of the habeas corpus court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. AARON TATE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Janine N. Oleaga (on appeal), and Juni Ganguli (at trial), Memphis, Tennessee, for the Defendant-Appellant, Aaron Tate.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Benjamin A. Ball, Assistant Attorney General; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Rob Ratton, Assistant District Attorney General, for the Appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: MCMULLEN

The Defendant-Appellant, Aaron Tate, was convicted by a Shelby County jury of one count of attempted especially aggravated robbery; one count of especially aggravated burglary; one count of employment of a firearm during a felony offense; one count of especially aggravated kidnapping; one count of aggravated kidnapping; two counts of aggravated assault; and one count of facilitation to commit aggravated assault. The trial court sentenced Tate as a Range II, multiple offender and ordered each of his sentences to be served consecutively, for an effective sentence of one-hundred-thirty-eight years’ imprisonment. In this appeal, Tate argues that the jury was not provided with an instruction consistent with State v. White, 362 S.W.3d 559 (Tenn. 2012); therefore, his “convictions for especially aggravated kidnapping and aggravated kidnapping offend due process.” He further argues that the trial court imposed an excessive sentence. Upon our review, we conclude that the absence of an instruction pursuant to White was harmless beyond a reasonable doubt as to Tate’s convictions for attempted especially aggravated robbery, aggravated burglary, and facilitation of aggravated assault. However, the lack of the White instruction was reversible error as to his convictions for aggravated assault charged in counts six and seven. Accordingly, we reverse Tate’s kidnapping convictions charged in counts four and five and remand the matter for a new trial as to those offenses. We modify count two and reduce the especially aggravated burglary conviction to aggravated burglary and remand for resentencing on this conviction. We reverse Tate’s conviction for employing a firearm during the commission of a dangerous felony offense and remand for a new trial on count three. In all other respects, the judgments of the trial court are affirmed.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. RODNEY TURNER

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Robert C. Brooks (on appeal) and Coleman W. Garrett (at trial), Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellant, Rodney Turner.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Jeffrey D. Zentner, Assistant Attorney General; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Robert William Ratton, III, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: THOMAS

The Defendant, Rodney Turner, was convicted by a jury of two counts of attempted first degree murder, a Class A felony, and one count of employing a firearm during the commission of a dangerous felony, a Class C felony. See Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 39-12-101, -13-202, -17-1324. The trial court sentenced the Defendant to concurrent sentences of forty years for both counts of attempted first degree murder. The trial court also imposed a tenyear sentence for the employment of a firearm conviction and ordered that six years of that sentence be served at one hundred percent. The trial court ordered that the sentence for the employment of a firearm conviction be served consecutively to the sentences for the attempted first degree murder convictions, for a total effective sentence of fifty years. In this appeal as of right, the Defendant contends that the trial court erred by not requiring the State to produce a prior statement made by one of the State’s witnesses. Following our review, we affirm the judgments of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. MICHAEL WADDELL

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Claiborne H. Ferguson (on appeal) and John L. Dolan (at trial), Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellant, Michael Waddell.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Benjamin A. Ball, Senior Counsel, Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Abby Wallace and Stephanie Johnson, Assistant District Attorneys General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: OGLE

A Shelby County Criminal Court Jury convicted the appellant of second degree murder. The trial court sentenced him as a Range II, multiple offender to thirty-seven years in the Tennessee Department of Correction. On appeal, the appellant contends that the evidence is not sufficient to sustain his conviction of second degree murder. He argues that the jury should have found that he was acting in self-defense or, in the alternative, that he committed voluntary manslaughter. Upon review, we affirm the judgment of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. ARCHIE TYRONE WILSON

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Timothy Boxx, Assistant District Public Defender, Dyersburg, Tennessee, for appellant, Archie Tyrone Wilson.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Brent C. Cherry, Assistant Attorney General; Phillip Bivens, District Attorney General, and Lance Webb, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: SMITH

Appellant, Archie Tyrone Wilson, was in custody in the State of Tennessee. In July 2012, the State of Florida submitted a request under the Interstate Compact on Detainers for custody of Appellant in connection with a charge of sexual battery. Appellant requested a hearing. At the conclusion of the hearing, the trial court ordered his transfer to Florida for prosecution. On appeal, Appellant argues that the trial court erred. After a thorough review of the record on appeal, we conclude that the trial court did not err. Therefore, we affirm the trial court’s order of transfer.


LORENZA ZACKERY V. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Chelsea Nicholson, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Lorenza Zackery.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; David H. Findley, Senior Counsel; Victor S. Johnson, III, District Attorney General; and Sharon Reddick, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WILLIAMS

The petitioner, Lorenza Zackery, appeals the denial of his petition for post-conviction relief. The petitioner pled guilty to two counts of rape of a child and received concurrent sentences of twenty years. He contends that his plea was not knowingly and voluntarily entered. He claims he was coerced into accepting the plea by trial counsel’s actions and deficient performance. Following review of the record, we affirm the denial of relief.


MBA Elects New Officers, Presents Awards at Annual Meeting

Allen Malone was awarded the W.J. Michael Cody Pro Bono Attorney of the Year Award as part of the Memphis Bar Association's annual meeting last week. Also honored at the event were Stacie Winkler, who was presented the Sam A. Myar Jr. Memorial Award, and Jim Garts, who was honored with the Judge Jerome Turner Lawyer’s Lawyer Award. Linda Warren Seely transferred the gavel to new 2014 president Kirk Caraway, while Tommy Parker assumed the post of vice president and Shea Wellford was named secretary/treasurer. Finally, the results of elections for the Board of Directors were announced. Newly elected directors are Betsy Chance, Dean DeCandia, Asia Diggs, Maureen Holland, Carrie Kerley and Andre Mathis. View photos from the event here.


Sumner County Approves New General Sessions Court Judgeship

Sumner County leaders approved the creation of a new General Sessions Court judgeship Monday, the Tennessean reports. General Sessions Judge Jim Hunter said the current caseload is “too much of a load on the system” leaving the county with few options. The General Assembly will take up the private act request when it reconvenes Jan. 14. If the state gives its OK, the commission must approve it again with a two-thirds vote by September, and appoint a judge between Sept. 1, 2014 and Sept. 1, 2015.


Rhea County to Establish Drug Court

The Rhea County Commission voted Tuesday to establish an alcohol and drug treatment program as an alternative to prison for people convicted of certain drug offenses. Funding for the program will come from D.U.I fines collected in the Rhea County Circuit and Sessions Courts and federal grants. The Chattanoogan has more.


Nashville Jail Flooded

A pipe burst in the intake area of the Davidson County Criminal Justice Center early Tuesday morning. Spokeswoman Karla West says the flooding was contained to the intake area and operations were not interrupted. Authorities brought in a mobile booking unit so that newly arrested inmates could still be entered into the system. The Tennessean has more.


Executions Down Across the U.S.

A new report shows that a shortage of lethal injection chemicals has contributed to declining use of capital punishment in the United States. With 39 executions this year, it is only the second time in the past two decades the annual number of inmates put to death has dropped below 40, WCYB reports. Active death-penalty states have been scrambling to find new lethal injection protocols after European-based manufacturers banned U.S. prisons from using their drugs in executions. Various state and federal courts, including those in Tennessee, have postponed some planned executions until issues surrounding the new protocols are resolved.


Court to Review Five End-of-Year Cases

The Tennessee Supreme Court has granted review of five end-of-year cases. The four civil cases involve a child custody issue, a real estate contract dispute, independent contractor premises liability question, and a forfeiture of real property in a child pornography matter. The criminal case is regarding the waiver of a jury instruction on lesser included offenses. The Raybin Perky Hot List has a summary and forecast of each case.


Former Memphis Federal Bar President Dies

James J. McMahon died Tuesday in Memphis. He was 72. A graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Law, McMahon practiced as an IRS estate and gift tax attorney for several years, and began private practice in 1978. McMahon served as past president of the Federal Bar Association in Memphis and as chairman of the Tax, Probate and Trust Section of the Tennessee Bar Association. Visitation will be held Saturday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Memphis Funeral Home, with services immediately following. Burial will follow in Edmondson Cemetery in Southaven, Miss.


Harwell Predicts Wine in Grocery Stores Will Pass

Speaker of the House Beth Harwell predicts that the bill to allow wine in grocery stores will pass in 2014. The bill to let supermarkets, pharmacies, convenience stores and other retailers with beer licenses place wine on their shelves — provided voters agree through local referendums — was sent to the Senate, but got tied up in a House committee during the 2013 legislative session by a single vote.


UT Law to Host Open House Jan. 11

The University of Tennessee College of Law is hosting an open house for prospective students on Jan. 11 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet and interact with current law students, attend a simulated first-year class, ask questions of admissions, financial aid and career advisors and take a tour of UT Law's state-of-the-art facility. For more information, email lawadmit@utk.edu or call admissions at (865) 974-4131.


Davidson County Attorney Suspended

The Tennessee Supreme Court has suspended the law license of John E. Clemmons based upon his plea of guilty to serious crimes of theft in an amount over $60,000, aggravated perjury and TennCare fraud. Download the BPR notice.


Fastcase: Free Premium-Level Legal Research

Have you been using your unlimited access to online legal research through Fastcase? It comes free with your TBA membership. Court opinions are available from all 50 states, the U.S. Supreme Court, all federal district and appellate courts, and the U.S. bankruptcy courts. Framed statutes, regulations, court rules and constitutions from all 50 states also are free. Log in through your TBA.org account and start saving money on your online legal research.


Sen. Tracey Faces Complaint, Receives Endorsement

A Shelbyville resident filed a formal complaint against State Sen. Jim Tracy, alleging he broke Tennessee campaign laws and reporting procedures by holding a pancake breakfast for constituents in Murfreesboro shortly before he launched his bid for Congress last December. According to the Tennessean, state filings show that Jim Tracy for State Senate spent more than $40,000 on the event, billed as an opportunity to meet the Shelbyville Republican and make donations to Toys for Tots. The complaint was filed with the state’s Registry of Election Finance on Nov. 27 and will be taken up at a meeting in January.

A day earlier Tracy had received a big endorsement from the Citizens United Political Victory Fund in his GOP challenge to Fourth Congressional District Congressman Scott DesJarlais. The conservative group formerly supported DesJarlais but said in a statement that it “can no longer do so because he does not share our conservative values." The Chattanooga Times Free Press has more.


 
 

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About this publication: Today's News is a compilation of digests of news reports of interest to Tennessee lawyers compiled by TBA staff, links to digested press releases, and occasional stories about the TBA and other activities written by the TBA staff or members. Statements or opinions herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Tennessee Bar Association, its officers, board or staff.


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