Comments Sought on 2 Bankruptcy Court Reappointments

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reports that current terms of U.S. Bankruptcy Judges David Stewart Kennedy and Keith M. Lundin will expire on Sept. 30, 2014, and that it is considering whether to reappoint the judges to new 14-year terms of office. Members of the bar and the public are invited to submit comments for the court’s consideration in the reappointment process. All comments are confidential and should be directed to Clarence Maddox, Circuit Executive, 503 Potter Stewart United States Courthouse, 100 E. Fifth St., Cincinnati, OH 45202. All comments must be received by Feb. 5, 2014. For additional information contact the Office of the Circuit Executive at (513) 564-7200.

Today's Opinions

Click on the category of your choice to view summaries of today’s opinions from that court, or other body. A link at the end of each case summary will let you download the full opinion in PDF format.

04 - TN Supreme Court
00 - TN Workers Comp Appeals
00 - TN Supreme Court - Rules
02 - TN Court of Appeals
09 - TN Court of Criminal Appeals
00 - TN Attorney General Opinions
00 - Judicial Ethics Opinions
00 - Formal Ethics Opinions - BPR
00 - TN Supreme Court - Disciplinary Orders









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TN Supreme Court

SUPREME COURT OF TENNESSEE SUPREME COURT DISCRETIONARY APPEALS Grants & Denials List

Court: TN Supreme Court


JUAN ALBERTO BLANCO GARCIA v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Supreme Court

Attorneys:

Matt Maniatis, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Juan Alberto Blanco Garcia.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; William E. Young, Solicitor General; James E. Gaylord, Assistant Attorney General; Lisa Zavogiannis, District Attorney General; and Thomas J. Miner, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: CLARK

In this post-conviction proceeding the petitioner alleged ineffective assistance of counsel based upon trial counsel’s failure to advise him of the immigration consequences of his plea as required by Padilla v. Kentucky, 559 U.S. 356 (2010). The petitioner also alleged that his plea was involuntary and unknowing because the trial court failed to comply with Tennessee Rule of Criminal Procedure 11(b)(1)(J). The post-conviction trial court denied post- conviction relief, and the Court of Criminal Appeals affirmed. We conclude that the record fully supports the post-conviction court’s findings that trial counsel advised the petitioner he would be deported upon pleading guilty and that his guilty plea could have an adverse effect upon his ability to return legally to the United States. We also agree with the Court of Criminal Appeals that the trial court’s failure to comply with Rule 11(b)(1)(J) was harmless beyond a reasonable doubt because the proof shows that the petitioner was aware his guilty plea would result in his deportation and could adversely affect his ability to return legally to the United States. Accordingly, we affirm the judgment of the Court of Criminal Appeals upholding the post-conviction court’s denial of post-conviction relief.


ZOYLE JONES v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Supreme Court

Attorneys:

Pamela S. Lorch, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, State of Tennessee.

Jeffery Scott Frensley, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellee, Zoyle Jones.

Judge: LEE

The issue presented in this case is one of first impression: whether cabinet-level state executive officials are absolutely immune from defamation claims arising out of statements made while performing their official duties. An employee of the Tennessee Department of Correction (“TDOC”) was disciplined for double-billing claims for his job-related travel expenses to both the state and a private organization. After the TDOC Commissioner responded to media inquiries about the employee’s demotion for violating the state’s travel billing policy, the employee sued the State of Tennessee and the TDOC for defamation. The State moved for summary judgment, asserting that the TDOC Commissioner had an absolute privilege to make the allegedly defamatory statements to the media. The Tennessee Claims Commission denied the State’s motion. Upon review, we hold that the State is absolutely immune from the employee’s defamation claims that relate to the TDOC Commissioner’s statements in response to media inquiries about the employee’s demotion. This ruling allows cabinet-level officials to perform their governmental duties free from legal harassment and uninhibited by the fear of potential lawsuits arising out of their job-related speech. It also furthers the vital free-expression principle that the public has a right to receive critical information from the government and its public officials, who must be free to speak with complete candor about matters of public importance. The judgment of the Claims Commission is reversed.


WESTGATE SMOKY MOUNTAINS AT GATLINBURG v. BURNS PHILLIPS, COMMISSIONER, TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT ET AL.

Court: TN Supreme Court

Attorneys:

Gregory C. Logue and J. Keith Coates, Jr., Knoxville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Westgate Smoky Mountains at Gatlinburg.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; William E. Young, Solicitor General; Derek C. Jumper, Assistant Attorney General; Joseph F. Whalen, Associate Solicitor General; for the appellee, Burns Phillips, Commissioner, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

Gregory F. Coleman and Mark E. Silvey, Knoxville, Tennessee, for the appellee, Cynthia L. Vukich-Daw.

Judge: HOLDER

The claimant is a licensed time-share salesperson who sold time-share interests at a resort owned by Westgate in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. When resort management terminated the business relationship, the claimant filed for state unemployment benefits with the Department of Labor and Workforce Development. The initial agency decision, the Appeals Tribunal, and the Board of Review affirmed an award of benefits to the claimant, concluding that a time-share salesperson is not a licensed real estate agent and therefore is not subject to the Tennessee Employment Security Law’s exclusion for services performed by a “qualified real estate agent.” Westgate sought judicial review of the Board’s decision. The chancery court reversed, finding that a time-share salesperson is a “licensed real estate agent” and that the claimant was ineligible for unemployment benefits as a “qualified real estate agent.” The Court of Appeals reversed the chancery court’s findings, and Westgate appealed. We reverse the Court of Appeals and reinstate the judgment of the chancery court.


TN Court of Appeals

REID R. CRUMPTON v. PATRICIA G. GRISSOM, ET AL.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Shannon M. Holland, Knoxville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Reid R. Crumpton.

Ellis A. “Sandy” Sharp, Jon M. Cope, and Zachary B. Tenry, Knoxville, Tennessee, for the appellee, Mary Bea Corbitt.

Judge: SWINEY

Reid R. Crumpton (“Plaintiff”) sued Patricia G. Grissom (“Affiliate Broker”), Ashley Carpenter, and Mary Bea Corbitt (“Managing Broker”) in connection with a real estate sales contract for real property containing both a house and a business. The Managing Broker filed a motion for summary judgment asserting, in part, that she was not personally involved in Plaintiff’s purchase of the real property at issue and had no knowledge of the details of the transaction, and, therefore, could not be held liable for the actions of the Affiliate Broker. After a hearing, the Trial Court entered an order granting the Managing Broker summary judgment and making its judgment final pursuant to Tenn. R. Civ. P. 54.02. Plaintiff appeals the grant of summary judgment to the Managing Broker. We find and hold that Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 62-13-101, et seq. creates a duty on the part of the Managing Broker, and that the Managing Broker failed to show that she met the standard of care sufficient to satisfy her duty. We, therefore, reverse the grant of summary judgment to the Managing Broker, and remand this case for further proceedings.


ROBBIN MORROW ELLIOTT ET AL. v. MICHAEL R. MORROW

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

H. Chris Trew, Athens, Tennessee, for the appellants, Robbin Morrow Elliott, Larry D. Morrow, and Joyce Elliott.

D. Mitchell Bryant, Athens, Tennessee, for the appellee, Michael R. Morrow.

Judge: FRIERSON

In this real property dispute, the plaintiffs, three siblings, brought a complaint against the defendant landowner, a fourth sibling, alleging that he was trespassing on an approximately 15-acre parcel of land deeded to them by their mother and requesting that the trial court declare the plaintiffs as the rightful owners of the disputed acreage. Following a bench trial, the trial court dismissed the plaintiffs’ complaint, finding that despite an ambiguity in the relevant deed, the parties’ mother intended to convey the disputed acreage to the defendant as part of a larger 28.33-acre parcel in 1988. The plaintiffs appeal. Discerning no error, we affirm.


TN Court of Criminal Appeals

BILLY JACKSON COFFELT v. STATE OF TENNESSEE and JERRY LESTER, WARDEN

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Billy Jackson Coffelt, Henning, Tennessee, Pro Se.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clark Bryan Thornton, Assistant Attorney General; and D. Michael Dunavant, District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: TIPTON

The Petitioner, Billy Jackson Coffelt, appeals the Lauderdale County Circuit Court’s summary dismissal of his petition for habeas corpus relief from his 1983 conviction for robbery by the use of a deadly weapon and resulting life sentence after being found to be a habitual criminal offender. The Petitioner contends that the trial court erred by summarily denying relief. We affirm the judgment of the trial court.


ANTHONY DEAN v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Anthony Dean, Whiteville, Tennessee, Pro Se.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Sophia S. Lee, Senior Counsel; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Kate Edmond, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: GLENN

The petitioner, Anthony Dean, appeals the summary dismissal of his petition for writ of error coram nobis. After review, we affirm the judgment of the trial court dismissing the petition.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. DOMINIC ERIC FRAUSTO

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Robert L. Jolley, Jr. and Jennifer L. Gower (on appeal), Knoxville, Tennessee; Martha J. Yoakum, District Public Defender; and Dale Potter and Larry Bryant, Assistant District Public Defenders (at trial), Jacksboro, Tennessee, for the appellant, Dominic Eric Frausto.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Nicholas W. Spangler, Assistant Attorney General; Lori Phillips-Jones, District Attorney General; and Tracy Tipton Jenkins, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: TIPTON

The Defendant, Dominic Eric Frausto, was convicted by a Union County Criminal Court jury of two counts of aggravated sexual battery, Class B felonies. See T.C.A. § 39-13-504 (2010). The trial court merged the convictions and sentenced him as a Range I, standard offender to twelve years’ confinement. On appeal, the Defendant contends that (1) the evidence is insufficient to support his convictions because the State did not prove the corpus delicti, (2) the trial court erred in failing to comply with Tennessee Criminal Procedure Rule 24 during jury selection, and (3) the trial court erred in sentencing him to the maximum in the range. We affirm the judgment of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. DAVID WAYNE GROSS

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Stephen M. Wallace, District Public Defender; Joseph F.Harrison, Assistant Public Defender, for the appellant, David Wayne Gross.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Jeffrey D. Zentner, Assistant Attorney General; Barry Staubus, District Attorney General; and James Goodwin, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WILLIAMS

The defendant, David Wayne Gross, appeals the sentencing decision denying him an alternative sentence. The defendant pled guilty to violating a habitual traffic offender order, two counts of theft over $1000, two counts of identity theft, two counts of forgery, and theft under $500. Pursuant to the plea agreement, the defendant received an effective four-year sentence and was allowed to petition the court for an alternative sentence. A hearing was held, after which the trial court ordered that the sentence be served in incarceration. After review of the record, we affirm the denial of alternative sentencing.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. CHARLES MARTIN, JR.

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

M. Keith Davis, Dunlap, Tennessee, for appellant, Charles Martin, Jr.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clark B. Thornton, Senior Counsel; J. Michael Taylor, District Attorney General; and David O. McGovern, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: THOMAS

The Defendant, Charles Martin, Jr., pled guilty to one count of kidnapping, as a Range II, multiple offender, with an agreed upon eight-year sentence. The trial court determined the manner of service, and the Defendant was placed in the Community Corrections Program and ordered to serve 180 days in confinement. A violation warrant was filed. Thereafter, the trial court revoked the sentence and ordered the Defendant to serve the balance of his sentence in confinement based upon the Defendant’s commission of new crimes and his consumption of alcohol while at a local grocery store. The Defendant appeals the order of total incarceration. Upon review, we affirm the judgment of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. LAWRENCE D. RALPH, JR.

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Lauren Zechman-Denney, for the Defendant-Appellant, Lawrence D. Ralph, Jr.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Tracy L. Bradshaw, Assistant Attorney General; Lisa Zavorgiannis, District Attorney General; and Darrell Julian, Assistant District Attorney General, for the Appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: MCMULLEN

The Defendant, Lawrence D. Ralph, Jr., was convicted by a Warren County jury for violation of the Motor Vehicle Habitual Offenders Act; driving with a revoked license, fifth offense; reckless endangerment with a deadly weapon; reckless driving; and evading arrest.1 The Defendant received an effective sentence of eight years in confinement. The Defendant filed a motion for a new trial, which was denied by the trial court, and subsequently filed a timely notice of appeal to this Court. After concluding that we lacked jurisdiction, we dismissed the appeal. See State v. Lawrence D. Ralph, No. M2010-00195-CCA-R3-CD, 2011 WL 766941 (Tenn. Crim. App. March 4, 2011). The Defendant then filed a petition for post- conviction relief, alleging ineffective assistance of counsel. The post-conviction court granted the Defendant a delayed appeal to appeal issues raised during trial and in his motion for new trial. In this appeal, the Defendant argues that the evidence is insufficient to sustain his conviction for reckless endangerment with a deadly weapon and that his sentence is excessive and violates double jeopardy. Upon review, we affirm the judgments of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. ANTOINE D. REDEEMER

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Gregory D. Smith (on appeal) and Lance Miller (at revocation hearing), Clarksville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Antoine D. Redeemer.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clarence E. Lutz, Assistant Attorney General; John Wesley Carney, Jr., District Attorney General; and Helen Young, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: TIPTON

The Defendant, Antoine D. Redeemer, appeals the Montgomery County Circuit Court’s order revoking his effective eight-year community corrections sentence for his aggravated burglary and robbery convictions. On appeal, the Defendant contends that the trial court abused its discretion by revoking his community corrections sentences and ordering him to serve his sentences in confinement. We affirm the judgments of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. PATRICK SCOTT RILEY

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Samuel A. Wooden, Nashville, Tennessee, for the Defendant-Appellant, Patrick Scott Riley.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Michelle L. Consiglio-Young, Assistant Attorney General; Victor S. Johnson, III, District Attorney General; and Sarah Davis, Assistant District Attorney General, for the Appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: MCMULLEN

The Defendant-Appellant, Patrick Scott Riley, appeals from the Davidson County Criminal Court’s order revoking his community corrections sentence. He previously entered a guilty plea to burglary and received an eight-year suspended sentence. On appeal, Riley argues that the trial court unreasonably conditioned his community corrections sentence on the requirement that he “get off any and all opiates or other medications that have any addictive qualities” within sixty days of the September 5, 2012 sentencing hearing. Upon review, we conclude that the issue challenging the conditions of his community corrections sentence is waived by Riley’s failure to timely appeal the trial court’s initial order. We further conclude that the trial court did not abuse its discretion by revoking Riley’s community corrections sentence and ordering his original eight-year sentence to be served in confinement. Accordingly, we affirm the judgment of the trial court.


ROBERT CHARLES TAYLOR v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Kenneth L. Miller, Cleveland, Tennessee, for the appellant, Robert Charles Taylor.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Lacy Wilber, Assistant Attorney General; R. Steven Bebb, District Attorney General; and Cynthia A. LeCroy-Schemel, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: TIPTON

The Petitioner, Robert Charles Taylor, appeals the Bradley County Criminal Court’s denial of his petition for post-conviction relief from his 2006 conviction for attempt to commit rape of a child. The Petitioner was originally sentenced to thirty years’ confinement, but the court granted post-conviction relief and reduced his sentence to twelve years. The Petitioner contends that he was prejudiced by (1) counsel’s failure to ensure his presence during jury selection, (2) counsel’s failure to request a hearing pursuant to Momon v. State, 18 S.W.3d 152 (Tenn. 1999), and (3) the trial judge’s entry into the jury room during deliberations. We reverse the judgement of the trial court and vacate the conviction because the Petitioner was denied his right to be present for the jury selection process. 


TBA Closing for Christmas Holiday

The Tennessee Bar Association will be closed on Tuesday, Dec. 24, and Wednesday, Dec. 25, in observance of the Christmas holiday. The office will reopen on Thursday, Dec. 27, at 8 a.m. As always, the TBA website has plenty of information and access to hundreds of continuing legal education programs available 24/7. Still need live CLE credit? The TBA will offer its annual Year End CLE Blast on Dec. 26, 27, 30 and 31. Programs will run from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. each day.


Court Adopts New Standard for Concurrent Sentences

The Tennessee Supreme Court on Friday adopted a new standard to guide appellate court review of decisions that impose consecutive sentences for multiple convictions. The decision came in the case of James Allen Pollard, who was found guilty of first-degree murder and aggravated robbery. The trial court imposed consecutive sentences of life in prison for the murder and 18 years for the robbery. The appellate court affirmed the conviction but instructed the trial court to identify the factors that supported imposition of consecutive sentences. The Supreme Court upheld that approach, directing trial courts to identify a specific evidentiary basis for “stacking” sentences. It also ruled that if a lower court finds an appropriate basis for consecutive sentences, appellate courts must find an abuse of discretion to justify overturning the decision.


Court Clarifies Responsibility for Immigration Notifications

The Tennessee Supreme Court today upheld the conviction of a man who said he was not aware that his guilty plea would result in his deportation or that it would adversely affect his future eligibility to return legally to the United States. The court made the ruling after finding that the defendant’s lawyer had provided the appropriate notification even though the trial court did not discuss the consequences or inquire whether the attorney had done so. However, the court declined to decide in general whether the federal or state constitution requires courts to advise a person pleading guilty of the immigration consequences of the plea. In this particular case, the court said the lack of a court notice was “harmless” because the attorney had already provided the information.


Cabinet Officials Have Absolute Privilege in Defamation Suits

The Tennessee Supreme Court unanimously ruled today that cabinet-level state officials have absolute immunity from defamation claims for speech that arises out of the performance of their official duties. The ruling came in the case of Zoyle Jones, a former employee of the Tennessee Department of Correction, who sued the state for defamation after the former commissioner of the department spoke to the media about Jones’s demotion. Writing for the court, Justice Sharon G. Lee explained that a rule of absolute immunity furthers two important policy considerations: ensuring that cabinet-level state officials can fulfill their public duties and inform the public about the functioning of government free from the harassment of lawsuits.


Suit Alleges Police, City Knew About Untested Rape Kits

A lawsuit filed Friday in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee by an anonymous sexual assault victim takes aim at various issues associated with the city's failure to process rape kits. The suit alleges that the Memphis Police Department knew that the victim’s rape kit – and maybe as many as 15,000 others – were not being tested and that the practice was “ratified by multiple policymakers” within the department. It also claims the city “knew about…the conduct and facilitated it, approved it, condoned it and/or turned a blind eye to it.” The suit argues that the lack of processing rape kits violates the equal protection clause and seeks class-action status for other victims. The Memphis Daily News has more on the story.


Hamilton County Gets New Rules of Court

The five Hamilton County General Sessions Court judges have collaborated to publish the first revision of local court rules since 1966, the Chattanoogan reports. Judges Christie Sell, David Bales, Clarence Shattuck, Lila Statom and Gary Starnes drafted the comprehensive rewrite to achieve "uniformity and to inform all persons having business before the court of the requirements regarding procedures, dress-code and appropriate conduct." The rules take effect Jan. 1, 2014. Copies are available in the General Sessions Court Office on the second floor of the City County Courts Building and are reprinted in the paper’s story.


MALS Elects Board Officers

The board of directors of Memphis Area Legal Services (MALS) elected new officers last week. Each will serve a one-year term. They are: President Jonathan Hancock with Baker Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz; Vice President Mary Wolff with Wolff Ardis; Treasurer Clayton Purdom with Martin, Tate, Morrow & Marston; and Secretary Rose Benson with Porter-Leath.


Probation Fees Used to Help Local Community

It is the season for giving, and on Friday, three Washington County judges were handing out money. WCYB News reports that Sessions Court Judges James Nidiffer, Robert Lincoln and Robert Arnold gave out more than $11,000 in grants to four area non-profits. The money comes from the First Tennessee Human Resource Agency, which handles probation cases in Washington County. Director of Corrections Kristina Peters says the program gives back to other non-profits through the probation fees that are collected. This year’s recipients of the funding were CASA of Northeast Tennessee, Second Harvest of Northeast Tennessee, the Alzheimer's Association and the Dawn of Hope Foundation.


Taylor Honored by State Drug Court Association

The Tennessee Association of Drug Court Professionals honored 23rd Judicial District Assistant Public Defender Richard Taylor Jr. with the Christy Vernon Spirit Award at its annual conference in Murfreesboro. Circuit Judge Robert Burch, who also oversees the 23rd Judicial District Drug Court, presented the award. Taylor has served with the court since its creation and has implemented a number of innovative programs during his tenure. He also is active in the association, having served as president, vice president, secretary and board member. In addition, Taylor actively lobbies on behalf of federal funding for drug courts and serves as a resource for elected officials who want to learn more about drug court protocols. Read more in this release from the court.


McNally Seeks Re-election, Outlines Legislative Priorities

Oak Ridge Republican Randy McNally, first elected to the state Senate in 1986, says he has decided to seek re-election to another four-year term, believing “there are a number of things sort of left undone” including “reform of our state judiciary.” Humphrey on the Hill reports today that McNally says the system is “more for the protection of criminals and the enrichment of trial lawyers and not for protection of the public.” With respect to particular issues, McNally previously proposed drug testing of all judges. He now says he will revise his bill to allow either party in a case to request that the judge take a drug test before presiding. He also says he wants to push for new restrictions on state funding of criminal defense lawyers and hold attorneys financially responsible if a court later finds they provided inadequate counsel.


Harmon Announces Re-election Bid

Jeff Harmon has announced that he will seek re-election as the 12th Judicial District public defender in the August 2014 election. Harmon served as an assistant public defender for over 18 years before being appointed to the top job. The Herald News has the story.


Former Probate, Juvenile Judge Dies

Former probate and juvenile court judge R.D. Campbell of Butler died Dec. 19 at the age of 90. Campbell held several positions in Johnson County including justice of the peace, county court magistrate for 18 years, chairman and vice chairman of the county court, county executive, probate judge and juvenile judge. He also was a member of the Tennessee/Virginia Development Board and the Upper East Tennessee Human Development Agency. Funeral services were conducted this past weekend. Friends may call on Campbell’s daughter Maxine Carter, 1916 Glademill Dr., Kingsport, TN, 37663, or son Dean Campbell, 891 R.D. Campbell Rd., Butler, TN 37640. Online condolences may be shared at www.huxlipfordfh.com. The Elizabethton Star has more details.


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About this publication: Today's News is a compilation of digests of news reports of interest to Tennessee lawyers compiled by TBA staff, links to digested press releases, and occasional stories about the TBA and other activities written by the TBA staff or members. Statements or opinions herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Tennessee Bar Association, its officers, board or staff.


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