AG Appointment Bill Taken Off Notice in Subcommittee

Legislative efforts to remove the Supreme Court’s power to select the state Attorney General appear to be stalled. A bill calling for popular election of the post (SJR 123) was rejected by the full Senate on Feb. 5 and Wednesday the House Civil Justice Subcommittee took off notice SJR 196, which called for appointment of the AG by the General Assembly. Gavel to Gavel looks back at similar bills that have failed to change the selection process over the past 17 years.

Today's Opinions

Click on the category of your choice to view summaries of today’s opinions from that court, or other body. A link at the end of each case summary will let you download the full opinion in PDF format.

01 - TN Supreme Court
02 - TN Workers Comp Appeals
00 - TN Supreme Court - Rules
02 - TN Court of Appeals
12 - TN Court of Criminal Appeals
01 - TN Attorney General Opinions
00 - Judicial Ethics Opinions
00 - Formal Ethics Opinions - BPR
00 - TN Supreme Court - Disciplinary Orders









You can obtain full-text versions of the opinions two ways. We recommend that you download the Opinions to your computer and then open them from there. 1) Click the URL at end of each Opinion paragraph below. This should give you the option to download the original document. If not, you may need to right-click on the URL to get the option to save the file to your computer.


TN Supreme Court

STATE OF TENNESSEE v. DAVID DWAYNE BELL

Court: TN Supreme Court

Attorneys:

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; William E. Young, Solicitor General; Nicholas W. Spangler, Assistant Attorney General; and Leslie E. Price, Senior Counsel; James Bruce Dunn, District Attorney General; and Greg Eshbaugh, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellant, State of Tennessee.

Bryan E. Delius (at trial), and Bryce W. McKenzie, Sevierville, Tennessee (on appeal), for the appellee, David Dwayne Bell.

Judge: KOCH

This appeal involves the weight that should be given to a motorist’s performance on field sobriety tests in determining whether probable cause existed to arrest the motorist for driving under the influence of an intoxicant (“DUI”). A law enforcement officer stopped a motorist who was driving in the wrong direction on a divided highway in Sevier County. Another officer administered several field sobriety tests, and arrested the motorist for DUI because the motorist had been driving in the wrong direction on a divided highway, smelled of alcohol, and admitted that he had been drinking. When the grand jury returned a presentment charging the motorist with DUI and DUI per se, he filed a motion in the Circuit Court for Sevier County to suppress the evidence and to dismiss the charges. The trial court dismissed the charges on the ground that the officer lacked probable cause to arrest the motorist in light of his performance on the field sobriety tests. The Court of Criminal Appeals affirmed. State v. Bell, No. E2011-01241-CCA-R3-CD, 2012 WL 3776695 (Tenn. Crim. App. Aug. 31, 2012). We granted the State’s Tenn. R. App. P. 11 application for permission to appeal and now hold that the officer had probable cause to arrest the motorist for DUI without a warrant. Accordingly, we reverse the judgment of the Court of Criminal Appeals and the trial court, reinstate the charges, and remand to the trial court for further proceedings.


TN Workers Comp Appeals

ALVIN HAYES v. SHARP TRANSPORT CO. and CHEROKEE INSURANCE CO.

Court: TN Workers Comp Appeals

Attorneys:

Richard House, Franklin, Tennessee, for the appellee, Alvin Hayes.

Stephan K. Heard and Adam O. Knight, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellants, Sharp Transport Co. and Cherokee Insurance Co.

Judge: ANDERSON

In accordance with Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 51, this workers’ compensation appeal has been referred to the Special Workers’ Compensation Appeals Panel for a hearing and a report of findings of fact and conclusions of law. Employee suffered compensable injuries to his lower back and right shoulder. Employer asserted that the permanent disability award for employee’s injury should be capped at one and one half times his impairment rating because employee had voluntarily resigned. Following a bench trial the trial court found that the statutory cap of one and one half times did not apply to employee’s permanent partial disability benefits because employee’s retirement was reasonably related to his workplace injury and therefore he did not have a meaningful return to work. Based on an impairment rating of eleven percent the trial court awarded 35 percent permanent partial disability benefits. We find there was a meaningful return to work and accordingly we reverse the trial court judgment.


JOHNNIE HUDSON v. PRO LOGISTICS, CHEROKEE INSURANCE COMPANY, AND SUE ANN HEAD, ADMINISTRATOR OF THE SECOND INJURY FUND

Court: TN Workers Comp Appeals

Attorneys:

Stephen K. Heard and Adam O. Knight, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellants, Pro Logistics and Cherokee Insurance Company

Donald D. Zuccarello and Marshall H. McClarnon, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellee, Johnnie Hudson

Judge: ASH

Pursuant to Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 51, this workers’ compensation appeal has been referred to the Special Workers’ Compensation Appeals Panel for a hearing and a report of findings of fact and conclusions of law. The trial court found the employee suffered compensable injuries to his neck and back stemming from a motor vehicle accident and awarded him 54% permanent partial disability to the body as a whole. The employer has appealed, asserting the trial court’s award is excessive. Having carefully reviewed the record, we reverse the trial court’s judgment with respect to the impairment to the cervical spine and affirm in all other respects.


TN Court of Appeals

ACTION CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC, LLC v. PRENTICE DELON HYLER, ET AL.
CORRECTION: Page 1 - Benjamin J. Miller added to the attorneys for Erie Insurance Exchange and Prentice Delon Hyler removed from the attorney information listings.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

John P. Williams, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Action Chiropractic Clinic, LLC.

Gary A. Brewer and Benjamin J. Miller, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellee, Erie Insurance Exchange.

Judge: DINKINS

Chiropractic clinic which provided services to party injured in an automobile accident brought action against the injured party, who had assigned the proceeds of his claim against tortfeaser to the clinic in payment of the services, and the tortfeasor’s liability insurer, which did not honor the assignment. The trial court granted summary judgment to the insurer holding that: the victim did not have any rights relative to the insurance provider; the insurance policy required written consent for an assignment and there was no evidence of such consent; there was no privity between the clinic and the insurance provider; the clinic was not a beneficiary of the insurance policy; and the suit was a direct action against an insurance company which is prohibited by Tennessee law. The clinic appeals. Finding no error, we affirm the grant of summary judgment.


IN RE: JACOB C. H. and LILLIANNA J. H.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Joseph H. Crabtree, Jr., Athens, Tennessee, for the appellant, Wendy H.

Stephen S. Duggins, Chattanooga, Tennessee, and, Charles W. Pope, Athens, Tennessee, for the appellees, George H. and Hollie H.

Judge: SWINEY

George H. (“Father”) and Hollie H. (“Stepmother”) filed a petition seeking to terminate the parental rights of Wendy H. (“Mother”) to the minor children Jacob C. H. and Lillianna J. H. (“the Children”) and to allow Stepmother to adopt the Children. After a trial, the Trial Court entered its final order terminating Mother’s parental rights to the Children after finding and holding, inter alia, that clear and convincing evidence existed of grounds to terminate Mother’s parental rights to the Children pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-1-113(g)(1) and Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-1-102 for willful failure to visit and willful failure to support, and that clear and convincing evidence was proven that it was in the Children’s best interest for Mother’s parental rights to be terminated. Mother appeals the termination of her parental rights. We affirm the termination of Mother's parental rights to the Children.


TN Court of Criminal Appeals

STATE OF TENNESSEE v. CORY AUSTIN EDISON

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Jamie Machamer, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Cory Austin Edison.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Jeffrey D. Zentner, Assistant Attorney General; Victor S. Johnson, III, District Attorney General; and J.W. Hupp, Assistant District Attorney General; for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: THOMAS

The Defendant, Cory Austin Edison, challenges his jury conviction for aggravated robbery, a Class B felony, and his effective twenty-year sentence alleging prosecutorial misconduct in closing arguments; the admission of hearsay evidence without proper authentication at trial; and the improper imposition of consecutive sentencing. After reviewing the record and the relevant authorities, we conclude that the imposition of consecutive sentencing was not supported by the evidence and remand for a new sentencing hearing on that issue. The judgment of the trial court is, therefore, affirmed in part, reversed in part, and remanded.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. ASTIN D. HILL

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

George Morton Googe, District Public Defender; and Gregory D. Gookin, Assistant Public Defender, for the appellant, Astin D. Hill.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clark B. Thornton, Assistant Attorney General; James G. Woodall, District Attorney General; and Brian Gilliam, Assistant District Attorney General; for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: THOMAS

The Defendant, Astin D. Hill, contends that the trial court improperly (1) denied all forms of alternative sentencing in direct contravention of Tennessee Code Annotated section 40-35- 122, which prohibits continuous confinement for non-violent property offenses, and (2) imposed consecutive sentencing based on its erroneous finding that the Defendant had an extensive criminal history. After a review of the record and the applicable authorities, we conclude that the trial court’s failure to follow the dictates of section 40-35-122 was in error and affirm in part, reverse in part, and remand the case for resentencing.


HERSCHEL V. LILLARD, JR. v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Ryan C. Caldwell, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Herschel V. Lillard, Jr.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Caitlin E.D. Smith, Assistant Attorney General; Victor S. (Torry) Johnson, III, District Attorney General; and Dan Hamm, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: TIPTON

The Petitioner, Herschel V. Lillard, Jr., appeals the Davidson County Criminal Court’s denial of his petition for post-conviction relief from his 2010 conviction for first degree felony murder and resulting life sentence. The Petitioner contends that the trial court erred by denying him relief because he received the ineffective assistance of counsel. We affirm the judgment of the trial court.


GEORGE JONES v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Joseph T. Howell, Jackson, Tennessee, for the appellant, George Jones.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clarence E. Lutz, Senior Counsel; James G. Woodall, District Attorney General; and Shaun A. Brown, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: THOMAS

The Petitioner, George Jones, contends that he received the ineffective assistance of counsel at trial, effectively depriving him of his constitutional right to counsel. Specifically, the Petitioner claims that trial counsel failed to do the following: investigate the facts of and adequately prepare for his case; prepare him for his trial testimony; and advise him of the potential consequences of his decision to testify. After a thorough review of the record and the applicable authorities, we discern no error and affirm the judgment of the post-conviction court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. TIMOTHY WASHINGTON LYONS

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Michael A. Colavecchio, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Timothy Washington Lyons.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Sophia S. Lee, Senior Counsel; Victor S. Johnson, III, District Attorney General; and Hugh Ammerman, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: GLENN

The defendant, Timothy Washington Lyons, appeals his resentencing to consecutive terms of fourteen years and six years for his convictions for attempted second degree murder and reckless aggravated assault. On appeal, the defendant argues that the trial court failed to make appropriate findings in support of its sentencing determinations. Based upon our review, we affirm the judgments of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. WILLIAM AVERY MCKNIGHT

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

William J. Harold, Lewisburg, Tennessee, for the appellant, William Avery McKnight.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Lacy Wilber, Assistant Attorney General; Robert Carter, District Attorney General; and Weakley E. Barnard, Assistant District Attorney General for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WEDEMEYER

The Defendant, William Avery McKnight, pleaded guilty to aggravated burglary and theft of property over $1000, with the trial court to determine the length and manner of the sentences. The trial court ordered the Defendant to serve an effective sentence of eight years in the Tennessee Department of Correction. The Defendant appeals, asserting that the trial court erred when it denied his request for alternative sentencing. After a thorough review of the record and applicable law, we affirm the trial court’s judgments.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. JAMES PRINDLE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Michael E. Scholl (on appeal) and Claiborne Ferguson and Bridgett Stigger (at trial), Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellant, James Prindle.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; David H. Findley, Senior Counsel; Amy Weirich, District Attorney General; and Terre Fratesi and Jennifer Nichols, Assistant District Attorneys General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: BIVINS

A jury convicted James Prindle (“the Defendant”) of aggravated sexual battery, aggravated child abuse, aggravated child neglect, and filing a false offense report. After a sentencing hearing, the trial court ordered the Defendant to serve an effective term of twenty-two years’ incarceration. In this direct appeal, the Defendant contends that (1) the trial court erred in admitting certain evidence; (2) the trial court’s jury charge was erroneous; (3) the evidence was not sufficient to support his convictions; (4) the trial court should have remanded the case to juvenile court; and (5) his sentence is excessive. Upon our thorough review of the record and applicable law, we reverse the Defendant’s conviction of aggravated child neglect for lack of sufficient evidence. We affirm the remaining judgments of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. REUBEN JACOB SCHUTT

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Nathaniel Mills Colburn, Nashville, Tennessee, for the Appellant, Reuben Jacob Schutt.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clarence E. Lutz, Senior Counsel; Victor S. Johnson, III, District Attorney General; and Jeff P. Burks, Assistant District Attorney General, for the Appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WEDEMEYER

For three separate indictments, the Defendant, Reuben Jacob Schutt, pled guilty to two counts of theft of property valued over $1,000, one count of evading arrest by motor vehicle, and one count of theft of property valued over $500. As part of the plea agreement, the parties agreed that the sentences for each offense would run concurrently, with the trial court to determine the length of the sentences and whether the Defendant should be given a Community Corrections sentence. The trial court denied the Defendant’s request for an alternative sentence and sentenced him to an effective sentence of ten years, to be served at 45% as a Range III, persistent offender. On appeal, the Defendant contends that the trial court erred when it denied his request for an alternative sentence. After a thorough review of the record, the briefs, and relevant authorities, we conclude no error exists. Accordingly, we affirm the trial court’s judgments.


STATE OF TENNESSEE V. JEWELL WAYNE SMITH, JR.

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Gregory D. Smith (on appeal) and Chris Clark (at plea submission and sentencing), Clarksville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Jewell Wayne Smith, Jr.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Michelle L. Consiglio-Young, Assistant Attorney General; John W. Carney, District Attorney General; and Jason White, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: BIVINS

Jewell Wayne Smith, Jr. (“the Defendant”) entered a best interest plea to voluntary manslaughter. Following a sentencing hearing, the trial court sentenced the Defendant to thirteen years’ incarceration. The trial court ordered this sentence to run consecutively to a sentence the Defendant received for a probation violation. On appeal, the Defendant argues that the length of his sentence in this case is excessive. After a thorough review of the record and the applicable law, we affirm the judgment of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. SEYMORE S. STATEN

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Casey C. Truelove, Brentwood, Tennessee, for the appellant, Seymore S. Staten.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Meredith DeVault, Assistant Attorney General; Kim R. Helper, District Attorney General; and Mary Katharine White, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: TIPTON

The Defendant, Seymore S. Staten, was convicted by a Williamson County Circuit Court jury of reckless aggravated assault, a Class D felony. See T.C.A. § 39-13-102 (2010). He was sentenced as a Range I, standard offender to three years’ confinement to be served consecutively to a previously imposed eighty-seven-month federal sentence. On appeal, the Defendant contends that (1) the evidence is insufficient to support his conviction and (2) his right to a speedy trial was violated. We affirm the judgment of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. JOEY WALTON

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Stephen C. Bush, District Public Defender; Barry W. Kuhn (on appeal), Nigel Lewis and Michael J. Johnson (at trial), Assistant Public Defenders, for the appellant, Joey Walton.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; David H. Findley, Senior Counsel; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Abby Wallace and Jennifer Nichols, Assistant District Attorneys General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: GLENN

The defendant, Joey Walton, was convicted by a Shelby County Criminal Court jury of aggravated rape, a Class A felony; false imprisonment, a Class A misdemeanor; aggravated sexual battery, a Class B felony; and especially aggravated kidnapping, a Class A felony. The trial court merged the false imprisonment count into the aggravated rape count and sentenced the defendant as a violent offender to twenty-two years for the aggravated rape conviction, fifteen years for the especially aggravated kidnapping conviction, and twelve years for the aggravated sexual battery conviction. The court ordered that the aggravated rape and aggravated sexual battery sentences be served concurrently to each other but consecutively to the especially aggravated kidnapping sentence, for an effective sentence of thirty-seven years at 100% in the Department of Correction. The defendant raises three issues on appeal: (1) whether the trial court erred by denying his motion to suppress his statement to police; (2) whether the trial court properly admitted a police officer’s testimony about his conversation with the defendant; and (3) whether the evidence is sufficient to sustain his convictions. Following our review, we affirm the judgments of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. CURTIS WORD

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Donna Orr Hargrove, District Public Defender; and Andrew Jackson Dearing, Assistant Public Defender, for the appellant, Curtis Word.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Tracy L. Bradshaw, Assistant Attorney General; Robert Carter, District Attorney General; and Hollynn Eubanks, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: THOMAS

The Defendant, Curtis Word, challenges the trial court’s sentence of incarceration, alleging that nothing in the record overcame the presumption that he was a favorable candidate for alternative sentencing and requesting that this court place him on probation or community corrections. Upon consideration of the applicable authorities and the record, we affirm the judgment of the trial court.


TN Attorney General Opinions

State Regulation of Pole Attachment Rates of TVA-Supplied Electric Cooperatives

Court: TN Attorney General Opinions

Date: 2014-02-19

Opinion Number: 20


Candidates Stream into Election Commission Before Deadline

A handful of candidates beat the noon deadline today to file for the May 6 Shelby County primary. The Election Commission was working shortly after the deadline on the list of filed candidates that it regularly updates on its website. Commission chairman Robert Meyers said he hopes to have signatures on the filed petitions verified within 48 hours. Candidates have until Feb. 27 to withdraw from the primary. The Commercial Appeal has more.


Nashville Judicial Candidate Switches to GOP Ballot

Attorney Adam Dread will run on a Republican ballot for General Sessions judge instead of as a Democrat. The former at-large Metro councilman is part of a crowded field running for General Sessions Judge Division IX. He said yesterday that he had learned a Davidson County Democratic Executive Committee member questioned his credentials and was leading the challenge to remove him from the ballot. Dread told the Tennessean, “It has always been my belief that judicial races should be non-partisan, as you are running to be an ‘impartial’ judge.”


'Messiah' Magistrate May Run for Judge

Child support magistrate Lu Ann Ballew — who was fired for changing a child’s name from Messiah to Martin — has picked up a petition to run for sessions judge. Ballew’s decision to change the child’s name was overruled, and Circuit Judge Duane Sloan fired her from her appointed job. She has been cited by the Board of Judicial Conduct and faces a hearing next month. Ballew has picked up a petition to run for the post being vacated by the retirement of Sessions Judge Ben Strand, based in Dandridge. There are four other candidates in the race, the Metro Pulse reports.


Judicial Candidates Report Fundraising

A number of judicial campaign committees in Sumner County have filed fundraising reports to the Tennessee Registry of Election Finance. The Tennesseean provides some highlights from the reports, including how several candidates are faring in their efforts to replace Chancellor Tom Gray, who is not seeking re-election. Results are also available for candidates running for juvenile court judge and clerk and master.


Smyrna Judge Seeks Re-election

Keta J. Barnes formally announced her bid for re-election as the presiding judge of the Smyrna Municipal/General Sessions Court, the Daily News Journal reports. “I want to thank each of you for your faith and trust in me,” the judge said in her press release. “I ask for your continued support as I seek to retain the office of Smyrna town judge.”


Pinkston Running Unopposed for Hamilton County DA

Neal Pinkston, executive assistant in the district attorney's office, will be the next Hamilton County District Attorney since he was the only candidate to file for the seat being vacated by Bill Cox as the noon deadline passed today. Criminal Court Judges Rebecca Stern, Don Poole and Barry Steelman are also unopposed, as are City Judges Sherry Paty and Russell Bean and Chancellor Jeff Atherton. Circuit Court Judge Marie Williams, Neil Thomas and Jeff Hollingsworth also do not have opposition. Visit the Chattanoogan for a summary of campaign filings.


House Approves Wine in Grocery Stores Bill

The Tennessee Senate will likely go along with minor changes made to the wine in food stores bill passed today by House of Representatives, the Commercial Appeal reports. The bill allows towns, cities and counties with liquor stores or liquor by the drink to start holding public referendums this November to decide whether to permit local food stores to sell wine.


Hooker Leaves Judicial Race After Recusal from Judge

John Jay Hooker’s brief campaign for the Davidson County Circuit Court ended when Hamilton “Kip” Gayden – who Hooker filed to run against -- issued an order this morning saying he would recuse himself from any cases involving Hooker so that he wouldn’t run afoul of judicial ethics rules, the Tennessean reports. With Gayden off the case involving Hooker’s challenge of the Judicial Performance Evaluation Commission, the 83-year-old attorney withdrew his petition to enter the race.


Students To Do Voting Research

Cumberland University and the Wilson County Election Commission are working together to improve the voting experience in Wilson County. Students in Eric Landis' MBA class have teamed with the election commission on a project to gather data on how long it takes to vote a ballot. The Aug. 7 general election ballot will include 15 judicial offices and all Wilson County offices except property assessor. Along with the general election, there will be a federal and state primary for all state legislative offices, governor, U.S. House and U.S. Senate. “The August ballot will have a large number of races on it,” administrator of elections Phillip Warren told the Tennessean. “This research helps us be prepared and have adequate voting machines at the polls on Election Day.”


'Mockingbird' Author Settles Museum Lawsuit

“To Kill a Mockingbird” author Harper Lee has settled the federal lawsuit she filed against the Monroe County Heritage Museum in her south Alabama hometown over its sale of souvenirs featuring her name and the title of her book, the Commercial Appeal reports. The settlement notice came days after a judge refused to dismiss the lawsuit, filed last fall, which said the museum uses Lee's name and the title of her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel without compensating her.


Opinion: Mosque Suit Wastes Tax Dollars

In an editorial, the Daily News Journal criticizes the plaintiffs of the ongoing Murfreesboro mosque lawsuit for wasting county taxpayer’s dollars. Rutherford County already has spent more than $340,000 for its defense in a lawsuit that continues to challenge the right of the Islamic faithful to build a mosque on Veals Road, the newspaper writes. The county won a state appeal that overturned the decision of Chancellor Robert Corlew that the county did not provide adequate public notice about consideration of the development plans for the mosque. Plaintiffs are now taking their appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.


Roane County Lawyer Temporarily Suspended

Spence Roberts Bruner was temporarily suspended from the practice of law on Feb. 19 for failing to respond to the board regarding a complaint of misconduct. Download the BPR notice.


Show Your Professional Pride with the TBA Visa

TBA members can now show their professional pride and get rewarded for doing so. The Tennessee Bar Association Visa® Platinum Rewards Card is now available to all members. Apply now and earn points at hundreds of online retailers. Redeem your points for name-brand merchandise, event tickets, gift cards, travel rewards options and more. Apply now!


 
 

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About this publication: Today's News is a compilation of digests of news reports of interest to Tennessee lawyers compiled by TBA staff, links to digested press releases, and occasional stories about the TBA and other activities written by the TBA staff or members. Statements or opinions herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Tennessee Bar Association, its officers, board or staff.


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