TBA Members Honored for Service to Profession

Former TBA president George “Buck” Lewis was recognized by the Supreme Court for his service as Chair of the Access to Justice Commission during the TBA Annual Convention in Gatlinburg. Lewis was presented with a certificate of appreciation signed by the entire Court during the June 12 Bench Bar luncheon. At the YLD’s Annual Board Dinner also held during Convention, outgoing president David McDowell presented the President’s Award to Murfreesboro lawyer Aimee Luna for her exceptional efforts educating Tennessee lawyers and librarians about free legal resources through this year’s YLD public service project. Brad Carter of Franklin and Ashley Holliday of Jackson also received special recognition awards. Carter was recognized for six years of service to the YLD, most notably as chair of the Wills for Heroes Committee. Holliday was recognized for her support for the Diversity Leadership Institute.

Also at the convention, Nashville lawyer Lynne Ingram was presented with the Larry Dean Wilks Leadership Award by fellow members of the TBA’s 2014 Leadership Law class during the group’s graduation ceremonies in Gatlinburg. The award, named for former TBA President Larry D. Wilks, recognizes a Leadership Law class member with exceptional leadership qualities. Ingram, an Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Tennessee, is the third recipient of the award.

Today's Opinions

Click on the category of your choice to view summaries of today’s opinions from that court, or other body. A link at the end of each case summary will let you download the full opinion in PDF format.

00 - TN Supreme Court
01 - TN Workers Comp Appeals
00 - TN Supreme Court - Rules
05 - TN Court of Appeals
09 - TN Court of Criminal Appeals
00 - TN Attorney General Opinions
00 - Judicial Ethics Opinions
00 - Formal Ethics Opinions - BPR
00 - TN Supreme Court - Disciplinary Orders









You can obtain full-text versions of the opinions two ways. We recommend that you download the Opinions to your computer and then open them from there. 1) Click the URL at end of each Opinion paragraph below. This should give you the option to download the original document. If not, you may need to right-click on the URL to get the option to save the file to your computer.


TN Workers Comp Appeals

MARY WHEETLEY v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Workers Comp Appeals

Attorneys:

Mary Wheetley, for the appellant, pro se.

Robert Cooper, Attorney General; William E. Young, Solicitor General; and Mary M. Bers, Senior Counsel, for the appellee, the State of Tennessee.

Judge: KOCH

This appeal involves a claim for workers’ compensation benefits filed by a nurse employed at the Middle Tennessee Mental Health Institute. The nurse filed a claim with the Tennessee Claims Commission because she believed that she had contracted tuberculosis when her hand came into contact with a patient’s blood. The claims commissioner dismissed the nurse’s claim on the basis that she failed to produce expert medical evidence that she had tuberculosis, and the nurse sought judicial review under Tenn. Sup. Ct. R. 51. We affirm the judgment of the Claims Commission.


TN Court of Appeals

IN RE: ALEXIS C.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Gerald T. Eidson, Rogersville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Jessica C.

Dallas L. Blair, III, Greeneville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Jesse W.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; and Jordan Scott, Assistant Attorney General for the appellee, State of Tennessee Department of Children’s Services.

Judge: SWINEY

Jessica C. (“Mother”) and Jesse W. (“Father”) appeal the termination of their parental rights to the minor child Alexis C. (“the Child”). We find and hold that clear and convincing evidence was shown that grounds existed to terminate Mother’s and Father’s parental rights to the Child for abandonment by wanton disregard pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-1- 113(g)(1) and Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-1-102(1)(A)(iv), and for severe abuse pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-1-113(g)(4) and Tenn. Code Ann. § 37-1-102, and that clear and convincing evidence was shown that the termination was in the Child’s best interest. We, therefore, affirm the judgment of the Juvenile Court for Greene County (“the Juvenile Court”) terminating Mother’s and Father’s parental rights to the Child.


IN RE: DONNA E.W., ET AL.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Michael Wallace Coleman, Jr., Lawrenceburg, Tennessee, for the appellant, Mother.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter, Paul Jordan Scott, Assistant Attorney General and Mary Byrd Ferrara, Assistant Attorney General, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellee, Tennessee Department of Children’s Services.

Teresa Powers Martin, Guardian ad Litem.

Judge: FARMER

The trial court terminated Mother’s parental rights on the grounds of abandonment for failure to support, persistence of conditions, and failure to substantially comply with the permanency plans. On appeal, Mother asserts that the trial court erred in determining that termination of her parental rights was in the children’s best interest. We affirm.


IN RE: SAMUEL P. ET AL.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Andrea Ayers, Livingston, Tennessee, for the appellant, J.L.F.

Chasity Hancock, Livingston, Tennessee, for the appellant, R.L.P.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter, and Alexander S. Rieger, Assistant Attorney General, for the appellee, Tennessee Department of Children’s Services.

Judge: MCBRAYER

Appellants are the parents of three children who were initially placed in foster care due to evidence of drug use in the parents’ home. In the Juvenile Court, the Tennessee Department of Children’s Services (“DCS”) petitioned to declare the children dependent and neglected and for emergency temporary custody. Following entry of a protective custody order, DCS filed an amended petition to declare the children dependent and neglected based upon additional allegations of severe child abuse. The Juvenile Court found severe abuse and the children to be dependent and neglected. Parents appealed to the Circuit Court, and DCS filed a petition to terminate parental rights. Following a trial, during which neither parent testified or presented evidence, the Circuit Court terminated parental rights as to each of the children. Both parents appeal the Circuit Court’s judgment. We affirm.


KAREN ELIZABETH TOUCHTON v. PAUL JEROME TOUCHTON

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

James L. Collier and M. Robb Thompson, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Paul Jerome Touchton.

Eric J. Burch, Manchester, Tennessee, for the appellee, Karen Elizabeth Touchton (Fishman).

Judge: DINKINS

In this post-divorce proceeding, Mother filed a petition seeking a modification of Father’s parenting time, recovery of medical expenses incurred on behalf of the parties’ child, and an increase in child support. The trial court modified Father’s parenting time, ordered an upward deviation to Father’s support obligation, and awarded Wife judgment for one-half of the medical expenses and one-half of the attorney fees she incurred in prosecuting the petition; the court issued an order that the judgment for medical expenses, back child support, and attorney fees be enforced by wage assignment. Father appeals the upward deviation, the award for one-half of the child’s medical expenses, and the wage assignment; Mother appeals the award for one-half of her attorney fees. We modify the wage assignment order to exclude the amount of the judgment for attorney fees; in all other respects we affirm the judgment.


ROBIN D. WILSON, ET AL. v. JOSEPH M. WEESE, ET AL.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Steven B. Ward, Madisonville, Tennessee, for the appellants, Robin D. Wilson, Gerald W. Wilson, II, Shirley Viera, Juan Viera, Jr., and Carolyn F. Butler.

William Tyler Weiss, Madisonville, Tennessee, for the appellees, Joseph M. Weese, Dean J. Weese, and Lisa Shaw.

Judge: MCCLARTY

In this case, the plaintiffs alleged that their easement rights had been interfered with by the defendant property owners. The trial court determined, inter alia, that the defendants, subject to the provisions in the deed at issue, could exclude all others from their property. The plaintiffs appeal. We affirm the determination of the trial court.


TN Court of Criminal Appeals

STATE OF TENNESSEE v. JAN MICHELLE ELL

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

J. Liddell Kirk (on appeal), Knoxville, Tennessee, and Mack Garner, District Public Defender (at trial), for the appellant, Jan Michelle Ell.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clarence E. Lutz, Senior Counsel; Michael L. Flynn, District Attorney General; and Kenlyn Foster, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: TIPTON

The Defendant, Jan Michelle Ell, was convicted by a Blount County Circuit Court jury of especially aggravated robbery, a Class A felony, and conspiracy to commit especially aggravated robbery, a Class B felony. See T.C.A. §§ 39-13-403, 39-12-103 (2010). The trial court sentenced the Defendant as a Range I, standard offender to concurrent sentences of twenty-two years for the especially aggravated robbery conviction and twelve years for the conspiracy conviction. On appeal, the Defendant contends that the evidence is insufficient to support her convictions. We affirm the judgments of the trial court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. BRIAN DUNKLEY and WILLIAM MILLER

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Michael A. Colavecchio, Nashville, Tennessee for the appellant, William Miller.

Hershell D. Koger (on appeal), Pulaski, Tennessee, and Kara Everett (at trial), Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Brian Dunkley.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Brent C. Cherry, Senior Counsel; Victor S. Johnson, III, District Attorney General; Pamela Anderson and Rachel Sobrero, Assistant District Attorneys General for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WEDEMEYER

A Davidson County jury convicted Defendant Brian Dunkley of conspiracy to commit first degree murder. The jury convicted Defendant William Miller of one count of conspiracy to commit first degree murder, one count of attempted aggravated burglary, and one count of attempted first degree murder. The trial court sentenced both defendants to effective sentences of twenty-five years in the Tennessee Department of Correction. On appeal, Defendant Dunkley asserts that: (1) the trial court erred when it admitted text messages into evidence pursuant to Tennessee Rule of Evidence 404(b); (2) the trial erred when it denied his motion for new trial because the trial court failed to function as the thirteenth juror and because newly discovered evidence warranted a new trial; (3) there is insufficient evidence to support his conviction; and (4) the trial court improperly applied enhancement factors when it sentenced him. Defendant Miller asserts that: (1) there is insufficient evidence to support his convictions; (2) the trial court erred when it denied his motion for new trial because the trial court failed to function as the thirteenth juror; and (3) the trial court erred when it imposed consecutive sentences. After a thorough review of the record and applicable law, we affirm the trial court’s judgments.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. JOSHUA ALLEN FELTS

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Elaine Heard (at trial and on appeal) and Michael Freeman (at trial), Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Joshua Allen Felts.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Caitlin E.D. Smith, Assistant Attorney General; Victor S. Johnson, III, District Attorney General; and Leticia Alexander, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: OGLE

A Davidson County Criminal Court Jury convicted the appellant, Joshua Allen Felts, on count one of theft of property valued less than $500, a Class A misdemeanor; on count two of attempted theft of property valued more than $1,000 but less than $10,000, a Class E felony; on count three of attempted theft of property valued more than $500 but less than $1,000, a Class A misdemeanor; and on counts four and five of theft of property valued more than $1,000 but less than $10,000, a Class D felony. The trial court imposed a total effective sentence of twelve years in the Tennessee Department of Correction. On appeal, the appellant challenges the sufficiency of the evidence sustaining his convictions, the trial court’s denial of his motion to suppress, and the State’s failure to preserve the chain of custody of the stolen items. Upon review, we affirm the appellant’s conviction in count five. However, the State concedes, and we agree, that the State failed to establish the value of the stolen items in the remaining counts; therefore, we remand to the trial court for amendment of the judgments of conviction in counts one and four to theft of property valued less than $500, a Class A misdemeanor, and to reflect the reduction in the sentence on each of those convictions to eleven months and twenty-nine days. Additionally, we remand to the trial court for amendment of the judgments of conviction in counts two and three to attempted theft of property valued less than $500, a Class B misdemeanor, and to reflect the reduction in the sentence on each of those convictions to six months.


ALBERT WAYNE FRANCHEK, JR. v. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

William Michael Carter, Gallatin, Tennessee, for the appellant, Albert Wayne Franchek, Jr.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Brent C. Cherry, Senior Counsel; Lawrence Ray Whitley, District Attorney General; and Jason Elliott, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: OGLE

The Petitioner, Albert Wayne Franchek, Jr., appeals the Sumner County Criminal Court’s denial of his petition for post-conviction relief from his guilty plea to selling one-half gram or more of a Schedule II controlled substance, a Class B felony, and resulting eight-year sentence. On appeal, the Petitioner contends that he received the ineffective assistance of counsel and that he did not plead guilty knowingly and voluntarily. Based upon the record and the parties’ briefs, we affirm the judgment of the post-conviction court.


STATE OF TENNESSEE V. ELMUS TRAVIS GAYLOR

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Clarence E. Pridemore, Jr. (on appeal), and Steven E. Sams (at trial), Knoxville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Elmus Travis Gaylor.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Deshea Dulany Faughn, Assistant Attorney General; Lori Phillips-Jones, District Attorney General; and Michael O. Ripley and Scarlett W. Ellis, Assistant District Attorneys General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: BIVINS

Elmus Travis Gaylor (“the Defendant”) pleaded guilty to second degree murder and especially aggravated robbery. Following a sentencing hearing, the trial court ordered the Defendant to serve an effective sentence of twenty-five years. On appeal, the Defendant challenges the length of his sentence. After a thorough review of the record and the applicable law, we affirm the judgments of the trial court.


ANTONIO SANTIAL JONES V. STATE OF TENNESSEE

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Michael J. Flanagan, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Antonio Santial Jones.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Clark B. Thornton, Senior Counsel; Victor S. Johnson, III, District Attorney General; and Roger Moore, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WILLIAMS

The petitioner, Antonio Santial Jones, appeals the denial of his petition for post-conviction relief. The petitioner was convicted of second degree murder and is currently serving a sentence of twenty-two years in the Department of Correction. On appeal, he contends that trial counsel was ineffective for failing to supply the petitioner with discovery, only beginning preparation for trial the day before, failing to convey a plea offer to the petitioner, and ignoring the self-defense claim asserted by the petitioner. Following review of the record, we affirm the denial of post-conviction relief.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. JOHN WESTIN MASSEY

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Michael L. Acuff, Chattanooga, Tennessee (on appeal) and Jerry Summers, Chattanooga, Tennessee (at trial) for the appellant, John Westin Massey.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Renee W. Turner, Senior Counsel; William H. Cox, III, District Attorney General; and Kate Lavery, Assistant District Attorney General for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WEDEMEYER

Pursuant to a plea agreement, the Defendant, John Westin Massey, pled guilty to vehicular homicide and to driving while under the influence (“DUI”), which was merged with the vehicular homicide. The sentence was eight years with the trial court to determine the manner of service of his sentence. After a sentencing hearing, the trial court ordered the Defendant to serve his sentence in the Tennessee Department of Correction. The Defendant asserts that the sentence is excessive and that the trial court’s denial of an alternative sentence was improper based upon the facts of the case. After a thorough review of the record and applicable law, we affirm the trial court’s judgment.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. JENNIFER LEIGH SALYERS

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Andrew J. Gibbons, Blountville, Tennessee (on appeal) and Frank L. Slaughter, Jr., Bristol, Tennessee (at hearing) for the appellant, Jennifer Leigh Salyers.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Benjamin A. Ball, Senior Counsel; Barry Staubus, District Attorney General; and Julie Canter, Assistant District Attorney General for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: WEDEMEYER

The Defendant, Jennifer Leigh Salyers, pled guilty to two counts of reckless aggravated assault. The trial court denied the Defendant’s application for judicial diversion and sentenced her to serve sixty days in jail, followed by two years of supervised probation. The Defendant asserts that the trial court erred when it denied her application for judicial diversion and a sentence of full probation. After a thorough review of the record and applicable law, we affirm the trial court’s judgments.


STATE OF TENNESSEE v. LLOYD DANIEL THOMPSON

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Mark E. Stephens, District Public Defender; Emily A. Herbert (on appeal) and Kathryn Merwald (at hearing), Assistant Public Defenders, for the appellant, Lloyd Daniel Thompson.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Michael A. Meyer, Deputy Attorney General; Randall E. Nichols, District Attorney General; and Patricia Cristil, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: GLENN

The defendant, Lloyd Daniel Thompson, pled guilty in the Knox County Criminal Court to theft of property valued at $10,000 or more but less than $60,000, a Class C felony, and was sentenced by the trial court as a Range I, standard offender to three years in the Department of Correction, suspended to supervised probation. The trial court also ordered that the defendant pay $40,000 in restitution to the victim. In a timely appeal to this court, the defendant argues that the evidence at the restitution hearing did not support the trial court’s determination of the victim’s losses and that the trial court erred in ordering him to pay $40,000 in restitution without considering his resources and future ability to pay. Following our review, we affirm the trial court’s finding that the victim suffered $40,000 in losses but remand for the trial court to determine the defendant’s current financial resources and future ability to pay restitution.


Haslam Backs 'Cooling Off' Period in Domestic Abuse Cases

Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday he supports making a 12-hour “cooling off” period mandatory for people arrested on domestic violence charges, the Memphis Daily News reports. "I think that makes sense," Haslam said. "I'm far from an expert on that, but from what I understand, it just feels like that is a common sense law." The statement comes in the midst of a controversy over a case involving a Nashville judge who released a man from jail a few hours after his arrest on a domestic violence charge. Police say he assaulted his girlfriend a second time shortly after being released.


Republican Probe of Chief Justice Stalls

A Republican-led Senate investigation stalled Tuesday on whether Tennessee Supreme Court Chief Justice Gary Wade improperly interfered with an independent panel's evaluations of other judges, the Chattanooga Times Free Press reports. After an ad hoc panel discussion, officials concluded that no laws were broken and no judicial rules were violated when Wade found out, from a leak, about Performance Evaluation Commission members' initial negative evaluations of three Court of Appeals judges up for reelection in August. The officials also told the panel that Wade’s comments voicing concern about the negative evaluation publicity and defending the judges’ professional performance did not constitute an election endorsement.


Daniels: Retention Election Getting 'Smelly'

Tennessean columnist Frank Daniels III takes a critical look at the politics involved in yesterday's Senate ad hoc committee hearing led by Sen. Mike Bell, R-Riceville. The committee spent four hours analyzing who "leaked" information from the Judicial Performance Evaluation Commission (JPEC) to Chief Justice Gary Wade and whether Wade then violated ethics rules by making comments about the preliminary report. Near the end of the hearing, Sen. Jim Kyle, D-Memphis -- visibly frustrated with his fellow senators -- erupted with a sports metaphor, Daniels reports.  "With all due respect, you are just arguing the call," he barked. The board followed the rules, followed the process the legislature established, and made the decision that it could not discipline the chief justice for his actions, Kyle pointed out to the committee. "You think the ball was out-of-bounds, and they said it was in-bounds."


Opinion: Ramsey’s Judicial Purge Should be Rejected

Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey’s attempt to purge Tennessee Supreme Court Chief Justice Gary Wade, Justice Connie Clark and Justice Sharon Lee from the court is a direct assault on an independent judiciary and should be soundly rejected, an opinion piece in the Columbia Daily Herald states. Sam D. Kennedy — a former editor and publisher of the newspaper — writes  “We ask for good judges, those with courage who will not knuckle under to the demands of a governor, a state senator or a heavy campaign contributor; and one who will act in an impartial manner. ... His (Ramsey's) only reason for opposition to them is he wants to replace them with others who will follow his orders.”


Judge Seals Court Filings in Vandy Rape Case

The judge handling the case involving four former Vanderbilt University football players accused in the videotaped rape of an unconscious student sealed more than 100 pages of exhibits on Monday, the Tennessean reports. Criminal Court Judge Monte Watkins ordered the records to be sealed after a complaint from the victim that they contained photographs, identifying information and medical records. “The Court finds that the alleged victim has a right under the Tennessee Constitution to be free from intimidation, harassment and abuse throughout the criminal justice system," Watkins wrote in his order.


New Hope for Convicted Criminals Seeking Jobs

A new law in Tennessee is paving the way for jobs applicants with a criminal past to gain employment, WDEF News 12 reports. Next Tuesday, the Tennessee Negligent and Retention law takes effect allowing employers to hire an ex-offender who has received a "certificate of employability" after paying his or her dues to society. In return, employers would be protected from liability suits if the ex-offender with a violent past assaults a fellow co-worker. The new law guarantees that safety only to a certain point — if an ex-offender with a certificate of employability remains employed after showing new signs of danger or violence, the company is liable. 


Council Selects New Gallatin City Attorney

Susan R. High McAuley has been chosen to be the new Gallatin city attorney, the Tennessean reports. During a special-called meeting Tuesday, the Gallatin City Council and Mayor Jo Ann Graves unanimously voted for McAuley after interviewing eight candidates last week. McAuley, currently an attorney at Bone McAllester Norton’s Sumner County office in Hendersonville, will begin the new position June 30. She succeeds Joe Thompson, who was elected Sumner County Circuit Court judges in a close May 6 county primary race following the sudden death of Judge C.L. "Buck" Rogers in February.


Tennessee Chosen for Juvenile Justice Aid

Tennessee is one of four states chosen for a federal program to better help juveniles with behavioral disorders stay out of custody. Along with Georgia, Indiana and Massachusetts, Tennessee state officials are getting support from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the MacArthur Foundation to create better ways to screen for behavioral health disorders and care for juveniles in community settings. Although the state has been praised for reducing its jailing of teens in the past 15 years, the new program seeks to help youth long before they come into contact with the justice system. The Tennessean has more.


Justice Center Unveils Historical Documents

The Washington County Heritage Committee this week unveiled eight historical legal documents inside the George P. Jaynes Justice Center, roughly two years after getting the state legislative go-ahead to place them inside county buildings, the Johnson City Press reports. The Ten Commandments, the Magna Carta, Watauga Petition of 1776, Declaration of Independence, Constitution of the State of Franklin, Preamble of the United States Constitution, The Bill of Rights and other amendments, and the Tennessee Constitution of 1796 were among the initial documents chosen for display that are “historically significant documents related to the American and Tennessee Jurisprudence,” according to a resolution unanimously approved by the County Commission.


ABA Approves Partially Online Law Degree

The American Bar Association recently approved a new half online, half on-site law program at William Mitchell College of Law in St. Paul, Minneapolis. While the ABA allows law schools to offer up to 12 hours of online credit, the hybrid program is the first of its kind to receive accreditation. US News and World Reports has more.


TBA Members Now Save with UPS

As a TBA member you now can save up to 36 percent on UPS Next Day Air and up to 18 percent on UPS Ground Shipping! Visit UPS online to learn how this new member benefit can deliver greater efficiencies for your firm. Already a UPS customer? You also are eligible for this discount once you register your account on the UPS' TBA discount site.


 
 

Questions, comments: Email us at TBAToday@tnbar.org

About this publication: Today's News is a compilation of digests of news reports of interest to Tennessee lawyers compiled by TBA staff, links to digested press releases, and occasional stories about the TBA and other activities written by the TBA staff or members. Statements or opinions herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Tennessee Bar Association, its officers, board or staff.


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