Cast Your Vote Tomorrow

Election Day is tomorrow, Aug. 7, for state primary and general county elections as well as judicial retention elections for all appellate court judges. Polling locations will be open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. in Hamilton and Knox counties, and from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. in Davidson and Shelby counties. Contact your local election commission for information about voting locations and times. Follow election results from the Tennessee Secretary of State's office, which will be posting on its website as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Get information about following specific races here. The office warns that results may come out later than usual given the length of this year's ballot.

Today's Opinions

Click on the category of your choice to view summaries of today’s opinions from that court, or other body. A link at the end of each case summary will let you download the full opinion in PDF format.

00 - TN Supreme Court
00 - TN Workers Comp Appeals
00 - TN Supreme Court - Rules
11 - TN Court of Appeals
01 - TN Court of Criminal Appeals
00 - TN Attorney General Opinions
00 - Judicial Ethics Opinions
00 - Formal Ethics Opinions - BPR
00 - TN Supreme Court - Disciplinary Orders









You can obtain full-text versions of the opinions two ways. We recommend that you download the Opinions to your computer and then open them from there. 1) Click the URL at end of each Opinion paragraph below. This should give you the option to download the original document. If not, you may need to right-click on the URL to get the option to save the file to your computer.


TN Court of Appeals

IN RE AARON E.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Seth M. Lasater, Columbia, Tennessee, for the appellant, Angela E.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter, Alexander S. Rieger, Assistant Attorney General, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellee, Tennessee Department of Children’s Services.

Judge: MCBRAYER

Angela E. (“Mother”) appeals the termination of parental rights to her minor child, Aaron E. The Tennessee Department of Children’s Services (“DCS”) placed the child in protective custody based upon evidence of physical abuse. The abuse occurred while the child was in the care of Mother’s boyfriend. The Juvenile Court later made a finding that the child was dependent and neglected and granted temporary custody to DCS. DCS ultimately filed a petition to terminate Mother’s and the father’s parental rights. The Juvenile Court terminated the father’s parental rights at a separate hearing, and the matter proceeded to trial against Mother only. Following the trial, the Juvenile Court entered an order also terminating Mother’s parental rights, relying on the grounds of abandonment and persistence of conditions. We have determined that the record contains clear and convincing evidence to support terminating Mother’s parental rights on one of the two grounds relied upon by the Juvenile Court and to support the court’s conclusion that terminating Mother’s parental rights is in the child’s best interest.


AMERICAN CASUALTY COMPANY OF READING, PENNSYLVANIA v. STATE OF TENNESSEE
CORRECTION: Page One (1), Attorney Patricia Moskal's name has been removed from the attorney information listing.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Brad A. Lampley and Tricia Olson, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, American Casualty Company of Reading, Pennsylvania.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter, Joseph F. Whalen, Associate Solicitor General, and Jonathan N. Wike, Senior Counsel, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

John Brister Burns, Warren Davidson Broemel, and John Vinson Arnold, Nashville, Tennessee, as the Amicus Curiae.

Judge: CLEMENT

Five separate groups of Pennsylvania-domiciled insurance companies filed five separate tax refund claims in which each challenges the imposition of retaliatory insurance premium taxes by the Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. § 56-4-218. The central issue presented is whether Pennsylvania’s surcharges or assessments for three Workmen’s Compensation funds are imposed upon Tennessee-domiciled insurance companies doing business in Pennsylvania and, therefore, fall within Tennessee’s retaliatory insurance premium tax statute. The Tennessee Claims Commission ruled in favor of the state and all of the Pennsylvania insurance companies appealed. Finding no error, we affirm.


AMERICAN HOME ASSURANCE COMPANY, ET AL. v. STATE OF TENNESSEE
CORRECTION: The names of the four attorneys have been removed in the first listing and the formatting of the opinion adjusted as necessary.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Bradley A. Lampley and Tricia Thor Olson, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellants, American Home Assurance Company and Commerce & Industry Insurance Company.

Tracy D. Williams, William M. Sneed, Peter D. Edgerton, and Lisa E. Schwartz, pro hac vice, Chicago, Illinois, for the appellants, American Home Assurance Company and Commerce & Industry Insurance Company.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Joseph F. Whalen, Associate Solicitor General; and Jonathan N. Wike, Senior Counsel; for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

John Brister Burns and Warren Davidson Broemel, Nashville, Tennessee, as the Amicus Curiae.

Judge: BENNETT

Claimant insurance companies challenge the state’s calculation of the retaliatory tax. They filed claims for refunds in the claims commission. The commission ruled for the state. Claimants appealed, alleging that New York law required the charges at issue to be passed on to the policy holder, so the charges should not be included in the retaliatory tax calculation. We find that four of the charges should be included in the retaliatory tax calculation and two should not. Claimants also raise several constitutional challenges, all of which we reject.


CHARTIS CASUALTY COMPANY ET AL. v. STATE OF TENNESSEE
CORRECTION: Page One (1), Attorney Patricia Moskal's name has been removed from the attorney information listing.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Brad A. Lampley and Tricia Olson, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellants, Chartis Casualty Company, Granite State Insurance Company, Insurance Company of the State of Pennsylvania, and New Hampshire Insurance Company.

Tracy D. Williams, William M. Sneed, Peter D. Edgerton and Lisa E. Schwartz, pro hac vice, Chicago, Illinois, for the appellants, Chartis Casualty Company, Granite State Insurance Company, Insurance Company of the State of Pennsylvania, and New Hampshire Insurance Company.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter, Joseph F. Whalen, Associate Solicitor General, and Jonathan N. Wike, Senior Counsel, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

John Brister Burns, Warren Davidson Broemel, and John Vinson Arnold, Nashville, Tennessee, as the Amicus Curiae.

Judge: CLEMENT

Five separate groups of Pennsylvania-domiciled insurance companies filed five separate tax refund claims in which each challenges the imposition of retaliatory insurance premium taxes by the Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. § 56-4-218. The central issue presented is whether Pennsylvania’s surcharges or assessments for three Workmen’s Compensation funds are imposed upon Tennessee-domiciled insurance companies doing business in Pennsylvania and, therefore, fall within Tennessee’s retaliatory insurance premium tax statute. The Tennessee Claims Commission ruled in favor of the state and all of the Pennsylvania insurance companies appealed. Finding no error, we affirm.


CHUBB INDEMNITY INSURANCE COMPANY, ET AL. v. STATE OF TENNESSEE
CORRECTION: The pro hac vice attorneys listed on the opinion have been removed and the formatting of the opinion adjusted as necessary.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Patricia Head Moskal and Brett R. Carter, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellants, Chubb Indemnity Insurance Company and Vigilant Insurance Company.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Joseph F. Whalen, Associate Solicitor General; and Jonathan N. Wike, Senior Counsel; for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

John Brister Burns and Warren Davidson Broemel, Nashville, Tennessee, as the Amicus Curiae.

Judge: BENNETT

Claimant insurance companies challenge the state’s calculation of the retaliatory tax. They filed claims for refunds in the claims commission. The commission ruled for the state. Claimants appealed, alleging that New York law required the charges at issue to be passed on to the policy holder, so the charges should not be included in the retaliatory tax calculation. We find that four of the charges should be included in the retaliatory tax calculation and two should not. Claimants also raise several constitutional challenges, all of which we reject. In addition, we affirm the commission’s decision not to allow Chubb’s proposed amendment as to the 2009 tax year payment.


GREAT AMERICAN INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK v. STATE OF TENNESSEE
CORRECTION: The pro hac vice attorneys listed on the opinion have been removed and the formatting of the opinion adjusted as necessary.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Patricia Head Moskal and Brett R. Carter, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Great American Insurance Company of New York.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Joseph F. Whalen, Associate Solicitor General; and Jonathan N. Wike, Senior Counsel; for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

John Brister Burns and Warren Davidson Broemel, Nashville, Tennessee, as the Amicus Curiae.

Judge: BENNETT

Claimant insurance company challenges the state’s calculation of the retaliatory tax. It filed claims for refunds in the claims commission. The commission ruled for the state. Claimant appealed, alleging that New York law required the charges at issue to be passed on to the policy holder, so the charges should not be included in the retaliatory tax calculation. We find that four of the charges should be included in the retaliatory tax calculation and two should not. Claimant also raises several constitutional challenges, all of which we reject.


IN RE JACKSON G. ET AL.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Douglas Thompson Bates, IV, Centerville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Allen G.

Melanie Totty Cagle, Centerville, Tennessee, for the appellees, Daniel E. and Mary E.

Judge: CLEMENT

The father of two minor children appeals the trial court’s decision to terminate his parental rights. The trial court terminated the father’s parental rights upon finding two grounds of abandonment, failure to visit and failure to support, and finding that terminating the father’s parental rights would be in the children’s best interests. We affirm.


NORTHERN INSURANCE COMPANY OF NY, ET AL. v. STATE OF TENNESSEE
CORRECTION: The names of the four attorneys have been removed in the first listing and the formatting of the opinion adjusted as necessary.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Bradley A. Lampley and Tricia Thor Olson, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellants, Northern Insurance Company of NY and Assurance Company of America.

Tracy D. Williams, William M. Sneed, Peter D. Edgerton, and Lisa E. Schwartz, pro hac vice, Chicago, Illinois, for the appellants, Northern Insurance Company of NY and Assurance Company of America.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Joseph F. Whalen, Associate Solicitor General; and Jonathan N. Wike, Senior Counsel; for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

John Brister Burns and Warren Davidson Broemel, Nashville, Tennessee, as the Amicus Curiae.

Judge: BENNETT

Claimant insurance companies challenge the state’s calculation of the retaliatory tax. They filed claims for refunds in the claims commission. The commission ruled for the state. Claimants appealed, alleging that New York law required the charges at issue to be passed on to the policy holder, so the charges should not be included in the retaliatory tax calculation. We find that four of the charges should be included in the retaliatory tax calculation and two should not. Claimants also raise several constitutional challenges, all of which we reject.


TENNISON BROTHERS, INC. V. WILLIAM H. THOMAS, JR.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Kathy Baker Tennison and Stuart B. Breakstone, Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellant, Tennison Brothers, Inc.

Gary E. Veazey, Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellee, William Thomas, Jr.

Robert L. J. Spence, Jr., Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellee, Clear Channel Outdoor, Inc.

Judge: STAFFORD

After a default judgment was entered against Appellee and in favor of Appellants on claims of intentional interference with business relationships, common law and statutory inducement to breach a contract and intentional interference with a contract, and breach of contract, a writ of inquiry hearing was held to determine the appropriate amount of damages to which the Appellants were entitled. Therein, the trial court went outside the pleadings to consider the issue of liability. We conclude that the trial court erred in considering the issue of liability because the well-pled facts contained in the Appellants’ respective complaints were dispositive on that question upon the grant of default judgment. Our review of the complaints leads us to conclude that the Appellants have set forth sufficient facts to prove the prima facie elements of their causes of action. Accordingly, Appellants are entitled to damages, and the trial court erred in denying them. Therefore, we reverse the trial court’s order, and remand for a determination of damages. Reversed and remanded.


VALLEY FORGE INSURANCE COMPANY v. STATE OF TENNESSEE
CORRECTION: Page One (1), Attorney Patricia Moskal's name has been removed from the attorney information listing.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Brad A. Lampley and Tricia Olson, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellant, Valley Forge Insurance Company.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter, Joseph F. Whalen, Associate Solicitor General, and Jonathan N. Wike, Senior Counsel, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

John Brister Burns, Warren Davidson Broemel, and John Vinson Arnold, Nashville, Tennessee, as the Amicus Curiae.

Judge: CLEMENT

Five separate groups of Pennsylvania-domiciled insurance companies filed five separate tax refund claims in which each challenges the imposition of retaliatory insurance premium taxes by the Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. § 56-4-218. The central issue presented is whether Pennsylvania’s surcharges or assessments for three Workmen’s Compensation funds are imposed upon Tennessee-domiciled insurance companies doing business in Pennsylvania and, therefore, fall within Tennessee’s retaliatory insurance premium tax statute. The Tennessee Claims Commission ruled in favor of the state and all of the Pennsylvania insurance companies appealed. Finding no error, we affirm.


ZURICH AMERICAN INSURANCE COMPANY, ET AL. v. STATE OF TENNESSEE
CORRECTION: The names of the four attorneys have been removed in the first listing and the formatting of the opinion adjusted as necessary.

Court: TN Court of Appeals

Attorneys:

Bradley A. Lampley and Tricia Thor Olson, Nashville, Tennessee, for the appellants, Zurich American Insurance Company and American Guarantee & Liability Insurance Company.

Tracy D. Williams, William M. Sneed, Peter D. Edgerton, and Lisa E. Schwartz, pro hac vice, Chicago, Illinois, for the appellants, Zurich American Insurance Company and American Guarantee & Liability Insurance Company.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Joseph F. Whalen, Associate Solicitor General; and Jonathan N. Wike, Senior Counsel; for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

John Brister Burns and Warren Davidson Broemel, Nashville, Tennessee, as the Amicus Curiae.

Judge: BENNETT

Claimant insurance companies challenge the state’s calculation of the retaliatory tax. They filed claims for refunds in the claims commission. The commission ruled for the state. Claimants appealed, alleging that New York law required the charges at issue to be passed on to the policy holder, so the charges should not be included in the retaliatory tax calculation. We find that four of the charges should be included in the retaliatory tax calculation and two should not. Claimants also raise several constitutional challenges, all of which we reject.


TN Court of Criminal Appeals

STATE OF TENNESSEE v. JUNE LOUDERMILK

Court: TN Court of Criminal Appeals

Attorneys:

Walter Bailey and Taurus Bailey (at trial and on appeal), and Claiborne H. Ferguson (on appeal), Memphis, Tennessee, for the appellant, June Loudermilk.

Robert E. Cooper, Jr., Attorney General and Reporter; Caitlin Smith, Assistant Attorney General; Amy P. Weirich, District Attorney General; and Michael McCusker, Assistant District Attorney General, for the appellee, State of Tennessee.

Judge: BIVINS

June Loudermilk (“the Defendant”) was convicted by a jury of driving under the influence (“DUI”), fourth offense. After a hearing, the trial court sentenced the Defendant to two years in the workhouse, suspended to supervised probation after seven months in confinement. In this direct appeal, the Defendant attacks the validity of his indictment and also contends that the trial court’s jury charge was so defective as to entitle him to a reversal of the jury’s determination that he was a multiple DUI offender. Upon our thorough review of the record and applicable law, we modify the trial court’s judgment of conviction and remand this matter for resentencing.


New CLE Website Offers New Tools, Powers, Formats

The TBA has launched a refreshed website for CLE programming that gives members new tools, new powers and new formats for learning. The new platform provides a seamless interface with the TBA.org website so you can more easily manage your courses and CLE compliance. In addition, a more sophisticated search engine will help you find the courses you want in less time and with less hassle, and new formats for interactive and online game CLE programs will offer more learning options. Explore it now.


Justices Make Case for Retention with Stops in Nashville, Blountville

Tennessee's three Supreme Court justices facing retention elections continued to fight back against a campaign to oust them with just two days left before election day. Justices Connie Clark and Sharon Lee took to Nashville's Public Square yesterday to lambaste attacks orchestrated from within the state and from out-of-state, the Tennessean reports. The pair were joined by former U.S. Attorney Ed Yarbrough and former Tennessee Supreme Court Justice William Koch, both Republicans who said they support retaining the three justices. Chief Justice Gary Wade made a stop at the Sullivan County Courthouse where retired U.S. Rep. Bill Jenkins, a Republican from Rogersville, defended Wade against claims that he is liberal and anti-business, the Times News reports.

As campaigning wraps up tomorrow, Justice Wade will spend election night with friends and family in East Tennessee, while Justices Clark and Lee will be at Jed's Sports Bar and Grille in Nashville, 114 28th Ave. South, for an informal gathering with friends and supporters.


Haslam Travels State Calling on Residents to Vote

Gov. Bill Haslam, who is facing nominal competition in the Republican primary tomorrow, said he is traveling the entire state of Tennessee “to remind people of the importance of voting.” Having been mayor of Knoxville and seeking a second term as governor, Haslam said he understands how important it is to get out the vote. The Post has more on his stop in Murfreesboro yesterday.


Williamson Bar Releases Retention Poll Results

The Williamson County Bar Association (WCBA) recently conducted a retention election poll for the justices and judges of the state Supreme Court, Court of Appeals and Criminal Court of Appeals. Association members voted to recommend retention for all. With regard to the Supreme Court justices, 97 percent of WCBA members recommended retention for Justice Connie Clark; 86 percent recommended retention for Justice Sharon Lee; and 89 percent recommended retention for Chief Justice Gary Wade. In releasing the poll results, WCBA President Neil Campbell stated, “The data gathered from the polling speaks for itself and shows that the Williamson County Bar Association clearly recognizes the importance of a fair and impartial judiciary and court system.”


Prosecutors Appear at Knoxville News Conference for Justices

Several prosecutors spoke in support of Tennessee Supreme Court Chief Justice Gary Wade and Justices Cornelia Clark and Sharon Lee at a news conference yesterday at the Tennessee Supreme Court building in Knoxville. The speakers argued that the justices are honorable, follow the law and deserve to be retained in Thursday's election. A half-dozen Knoxville lawyers joined the justices as did Eddie Biggs, chief deputy of the Knox County Sheriff's Office. Wade said the justices have the support of sheriffs and police departments across the state. Knoxnews has more.


Sullivan County Judges Urge Voters to be Informed

In a letter to the editor published today in the Kingsport Times News, six Sullivan County judges encourage citizens to do proper research before voting on Aug. 7. “We do not write this letter to recommend retaining, replacing or voting for any public official,” they state. “However, we feel we are obligated to warn the public that we are concerned and dismayed by the attitude displayed by many politicians, both nationally and locally, that think they are entitled to provide false information to the public.” The judges warn voters against being misled by labels, catchy slogans and unrealistic promises.


Why Some Business Owners Want New Justices

Among the legal community there is concern that the campaign to remove three of Tennessee's Supreme Court justices poses a threat to the independence of the judiciary and the predictability businesses expect from the high court, but some in the business community argue the opposite, suggesting that appointees from a Republican governor would create greater certainty, the Nashville Business Journal reports. “For business owners, predictability of legislation that’s been passed is critical. Tort reform is a prime example,” said Bill Lee, CEO of Franklin-based Lee Company, a provider of heating, air-conditioning and other facility services. “It’s business-friendly and Tennessee-citizen friendly legislation. The only danger to that continuity is the [state] Supreme Court overturning it, which may well happen with the existing judges in place.”


Republicans Duke it Out in Legislative Races

A fierce ideological civil war is playing out in some Tennessee Republican state legislative primary contests as tea party-style Republicans and traditional conservatives battle ahead of Thursday’s election, according to the Chattanooga Times Free Press (subscription required). Money for independent expenditures poured in by super PACs on both sides has reached more than $300,000, the paper reports.


Same Sex Marriage Appeal Arguments Heard Today

Plaintiffs and attorneys in the Tennessee same-sex marriage appeal this afternoon said they were hopeful following three hours of arguments in six cases across all four states of the 6th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals. “I thought everyone was very prepared and the court was very engaged, and it was a very intellectual exchange,” said Nashville lawyer Bill Harbison, who argued on behalf of three Tennessee couples seeking recognition of their marriages in the state. The three-judge panel, which included Tennessee Judge Martha Craig Daughtry, peppered attorneys from both sides with questions over the value of the judicial process versus the legislative process and states’ rights versus the rights of individual plaintiffs. Other Tennessee attorneys appearing for the plaintiffs were Abby R. Rubenfeld of Nashville; Scott Hickman, Phil Cramer and John Farringer with Sherrard & Roe in Nashville; Maureen T. Holland of Memphis; and Regina Lambert of Knoxville. Knoxnews has more.


Chattanooga Attorney Rumored to be Federal Judge Nominee

Travis McDonough, chief of staff for Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke, has been selected for nomination to fill the federal judge vacancy in Hamilton County when U.S. District Judge Curtis Collier steps down in October, sources say. The Chattanooga Times Free Press reports that multiple sources with knowledge of the process have confirmed that McDonough, a former attorney for Miller & Martin, has been notified that he will be President Barack Obama's nominee to the U.S. Senate to fill the upcoming vacancy.


Angry Bar Candidates Sue Over Exam Software Problems

Less than a week after a software glitch sent bar-examination takers scrambling to upload their answers, disgruntled law graduates have filed two class actions against the company that provided the testing software, the National Law Journal reports. Bar examiners use ExamSoft’s software to manage delivery of their tests to candidates who use computers. Test takers pay between $100 and $150 to download the software, which allows them to upload the written portions of their tests for grading, according to the complaints. On July 29, many encountered a glitch that held up their answers for many hours. A number of jurisdictions extended their submission deadlines, but some test takers were left frustrated and rattled. The suits seek compensation for the emotional distress test takers suffered as they waited to find out whether their exam answers had uploaded properly. Download the story.


LAS Provided $17M in Legal Aid Last Year

Year-end results for 2013 reveal that the Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands and its team of volunteer pro bono attorneys provided more than $17.4 million in free legal help throughout 48 counties. Throughout the year, Legal Aid handled a total of 7,709 cases for low-income individuals and families and received more than 18,000 requests for assistance. Cases covered a variety of legal issues, with family law being the most common. “These numbers not only reflect Legal Aid Society’s dedication to work toward fairness for all people in the civil justice system, they also speak to the continual need for our services,” Executive Director Gary Housepian said in a press release.


Many ‘Dreamers’ Not Signing up for Deportation Relief

Only 55 percent of the 1.2 million immigrants who were eligible for relief from deportation under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in 2012 have applied, according to a new Migration Policy Institute report. Under DACA, unauthorized immigrants who entered the United States before the age of 16 and were under the age of 31 in 2012 can win the right to work in the country if they can meet certain residency and education requirements. The Memphis Business Journal has more.


Roberts to Launch Magna Carta Celebration at Annual Meeting

U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts will launch the ABA's yearlong, 800th anniversary commemoration of the Magna Carta during the ABA Annual Meeting in Boston this week. In his address to the House of Delegates, Roberts will talk about the historical and current significance of the document sealed by King John of England in 1215 in response to demands by landowning barons. A traveling exhibit curated by the Library of Congress, “Magna Carta: Enduring Legacy 1215-2015,” will be unveiled at the meeting and then move to cities around the country. Its travel will culminate with the ABA's London Sessions next June in England. The ABA Journal has more.


Hamilton County Lawyer Reinstated

The Tennessee Supreme Court reinstated the law license of Hamilton County lawyer John Alley on Aug. 4. Alley had been placed on disability inactive status on June 19. He petitioned the court to reinstate his license on July 17. Download the BPR notice.


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About this publication: Today's News is a compilation of digests of news reports of interest to Tennessee lawyers compiled by TBA staff, links to digested press releases, and occasional stories about the TBA and other activities written by the TBA staff or members. Statements or opinions herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Tennessee Bar Association, its officers, board or staff.


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