News

Thanks to Our Sponsor

 

Wood is a global leader in the delivery of project, engineering and technical services to energy and industrial markets operating in more than 60 countries. Wood provides performance-driven solutions throughout the asset lifecycle, from concept to decommissioning across a broad range of industrial markets, including upstream, midstream and downstream oil & gas, chemicals, environment and infrastructure, power & process, clean energy, mining, nuclear and general industrial sectors. 

read more »

Thanks to Our Section Leaders

Thanks to the members of the 2017 - 2018 TBA Environmental Law Section Executive Council for their service to the section this year. In addition to the production of CLE programming for the members, the executive council meets regularly throughout the year to produce news to the members and the Jon E. Hastings Memorial Award Writing Competition. Thanks to all for their dedication and hard work on behalf of the TBA Environmental Law Section.
 
OFFICERS
 
• Lauran Sturm, Chair
Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation (Nashville)
 
• Jenny Howard, Vice-Chair
Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation (Nashville)
 
• Willa Kalaidjian, Immediate Past Chair
Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel PC (Chattanooga)
 
• Robert "Jaz" Boon, Newsletter Editor
Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis LLP (Nashville)
 
• Bob Tuke, Secretary/Treasurer
Trauger & Tuke (Nashville)
 
 
MIDDLE TENNESSEE DELEGATES
 
• Elizabeth Alexander
Southern Environmental Law Center (Nashville)
 
• Gregory T. Young
Stites & Harbison PLLC (Nashville)
 
• Scott Thomas
Bass, Berry & Sims PLC (Nashville)
 
 
WEST TENNESSEE DELEGATES
 
• Jim Lenschau
Wyatt Tarrant & Combs (Memphis)
 
• Randy Womack
Glankler Brown PLLC (Memphis)
 
• Robert McLean
Farris Bobango Branan PLC (Memphis)
 
 
EAST TENNESSEE DELEGATES
 
• Ashley Lowe
Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz PC (Knoxville)
 
• David Higney
Grant, Konvalinka & Harrison PC (Chattanooga)
 
• Rick Hitchcock
Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel PC (Chattanooga)
 
read more »

Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Justice Write-ups

1.       EPA Year in Review for 2017-2018
a. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt released a report of its accomplishments under the Trump Administration’s first year in power.  The report touts, among other things, 22 deregulatory actions taken by the EPA, the removal of seven sites from the National Priority List, and action on 322 State Implementation Plans.
 
2.       October 31, 2017 Directive from Scott Pruitt, EPA Administrator
a. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt established certain principles and procedures for the Agency to follow when establishing the membership of EPA federal advisory committees.  The principles include strengthening member independence, increasing state, tribal and local government participation, enhancing geographic diversity, and promoting fresh perspectives.  Mr. Pruitt’s stated intent is to improve the internal management of the EPA although maintaining the discretion to depart from the new procedures.
 
3.        Directive Promoting Transparency and Public Participation and Consent Decrees and Settlement Agreements
 
read more »

Jon E. Hastings Memorial Award Writing Competition

The Environmental Law Section of the Tennessee Bar Association is sponsoring an Annual Writing Competition, titled the Jon E. Hastings Memorial Award, in memory of one of its outstanding founding members.  
 
$1,200 CASH PRIZE POOL
 
ENTRIES DUE APRIL 1, 2018
 
This is a juried award selection for the best legal writing on a topic of Tennessee or federal environmental law.
 
WHO IS ELIGIBLE?
Law Students enrolled in a Tennessee law school in 2017 or 2018.
 
WHAT?
Law students who comply with these criteria may submit an entry in accordance with the Rules of Competition. The Rules of Competition are available from Environmental Law professors or may be obtained by sending an email to Jarod Word at the Tennessee Bar Association, jword@tnbar.org.
 
WHY?
One of the primary purposes of the Environmental Law Section of the Tennessee Bar Association is to improve environmental compliance in Tennessee. We accomplish this goal through a number of means, including assisting our members to stay current on issues and promoting a dialogue on substantive environmental law topics.  
 
The Jon E. Hastings Memorial Award Writing Competition has several goals including the following:
 
A. To improve the understanding of environmental law in Tennessee through the publication of scholarly articles on pertinent and timely environmental law topics;
 
B. To strengthen the relationship among environmental law professors, environmental law students and environmental practitioners in Tennessee;
 
C. To recognize Jon E. Hastings, a founding member of the Tennessee Environmental Law Section, for his contributions to the body of environmental law in the State of Tennessee.  
 
To accomplish these goals, the Environmental Law Section is pleased to extend an opportunity to law students to participate in a writing competition.  The winning entry or entries will be published in the Newsletter of the Environmental Law Section.
 
This competition will be judged by a panel of environmental law practitioners, members of the judiciary, and/or professors selected by the Environmental Law Section of the Tennessee Bar Association.
 
The Award Winning paper(s) must be released from copyright or other restrictions for the purpose of publication in the Newsletter.
 
BACKGROUND
Jon E. Hastings was a founding member of the Environmental Law Section of the Tennessee Bar Association, and an attorney with Boult, Cummings, Conners & Berry PLC, who passed away at the young age of 45 on Aug. 22, 2004 after a two-year battle with cancer.  Jon was a proud member of the Environmental Law Section and an outstanding lawyer in the fields of environmental, telecommunications, and public utility law.  Jon was listed in the 2003 - 2004 edition of "The Best Lawyers in America" and found the energy to devote time on behalf of numerous philanthropic causes and civic groups.  
 
read more »

Part 2 of 2: Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs):

Emerging Contaminant Litigation Despite Federally Promulgated Rule

By Shalene Thomas and Brad Glisson
 
Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs) are a widely used class of synthetic chemicals of emerging concern to human health and the environment. These chemicals repel oil and water from clothing, carpet, furniture  and cookware and are used to suppress fires. PFASs have been ubiquitously used in aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) to extinguish hydrocarbon-based fires and in manufacturing processes related to photolithography, photographic coatings applications, electroplating mist suppressants and aviation hydraulic fluids. Although chemicals in the emerging class have been used ubiquitously in commerce since the 1960s, and health effects were first uncovered in the 1970s, there continues to be no Federally promulgated drinking water and clean-up rules around this class of chemicals. Despite this, more than a dozen cases have ensued involving PFASs and specifically Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and most recently GenX.
 
Initial litigation focus was on the manufacturers themselves, primarily DuPont (and spin-off Chemours) and 3M and primarily on PFOS and/or PFOA. For example, the first class-action lawsuit for PFASs was filed in 2004 (Leach, et al v. E. I. DuPont deNemours and Co.) on behalf of West Virginia residents across six different water districts exposed to PFOA releases from DuPont's Washington Works plant in Parkersburg, WV. A settlement was reached with DuPont in the original (Leach v. E. I. DuPont) class action lawsuit. The entire settlement was approved in February 2005 with $70 million for a health and education project, the installation of state-of-the-art water treatment technology for the six identified water districts and private well, $30 million to fund a PFOA health study, and funds available (up to $235 million) for the medical monitoring of class members. In the last few years, DuPont and Chemours have agreed to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to settle lawsuits related to PFOA, including a $670.7 million global settlement last February to settle 3,550 lawsuits in multidistrict litigation centered in Ohio.
 
Issues at the Washington Works plant appear to be continuing despite the nearly two decades of litigation. Earlier this month, Ohio's attorney general sued DuPont and its spin-off Chemours Co. for restitution and damages resulting from PFOA at the Washington Works plant in Parkersburg, WV. The Attorney General is seeking relief including 1) A declaration of DuPont’s duty to compensate Ohio for expenses related to the contamination, 2) Damages for injury to Ohio’s natural resources, including the economic impact to the state and its residents, 3) An award of present and future costs to clean up PFOA contamination, and 4) Restitution damages for profits DuPont obtained through the conduct.
 
In more recent years, the umbrella of litigation has grown past the manufacturer to include water utilities, product users, and secondary manufacturing applications. For example, in 2017, Tennessee Riverkeeper filed a lawsuit under the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, against 3M, BFI Waste Systems of Alabama, the city of Decatur, Morgan County and other entities to clean up landfills and wastewater treatment plants that Tennessee Riverkeeper states are still releasing PFOS and PFOA into the Tennessee River and local groundwater. In another example, a class-action lawsuit was filed against Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics and Honeywell International Inc. on behalf of residents in Hoosick Falls, N.Y., after discovering they were drinking water containing high levels of PFOA. Similar cases were filed in New Hampshire and Vermont against Saint-Gobain. The plant does not manufacture PFOA but rather applies it to fabric to make coated fabrics for application in sporting complexes, hazmat suits for the first responder, and shelters for mobile medical units. In a final example, a class action lawsuit was filed last October against five manufacturers of aqueous firefighting foams ("AFFF") containing PFOS and PFOA for the contamination of the groundwater relied upon by the residents of Yaphank, New York. The class action complaint was filed in the Supreme Court for the State of New York, Suffolk County, and names 3M, and several foam manufacturers (Tyco Fire Products L.P., Buckeye Fire Protection Co., National Foam, Chemguard) as Defendants. As cases continue to develop around AFFF, some have taken a proactive approach to address potential environmental and human health risks. The US Air Force as an example has already spent $210 million dollars on PFOS/PFOA actions to date to respond to AFFF-contaminated drinking water at 19 installations across the country. A total of 203 installations have been evaluated and 190 of them are expected to require further site inspections. 
 
The latest trend in PFAS litigation is currently towards other chemicals in the emerging contaminant class. For example, late last month, lawyers filed a new class action lawsuit against DuPont and Chemours claiming that the two firms contaminated the Cape Fear River in North Carolina with PFASs. The filing consolidates three class action suits filed since October 2017 by lawyers representing thousands of people who claim they are ill or could get ill because they drank water from the Cape Fear River and from wells surrounding the plant, now run by DuPont spin-off Chemours. The suit seeks funding for an epidemiological study to gauge the impact of PFOA, other polyfluoroalkyl substances, and GenX—which Chemours considers a safer alternative to PFOA — on residents along the Cape Fear River. It also seeks undetermined compensatory and punitive damages for illness, reduced property value, and the cost of water filtration
 
As hundreds of sites are identified across the United States, liability associated with the environmental and health implications of PFASs continues to grow exponentially. As science around the emerging contaminant class develops, additional PFASs become scrutinized and state regulatory requirements expand to accommodate them. Litigation associated with PFASs is expected to continue for years to come. 
 

—Shalene Thomas (Derouard), PMP is the Emerging Contaminants Program Manager with Amec Foster Wheeler Environment & Infrastructure Inc.  (Note, effective Oct. 9, 2017, Amec Foster Wheeler joined Wood, PLC).  Shalene can be contacted by email at Shalene.Thomas@woodplc.com or by phone at (612) 252-3697.

—Brad Glisson, CHMM is a Senior Environmental Scientist in the Amec Foster Wheeler’s Nashville, Tennessee office.  He can be contacted at brad.glisson@woodplc.com and (615) 333-0630.
 
Additional Information
 
read more »

Vanderbilt Law to Host Environmental Panel

Vanderbilt Law School is hosting a panel discussion on how to make environmental regulations more palatable to conservatives. The hour-long symposium will begin at noon on Monday in Flynn Auditorium. It is being hosted by Vanderbilt's Environmental Law and Policy Annual Review, the Energy and Environment Law Society and the Energy, Environment and Land Use Program. It is free and open to the public.

read more »

250k Tree Day Postponed

Due to the ongoing rain this week, as well as the thunderstorms forecasted for Saturday, the 250k Tree Day will be postponed to March 10 in order to ensure the safest and most effective project possible. Please email Jaclyn Mothupi directly by March 6 if you are signed up, but unable to volunteer on the new date. 
 
WHEN: Saturday, March 10, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. CST
 
WHAT: Planting and mulching trees at Long Hunter State Park. Limited shovels and gloves will be provided. If you are able to bring your own shovel and gloves, it is very much appreciated. Wear comfortable work clothes and closed-toe shoes. Morning coffee and refreshments will be provided. If the event is canceled due to weather, volunteers will receive an email alert with cancelation.  
 
WHERE: Long Hunter State Park, 2910 Hobson Pike, Hermitage, 37076. The tree planting will occur in the large field directly behind the Visitor Center. As you enter the park look for directional signage to the registration tent and flagged and designated parking area in the field. 
 
If you have any questions on the day of the event, you can reach Jaclyn by phone at 615-487-7814.
 
read more »

First Known Occurrence of Parasitic Disease Affecting Trout, Salmon in Tennessee Identified

The first-ever case of Whirling Disease in trout has been discovered in two East Tennessee tailwaters, reports The Chattanoogan. The contagion, a non-native microscopic parasite, has been detected in infected trout collected in the South Holston and Watauga tailwaters in East Tennessee according to the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA).
 
"So far, there has been no indication of negative impacts of whirling disease in the South Holston and Watauga tailwater trout populations," said Sally Petre, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency Trout Biologist. "Although the infected trout were collected in the South Holston and Watauga tailwaters, the more immediate concern is the spread of whirling disease to areas that may be more vulnerable such as wild trout streams."
 
TWRA biologists will be collecting trout in tailwaters across the state and within the South Holston and Watauga watersheds to determine the current distribution of the non-native parasite and the prevalence of whirling disease. Annual routine testing currently indicates that all TWRA hatchery facilities are disease free.
 
There is no known cure for the parasite that causes the condition, so the best way to protect Tennessee's fish population is to prevent it from spreading. While humans, pets and other types of fish are not at risk, Petre says the immediate concern is "the spread of whirling disease to areas that may be more vulnerable such as wild trout streams."
 
Whirling disease in part gets its name due to some infected fish which display a "whirling," or chasing of the tail behavior. Infected fish can also show damage to cartilage and skeletal tissue resulting in deformities in the head and spine. To learn more about the disease and its effect on encroached habitats, click here.
read more »

The Protest Movement as a Tool for Social Change: Fifty Years Post-King

The Ben F. Jones Chapter of the National Bar Association presents a dynamic day of programming in recognition of 50th anniversary of the death of Dr. Martin Luther King in Memphis. This program explores the protest that brought Dr. King to Memphis in 1968 and the legacy that his untimely death has left on the fabric of the city. The event will focus on the protest movement in its current state as well as provide updated information on the law surrounding assembly, protest and municipal responsibility.
 
The program features local historical figures who worked with Dr. King, representatives of the media, City of Memphis, local activists, attorneys and judges.
 
Speakers and producers include:
  • Barbara Arnwine, Esq., CEO and Founder of the Transformative Justice Coalition, Washington, D.C. 
  • Judge Earnestine Hunt Dorse, Municipal Court Judge, Memphis
  • Bill Cody, Burch, Porter and Johnson, Memphis
  • Earle Schwartz, Memphis Bar Association President, Memphis
  • Judge Bernice Bouie Donald, United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, Memphis
When: Feb. 23, 9 a.m. CST
 
Where: Fogleman Business Center, First Floor Amphitheater, 330 Innovation Dr., Memphis, Tennessee 38152
 
Contact Florence Johnson by email or call her at 901-725-7520 for more information.
read more »

TBA Gears Up for 2018 Mock Trial Tournament

The Tennessee Bar Association will host the upcoming Tennessee High School Mock Trial Tournament on March 23 and 24 in Nashville. The Mock Trial is a two-day, single-elimination bracket-style competition where 16 high schools face-off against each other in the Davidson County Courthouse. Each team is scored on their trial preparation and skills. 

We need TBA volunteers to help be bailiffs and jurors (scorers) for the event. After signing up, we will send you a Volunteer Memo with all the information you need for competition including; parking, hotel, downtown map, courthouse rules, and reimbursement information. Come be a part of the Young Lawyers Divisions’ March Madness! Feel free to contact YLD Director Stephanie Vonnahme with any questions.

To volunteer for this event, click here.

read more »

Lawsuit Calls Memphis Vacant Hotel Site Nuisance

The Shelby County Environmental Court will hear arguments to declare the remains of the former Benchmark Hotel in downtown Memphis a nuisance on Thursday. The Commercial Appeal reports that the Downtown Memphis Commission hopes to make MNR Hospitality LLC of Nashville produce a timeline of when the building will be torn down. Among other claims, the lawsuit alleges the old building is a public nuisance under the Tennessee Neighborhood Preservation Act.

read more »

Post-CLE Reception at TDEC

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), in cooperation with the Tennessee Bar Association’s Environmental Law Section, will host an open house immediately following Friday’s Environmental Law CLE on Feb. 2 at 4 p.m.
read more »

U.S. Supreme Court Rules District Courts Should Decide WOTUS Challenges

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously on Monday that district courts, not the appellate system, should decide legal challenges to what constitutes “Waters of the United States” under the Clean Water Act, NaturalGasIntel.com reports. Today, Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery applauded the decision, which reversed a 6th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling. In a statement, Slatery hailed the decision as a victory for state’s rights.
read more »

Chancellor Bryant Appointed to Statewide Water Resource Committee

Gov. Bill Haslam announced he has appointed a steering committee of leaders from federal, state and local governments, industry, academia, environmental advocacy groups and public utilities to develop a statewide plan for future water availability in Tennessee. The plan, TN H2O, will include an assessment of current water resources and recommendations to help ensure Tennessee has an abundance of water resources to support future population and economic growth. Chancellor Jerri S. Bryant, who has served the 10th judicial district for nearly 20 years, will serve on the committee. TN H2O will pay particular attention to surface and groundwater, water and wastewater infrastructure, water reuse and land conservation, as well as institutional and legal framework.
read more »

Don't Forget: Winter CLE Blast Tomorrow!

Need CLE hours fast? We can help! The annual Winter CLE Blast is less than a day away. With this program, you can complete up to 11 hours of Dual CLE credit on your own time. Our registration desk will be open from 7 a.m. to 6:45 p.m. on Feb. 21, providing you the flexibility to create your own schedule and take as many or as few hours as you need. Payment will be determined at checkout depending on the number of hours you attend. 

Highlights

  • Flexible to your schedule
  • Up to 11 Hours of CLE
  • Ethics Credits
  • Compliance CLE
  • Live Credit Hours

When: Feb. 21, registration begins at 7 a.m., CST

Where: Tennessee Bar Center, 221 4th Ave N., Nashville, TN 37219

 

read more »

Post-Forum Reception at TDEC

Don't forget, the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation in cooperation with the Tennessee Bar Association's Environmental Law Section will host an open house immediately following the Environmental Law Forum on Feb. 2 at 4 p.m. CDT in Nashville.
 
Don't miss this opportunity to meet leadership of the organization while networking with attorneys and professionals with a similar focus. Light snacks and refreshments will be provided. More details and address information are available on the TBA.org website. We hope to see you there!
 
read more »

TWRA Seeks Comment on 2018-19 Hunting Regulations, Elk Management Plan

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) is seeking public comment on regulations for the 2018 – 2019 hunting season and its Strategic Elk Management Plan, which serves as a guide for the agency’s decisions regarding the elk program. This provides an opportunity for Tennesseans to offer ideas and share concerns about hunting regulations with the agency’s staff, as well as weigh in on the 10-year elk management plan that aims to address healthy populations, habitat and public involvement. All comments will be considered by TWRA staff and may be presented as proposals for regulation changes. 

2018-19 Hunting Season Comments can be submitted via email or in writing to the address below. The comment period will be open through Thursday, Feb. 15. If sending an email, include "Hunting Season Comments" in the subject line. 

TWRA, Wildlife and Forestry Division
P.O. Box 40747
Nashville, TN 37204
 
Comments for the Elk Management Plan will be accepted until Friday, Feb. 16 and can be submitted via email or in writing to the address below. If sending an email, include "Elk Plan Comments" in the subject line. 
 
Attn. Elk Plan Comments
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency
3030 Wildlife Way
Morristown, TN 37814
read more »

DOI's Solicitor Defines Administration's Take on the Migratory Bird Protection Act Enforcement

A recent opinion from the office of the Department of Interior’s (DOI) solicitor has redefined how the current administration will address “incidental fatalities” pertaining to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). Congress passed MBTA in 1918, in response to public outcry over the mass slaughter of birds. The law prohibits killing or harming America’s birds except under certain conditions, including managed hunting seasons for game species.
 
Under the new interpretation of the law, “incidental” fatalities that are not the purpose of an action, “even if they are direct and foreseeable results, are no longer subject to potential criminal prosecution.” A press release from Akin Gump on behalf of the DOI states the purpose of this new interpretation is to “provide welcome relief to companies that unavoidably kill migratory birds, sometimes even after efforts to mitigate take and to comply with industry best practices or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service voluntary guidelines.”
 
This decision has incensed some conservation advocates, such as the Audubon Society, who was instrumental in the passage of MBTA. The full memorandum from the U.S. Department of Interior is available here.
read more »

What's Happening in the World of USTs

There are approximately 555,000 underground storage tanks (UST) nationwide that store petroleum or hazardous substances. The greatest potential threat from a leaking tank is contamination of groundwater, the source of drinking water for nearly half of all Americans. Along with the EPA, state organizations work in partnership with industry to protect the environment and human health from potential releases.
 
At this year’s Environmental Law Forum, we will address what is happening in the world of underground storage tanks from both Tennessee Department of Energy and Conservation’s and Tennessee Fuel and Convenience Store Association’s perspectives. This program will provide the opportunity to hear both viewpoints, along with updates from an interactive panel discussing the future of this ever-changing landscape.
 
To learn more and register for the forum, click here.
 
read more »

TDEC to Host Reception Following the Environmental Law Forum

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), in cooperation with the Tennessee Bar Association’s Environmental Law Section, will host an open house immediately following the Environmental Law Forum on Feb. 2.
 
TDEC manages Tennessee's state parks, the Tennessee Historical Commission and is legally responsible for the protection of Tennessee's air, water and soil quality. Currently, the Department has 14 divisions, overseeing programs for:
  • Air Pollution Control
  • Archaeology
  • Geology
  • Ground Water Protection
  • Internal Audit
  • Natural Heritage
  • Radiological Health
  • Remediation
  • Solid and Hazardous Waste Management
  • Underground Storage
  • Water Pollution Control
  • Water Supply
  • Recreational Services
  • Energy Oversight
 
Don’t miss this opportunity to meet leadership of the organization while networking with attorneys and professionals with a similar focus.
 
When: Feb. 2, 4 p.m., CDT
 
Where: Tennessee Department of Energy and Conservation, Tennessee Tower, 2nd Floor, 312 Rosa L. Parks Ave, Nashville, TN 37201
read more »

CLE Environmental Law Forum 2018

A CLE on environmental law will be held Feb. 2 at the Bar Center. Panelists from government, in-house, NGO, and private practice will discuss the scope of groundwater protection and jurisdiction, new regulations governing underground storage tanks, and the Clean Air Act's treatment of mobile sources, with specific focus on greenhouse gas emissions. 
read more »

Trees for All of Tennessee This Saturday

The Tennessee Environmental Council, with assistance from various sponsors, will plant 250,000 native tree seedlings across Tennessee. The 250K Tree Day project will be the largest tree-planting event in Tennessee history and is the largest tree-planting event in the United States, emphasizing the vision of "a Tennessee that embraces natural resources as the backbone of our communities, economy and quality of life for all present and future generations."  
 
The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation aims to recruit 25 volunteers to assist with this project at Long Hollow State Park, where 200 trees will be planted and mulched. Morning coffee, refreshments, shovels and gloves will be provided. Supervised kids are welcome. To register and receive follow-up project details, email Jaclyn Mothupi, or call 615-770-6980.
 
For those in the Memphis area who would like to get involved in 250K Tree Day, the Wolf River Conservancy will host a tree planting event on the same day in Shelby Farms Park. Registration for this event can be done online using this link. To locate an event or distributor in your area, Tennessee Tree Project has provided this guide which lists all participating locations.
 
When: Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. CDT
 
Where: Long Hunter State Park, 2910 Hobson Pike, Hermitage, Tennessee 37076
 
read more »

Reminder: Environmental Law Forum Set for February

The Tennessee Bar Association will host the 2018 Environmental Law Forum in Nashville on Feb. 2. This program offers advanced topics of concern to Tennessee lawyers who seek to broaden their awareness on local, state and national environmental laws and related litigation practice.
 
Do not miss this opportunity to fulfill CLE obligations while networking with professionals sharing your focus. Section members receive a discounted rate for the program. Here's the key info: 
 
When: Feb. 2, registration begins at 8 a.m., CDT
 
Where: Tennessee Bar Center, 221 4th Ave N., Nashville, TN 37219
 
Topics include:
  • Timely updates on legal issues involving groundwater, underground storage tanks, and automobile emissions
  • Groundwater protection and jurisdiction 
  • new regulations governing underground storage tanks
  • The Clean Air Act's treatment of mobile sources, with a specific focus on greenhouse gas emissions
Speakers/Producers include:
  • Lauran Sturm, TN Dept of Environment & Conservation
  • Ashley Ball, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation
  • Andy Binford, Tennessee Division of Remediation
  • Stan Boyd, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation
  • Raymond Coss, Nissan North America Inc
  • Emily LeRoy, Tennessee Fuel & Convenience Store Association
  • Anne Passino, Southern Environmental Law Center

read more »

Thanks to Our Section Leaders

Thanks to the members of the 2017 - 2018 TBA Environmental Law Section Executive Council for their service to the section this year. In addition to the production of CLE programming for the members, the executive council meets regularly throughout the year to produce news to the members and the recent Jon E. Hastings Memorial Award Writing Competition. Thanks to all for their dedication and hard work on behalf of the TBA Environmental Law Section.
 
OFFICERS
 
• Lauran Sturm, Chair
Tennessee Department of Environment & Convservation (Nashville)
 
• Jenny Howard, Vice-Chair
Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation (Nashville)
 
• Willa Kalaidjian, Immediate Past Chair
Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel, P.C. (Chattanooga)
 
• Robert "Jaz" Boon, Newsletter Editor
Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP (Nashville)
 
• Bob Tuke, Secretary/Treasurer
Trauger & Tuke (Nashville)
 
MIDDLE TENNESSEE DELEGATES
 
• Elizabeth Alexander
Southern Environmental Law Center (Nashville)
 
• Gregory T. Young
Stites & Harbison PLLC (Nashville)
 
• Scott Thomas
Bass, Berry & Sims PLC (Nashville)
 
WEST TENNESSEE DELEGATES
 
• Jim Lenschau
Martin, Tate, Morrow & Marston, P.C. (Memphis)
 
• Randy Womack
Glankler Brown PLLC (Memphis)
 
• Robert McLean
Farris Bobango Branan PLC (Memphis)
 
EAST TENNESSEE DELEGATES
 
• Ashley Lowe
Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC (Knoxville)
 
• David Higney
Grant, Konvalinka & Harrison, PC (Chattanooga)
 
• Rick Hitchcock
Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel P.C. (Chattanooga)
 
read more »

Thanks to Our Sponsor

 
Tioga is a Tennessee UST Approved Corrective Action contractor. Based in Memphis, the firm will assist with regulatory compliance, environmental assessments and remediation. Its mission is to make the world a cleaner and safer place each day. 

read more »