News

Tennessee Infrastructure Needs $45 Billion for Next 5 Years

Tennessee's annual estimate of costs for needed roads, schools, parks and other infrastructure is now $45 billion in the five years between 2016 and 2021 reports the Chattanooga Times Free Press. This is an increase of about $2 billion, or 4.7 percent, from last year, according to the Tennessee Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, or TACIR, a research institution that explores solutions for state and local governments.
 
In its latest report issued Monday, TACIR hopes that the infrastructure inventory could help local communities to woo federal dollars under President Donald Trump's pending infrastructure plan. The report includes a statewide overview chapter with information by type of infrastructure, the condition and needs of our public-school facilities, the availability of funding to meet reported needs and a comparison of county-area need, including one-page summaries for each Tennessee county.
 
Costs for current infrastructure needs fall into six general categories:
  • Transportation and utilities: $24.8 billion
  • Education: $10.4 billion
  • Health, safety, and welfare: $6.9 billion
  • Recreation and culture: $1.8 billion
  • General government: $767 million
  • Economic development: $360 million
Preliminary discussions of Trump's infrastructure plan indicate states could receive rural infrastructure funds if they have plans for investing the money. The TACIR news release said the report "could provide a foundation for meeting this or similar requirements." The report in its entirety can be found here.
 
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The Protest Movement as a Tool for Social Change: Fifty Years Post-King

The Ben F. Jones Chapter of the National Bar Association presents a dynamic day of programming in recognition of 50th anniversary of the death of Dr. Martin Luther King in Memphis. This program explores the protest that brought Dr. King to Memphis in 1968 and the legacy that his untimely death has left on the fabric of the city. The event will focus on the protest movement in its current state as well as provide updated information on the law surrounding assembly, protest and municipal responsibility.
 
The program features local historical figures who worked with Dr. King, representatives of the media, City of Memphis, local activists, attorneys and judges.
 
Speakers and producers include:
  • Barbara Arnwine, Esq., CEO and Founder of the Transformative Justice Coalition, Washington, D.C. 
  • Judge Earnestine Hunt Dorse, Municipal Court Judge, Memphis
  • Bill Cody, Burch, Porter and Johnson, Memphis
  • Earle Schwartz, Memphis Bar Association President, Memphis
  • Judge Bernice Bouie Donald, United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, Memphis
When: Feb. 23, 9 a.m. CST
 
Where: Fogleman Business Center, First Floor Amphitheater, 330 Innovation Dr., Memphis, Tennessee 38152
 
Contact Florence Johnson by email or call her at 901-725-7520 for more information.
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TBA General-Solo-Small Firm Practitioners Section Supports Legislation to End Professional License Suspension for Failure to Pay Student Loans

At their monthly meeting held Feb. 7, the Executive Council of the General-Solo-Small Firm Practitioners Section voted unanimously to support legislation to curtail the practice of regulatory boards suspending professional licenses for failure to repay student loans. The legislation, HB1487 / SB1766, was introduced in the House by Representatives McCormick and Powell and in the Senate by Senator Green. 
 
This has been a concern of this Section of the TBA for several years motivated by the huge investment of time and sacrifice it takes to obtain the education and licenses involved, coupled with the fact that it is sometimes hard to find employment that generates enough income that is required to meet basic living expenses and repay these kinds of debts. It makes no sense to further cripple the ability to repay the debt by revoking the very license that is supposed to provide a vehicle for getting that done.  
 
The Executive Committee urges its members to contact other lawyers and members of other regulated professions and to encourage them to call or write their legislators in support of this legislation.
 
—General-Solo-Small Firm Practitioners Section Chair Jim Romer can be contacted by email, or by phone at 931-879-8144.
 

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White Nationalist Claims He Can't Get a Lawyer, Wants Charlottesville Suit Tossed

Richard Spencer— white nationalist and president of the National Policy Institute, an "alt-right" think tank and lobbying group— has filed a pro se motion to dismiss a lawsuit filed against him as a result of the recent Charlottesville, VA protests over removal of controversial statues honoring Confederate generals which left one dead and dozens injured. The suit, filed in federal district court of Virginia in Oct. 2017, alleges the plaintiffs were injured, harassed, intimidated and assaulted by the white supremacist groups in the city.
 
In the motion, Spencer claims that the blame for violence falls on the anti-fascists, or Antifa, who showed up to protest he and his cohorts' ideas and on the police, who he says did too little to discourage the violence. "Harsh and bold words, as well as scuffles, are simply a reality of political protests, which are, by their very nature, contentious and controversial," Spencer wrote. "Free societies, not only in the United States but around the world, accept this as a cost of free assembly and maintaining a vibrant political culture."
 
According to the document, Spencer maintains that he is unable to find an attorney due to the controversial nature of the case despite "the supposed but apparently illusory ethical obligation lawyers have to represent unpopular clients and to assure at least a semblance of a fair trial." "The plaintiffs, in this case, have enormous resources at their disposal. Several major law firms, likely working pro bono, with probably dozens of attorneys and deep pockets for depositions and other discovery expenses are lined up to represent them." said Spencer.
 
The motion in its entirety can be read here.
 
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TBA Gears Up for 2018 Mock Trial Tournament

The Tennessee Bar Association will host the upcoming Tennessee High School Mock Trial Tournament on March 23 and 24 in Nashville. The Mock Trial is a two-day, single-elimination bracket-style competition where 16 high schools face-off against each other in the Davidson County Courthouse. Each team is scored on their trial preparation and skills. 

We need TBA volunteers to help be bailiffs and jurors (scorers) for the event. After signing up, we will send you a Volunteer Memo with all the information you need for competition including; parking, hotel, downtown map, courthouse rules, and reimbursement information. Come be a part of the Young Lawyers Divisions’ March Madness! Feel free to contact YLD Director Stephanie Vonnahme with any questions.

To volunteer for this event, click here.

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Appeals Court Ruling Calls Tennessee DUI Conviction 'Fee System' Unconstitutional

Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals has ruled that a state law giving the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation a $250 fee in DUI convictions is unconstitutional. The ruling is a result of a Hamilton County DUI case of a woman who argued her blood test should be suppressed because the fee system violated her right to a fair trial and gave the TBI a financial motivation to get convictions. The case was consolidated with more than 20 others of defendants who gave blood or breath samples to authorities.

The appeals court said in the 28-page ruling, "Based on the record before us, the TBI, and specifically, the forensic science division is dependent on these BADT (blood alcohol or drug concentration test) fees. Given the upward trend in BADT collections for each successive year, we believe that the TBI will become increasingly reliant on these fees in the future, which only serves to heighten the potential for bias among TBI forensic scientists. The fee system in TCA § 55-10-413(f) also closely resembles cases in which expert witnesses or attorneys have been disqualified for conflicts of interest."

The Tennessee Attorney General's Office is reviewing the decision, which could be appealed, according to the Tennessean. The income from the fee has been increasing and now is above $3 million per year, the paper reports.

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Access to Justice Commission Seeking Feedback

The Tennessee Supreme Court’s Access to Justice Commission is seeking input from the legal community to help in planning efforts as it develops a new strategic plan in March. A brief survey is available for all who wish to share thoughts and feedback. The survey will remain open through Feb. 7. Please contact Anne-Louise Wirthlin at the Administrative Office of the Courts with questions or for more information. 

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Extraordinary Appeal Granted in Brentwood Academy Assault Lawsuit

Last week, the Tennessee Court of Appeals granted an application for extraordinary appeal in the Brentwood Academy assault lawsuit, according to The Tennessean. This decision reignites the controversial dispute previously dismissed by Williamson County Circuit Court Judge Deanna Johnson. The suit, filed in August 2017, alleges John Doe was repeatedly sexually assaulted in a locker room by older students during the 2014-15 school year. It also alleges that school officials failed to appropriately respond to and prevent the attacks. 
 
The case took a surprising turn last month when it was dismissed by Johnson amidst an argument over the deposition of Bureon Ledbetter, an attorney for the John Doe and family. Ledbetter argued the information he was asked to reveal through the deposition would violate attorney-client privilege. Johnson said Ledbetter could file an objection but must answer. If he did not, she threatened to put him in jail for contempt, according to court documents. At that point, the Does' second attorney, Justin Gilbert, tried to withdraw the case without prejudice, with the intent to refile. However, the same day Johnson granted an order requested by Brentwood Academy attorneys to dismiss the case with prejudice. Despite Johnson's order dismissing the case, the Williamson County court docket states the case is technically still open as Johnson still needs to file a findings of fact offering an explanation as to why the case was dismissed. 
 
Both the school and the accused students have denied all wrongdoing.
 
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Glen Campbell's Longtime Publicist Subpoenaed Regarding Contested Will

The longtime publicist of Glen Campbell, who passed away from Alzheimer's Disease last year, has been subpoenaed to testify regarding the late singer's competence when he signed a now-disputed will, according to The Tennessean.

Records in Davidson County Probate Court show a subpoena has been issued for Sanford Brokaw to appear for testimony in Nashville on Feb. 20. The subpoena calls on Brokaw to "provide proof of the decedent's capacity since 2002” and submit "all communications regarding the estate of the decedent."

The contention is regarding the exclusion of three of Campbell's children, who have been cut out of his estimated $50 million estate, according to a 13-page will filed by his widow in 2006, Rolling Stone reported. The will states that he was "specifically excluding" the three children from receiving anything under the will or a related trust, and names his wife, Kim, as executor. Court records indicate there was an earlier version of Campbell's will, dated in 2002.

This was not the first interfamilial feud, as Campbell’s eldest daughter Debby and son Travis previously won a legal victory after claiming that Kim Campbell was denying them the right to visit their father during his illness. Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam subsequently signed a bill into law called the Campbell / Falk Act, which allows family members and close friends of a person with Alzheimer’s disease, dementia or other disabilities to visit a loved one in person, or maintain contact with them by phone, email or mail, despite the stated wishes of a legally appointed conservator.

Campbell was first diagnosed with the Alzheimer’s in 2011 and died in August 2017. A Netflix film, "I’ll Be Me", details his diagnosis, final tour and his farewell to fans.

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Don't Forget: Winter CLE Blast Just Around the Corner

Need CLE hours fast? We can help! The annual Winter CLE Blast is just a couple of weeks away. With this program, you can complete up to 11 hours of Dual CLE credit on your own time. Our registration desk will be open from 7 a.m. to 6:45 p.m. on Feb. 21, providing you the flexibility to create your own schedule and take as many or as few hours as you need. Payment will be determined at checkout depending on the number of hours you attend. 

Highlights

  • Flexible to your schedule
  • Up to 11 Hours of CLE
  • Ethics Credits
  • Compliance CLE
  • Live Credit Hours

When: Feb. 21, registration begins at 7 a.m., CST

Where: Tennessee Bar Center, 221 4th Ave N., Nashville, TN 37219

 

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CLE Opportunities for Solo Practitioners

The Tennessee Bar Association will host upcoming CLE events geared towards assisting solo practitioners with the unique problems faced in starting their own practice and how to further advance their practice once established. 
 
The programs - Go SOLO: Tools for Starting Your Practice and I am SOLO: What's Next for The Solo Practice - will focus on topics such as:
 
  • Are you ready
  • People skills
  • Start-up costs
  • Business operations
  • Allocation of resources
  • Entering the market
  • How to promote yourself
  • Expanding your office
  • Considering additional partners
  • Combining services with another small firm
  • Opening another office or adding more support staff
Do not miss this opportunity to learn from seasoned professionals who have dealt with and overcome these challenges, while you fulfill your necessary CLE obligations. Section members receive a discounted rate for the programs. Both will be simulcast online, should you be unable to make it in person. Here's the key info:
 
 
When: Feb. 8, registration begins at 8:30 a.m., CDT
 
Where: Tennessee Bar Center, 221 4th Ave N., Nashville, TN 37219
 
 
When: Feb. 8, registration begins at 11:45 a.m., CDT
 
Where: Tennessee Bar Center, 221 4th Ave N., Nashville, TN 37219
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Michigan Judge Tells Convicted Killer 'I Hope You Die in Prison'

A Michigan judge became incensed during a sentencing hearing and told the defendant "I hope you die in prison." Judge John McBain was ruling in the case of 31-year-old Camia Gamet, when the defendant appeared to mock the victim's grieving family by rolling her eyes, causing the judge to lose his temper.
 
Gamet was convicted in March of fatally stabbing her boyfriend, Marcel Hill. According to WNEM in Lansing, McBain called it one of the worst cases he has ever seen. He told Gamet that she "gutted [Hill] like a fish.' 'If this was a death penalty state, you'd be getting the chair," said the judge.
 
McBain also threatened to tape Gamet's mouth shut, saying, "You're going to shut your mouth or I'm going to have some duct tape put on it." Gamet was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.
 
This is not the first time the acrimonious adjudicator has made news for his candid outbursts. McBain once tackled and subdued a man who resisted being taken into custody and has been repeatedly accused of partiality and hostility in his courtroom.
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Go SOLO: Tools for Starting Your Practice

Are you ready to go solo? This three-hour online video program will help you decide if a solo practice is right for you. Sessions addressing business and marketing will help you determine whether you have the entrepreneurial know-how to start your own practice. Find out if you are ready for the solo challenge and learn how to set up a business and set yourself apart. 
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6th U.S. Circuit Judge Hands Down First Published Opinion in a Constitutional Case

Recently appointed 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge John K. Bush handed down his first published opinion in a constitutional case, Peffer v. Stephens, last Thursday. The case is a civil suit challenging probable cause in the issuance of a search warrant. 
 
Jesse Peffer served as a caregiver for medical marijuana patients in Michigan, permitting him to grow a limited number of cannabis plants. When his plants produced more marijuana than he needed, Peffer sold the surplus to Tom Beemer, who ran a medical marijuana dispensary. Unbeknownst to Peffer, Beemer was a confidential informant to state and local police. 
 
One day, Beemer asked Peffer to sell him more surplus marijuana than is permitted under state law. The two agreed and police stopped the appellant as he drove to the meeting, finding more marijuana in his car than he was licensed to possess. Peffer was arrested and charged.
 
Eight months later, the local school district and child services agency received typewritten letters purporting to be from one of the police officers who arrested Peffer. These letters accused Beemer of distributing a controlled substance and becoming a confidential informant "in exchange for immunity/leniency in sentencing." Investigators determined it was most likely Peffer who authored and distributed the letters and flyers and obtained a warrant to search for and seize records relating to the activities including in electronic form.
 
To search Peffer's house for evidence, the police needed "probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." A detective submitted an affidavit to the court asserting he had probable cause to believe Peffer's residence "may contain evidence of the crime of Impersonating a Police Officer and Witness Intimidation." The detective asked permission to search Peffer's house for "computer hardware," "computer-related equipment," printers, scanners, any "electronic storage device," and Peffer's personal email.
 
After searching the appellant's house and electronics, law enforcement found nothing incriminating; prosecutors elected not to press charges. Peffer and his wife sued a detective sergeant with the Michigan State Police alleging a violation of their Fourth Amendment rights. A lower court threw out their suit, and Bush affirmed its decision in a unanimous decision for a three-judge panel.
 
Prior to his confirmation, Bush came under fire because of a history of making blog comments that have been construed as sexist and homophobic. He has been an outspoken critic of LGBT protection laws and used an offensive anti-LGBTQ slur when giving a speech to the Forum Club of Louisville. Bush co-authored an amicus brief on behalf of a conservative group opposing the admission of women into the Virginia Military Institute, asserting that VMI “does not appear to be compatible with the somewhat different developmental needs of most young women.” He has also been criticized for remarks made comparing abortion to slavery.
 
The full decision can be viewed here.
 
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General Practice Updates: The Evolution of Lawyer Competency

In this online video, Suzanne Rose will discuss how lawyer competency is being redefined. Topics will include the most significant disrupters affecting your practice and the new knowledge and skills needed to maintain your own competence in today's changing environment. 
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Tennessee Department of Revenue Reaches Agreement with Airbnb

Airbnb recently struck a deal with the Tennessee Department of Revenue to collect and remit state and local taxes on behalf of its 7,700 hosts, according to the Nashville Business Journal. This arrangement has been used in other markets to address concerns regarding tax revenue from their short-term rentals not being on par with that of their hotel competitors. Tennessee joins neighboring states of Kentucky, Missouri, Alabama, Mississippi and Arkansas as areas with similar agreements. 
 
This news comes as Metro Council was scheduled to vote on BL-937, an ordinance amending Title 6 and sections 17.04.060, 17.08.030, 17.16.250 and 17.16.070 of the Metropolitan Code of Laws to add a new Chapter 6.83 pertaining to a short-term rental properties advisory committee and to establish regulations regarding short-term rental properties and distinct land uses for "Short-term rental property - Owner-Occupied" and "Short-term rental property - Not Owner-Occupied." The vote, however, was commuted to Jan. 23 because of inclement weather.
 
The company has long been a source of controversy in the area because of various concerns of taxation, noise complaints, even sparking First Amendment debates regarding anatomically correct sex dolls. In fact, problems with Airbnb rentals have become so numerous, Nashville Mayor Megan Barry established a devoted hotline tasked with aggregating and addressing these concerns.
 
The new statewide tax agreement, which will take effect March 1, is the second such deal Airbnb has struck in Tennessee, following an earlier agreement with Memphis. Airbnb has touted the agreements as a revenue generator and a reason for governments to work with — not against — the company.
 
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Go Solo CLE Series for Beginners and the Experienced

The Go Solo and I Am Solo series offers tips and best practices for the solo lawyer — a perfect combo CLE for lawyers who want to start their own practice. The beginner sessions will help you determine if you are ready for the solo challenge and learn how to set up a business and set yourself apart. For those who are in their first few years of solo practice, our advanced topics will help you kick it up a notch.  
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Rep. Faison Files Bill Aimed at Ending Private Prison Usage in State

Rep. Jeremy Faison, R-Crosby, has filed legislation taking aim at private prison usage in Tennessee, according to the Tennessean. SB1585 proposes an amendment to TCA Title 41, Chapter 24, prohibiting contracts for the operation of prison facilities from containing occupancy level guarantees, in which the state promises to keep its prison at 90 percent capacity or pay the contractor as though the prison were 90 percent full even if it's not. Private prison opponents argue that these guarantees act as a monetary incentive for states to keep prisons full.
 
Faison predicts the bill will be hotly contested, as Tennessee is home to the second largest private corrections company in the United States, CoreCivic, formerly Corrections Corporation of America. The spokesman for the company, Amanda Gilchrist, recently told the Tennessean that "fewer than half of our contracts include such a provision. Those contracts that include a guarantee ensure our government partners that sufficient space to safely and securely house their offenders in the facility is available to them." 
 
CoreCivic has long been the center of controversy, most recently because of a report from the state Comptroller’s Office, which cites inadequate staffing and supervision of inmates, both persistent problems for the beleaguered corporation. "The U.S. Constitution says that government is supposed to carry out justice," said Faison. "Our Tennessee state Constitution says that government is supposed to carry out justice, not, 'somebody who’s trying to make money gets to carry out justice.' That's crazy."
 
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Write it Up: TBJ Fiction Contest is Now Open

The Tennessee Bar Journal's Second Annual Fiction Contest is underway! We know that in your real job you don't get to make stuff up, so now is your chance to be loose with the facts and write wildly creatively. Send your fiction in by March 12 to be considered. The winning entry will be published in the June 2018 issue of the Journal, and the author will receive a $100 gift card from a favorite independent bookstore.

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Traffic Ticket App Startup Sues Florida Bar for Antitrust Violations

A Florida startup that matches lawyers to drivers who’ve received traffic tickets is suing the Florida Bar and a law firm for allegedly launching a “coordinated attack” to kill its business, the ABA Journal reports. Mobile app developer TIKD Services filed suit in federal court against the Florida Bar and a competitor called The Ticket Clinic. The Florida Bar began investigating TIKD 10 months ago, probing into whether the company was engaged in the unauthorized practice of law, and issued an informal opinion about it. Additionally The Ticket Clinic filed ethics complaints against attorneys who worked with TIKD customers, according to the lawsuit.
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Reminder: TBA Fall Annual Review Set for Nashville

The TBA Fall Annual Review is just around the corner on Nov. 3. This annual program remains the preeminent opportunity for Tennessee general, solo and small firm practitioners to network with other lawyers sharing their legal focus while obtaining necessary CLE requirements. As with other CLE programs, section members receive a discounted rate to attend.
 
This year’s review will feature 30 tips in 60 minutes from TBA General-Solo Section Chair Jim Romer, who holds degrees from St. Bernard's College, Catholic University of America and the University of Tennessee. Some of the topics that will be addressed in this presentation include:
 
When the TBI Comes Calling, Proving an Act Of God
They Held Title to The House as Married, But They Weren’t. Then He Died. Fix It
How Mother Gave Away the Family Farm. Sometimes Where There’s a Will There’s Not a Way
Small Town Access to Justice - Pro Bono Heavy #1 - A Child’s Transplant Trust Story
Small Town Access to Justice - Pro Bono Heavy #2 - They Bought the Trailer. Now Clean Up the Title”
So You Want to Own Your Own Law Business and Be Your Own Boss - A Guide for Filing, Reporting, Paying and Other Dreaded Things
Real Estate - The Best Idea I Ever Had and Resources for Deed Writing and Title Work
 
When: Nov. 3, registration begins at 8, CDT
 
Where: Tennessee Bar Center, 2nd Floor, 221 4th Ave N., Nashville, TN 37219
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Court Square Series Kicks Off in Chattanooga

On Sept. 21, this year’s Court Square series kicks off in Chattanooga at Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel. Kevin Christopher will address common intellectual property issues for general practitioners. Jay Elliott will cover issues attorneys may encounter when handling matters with in-house counsel and Chris Varner will provide a summary of litigation updates. The last session will be a roundtable discussion offering point and counterpoint scenarios in connection with various contract provisions. For more information or to register.   

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Elder Law Basics

Make plans to join us for this exciting program. This program is for attorneys who want to understand what elder law practice is all about or are looking for a quick refresher course on the basics. Two sessions will focus on government benefits, this will include Medicaid and a review of VA benefits. Speakers will address best practices for Power of Attorneys and help you identify the client's needs and determining capacity. Click here to sign up today.

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License Suspension Policy Survey

A number of sections in the Tennessee Code authorize licensing agencies to suspend a professional license or certification for failure to pay student loans. Most of these sections are derived from 1999 Pub. Acts ch. 476 and 2012 Pub. Acts ch. 519. In addition, Section 37 of Tenn. Sup. Ct. Rule 9 provides for suspension of an attorney’s license when the attorney has been determined to be in default on a repayment or service obligation under any federal family education loan program, a student loan guaranteed or administered by the Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation (“TSAC”), or any other state or federal educational loan or service-conditional scholarship program.
 
The General Practice Solo and Small Firm Practitioners Section wishes to propose the following policy change: A repeal of all Tennessee Codes, and Supreme Court rules, that address the suspension of an attorney's license for failure to pay student loans. For more details, please see attached memorandum. The Executive Council is asking for feedback on this policy change, and requesting that members of the section complete the following survey by August 21. 
 
Please see comments below from James Romer, chair of the General Practice Solo and Small Firm Practitioners Section, on this policy change. 
 
Frank, and fellow members of the Executive Committee of the General – Solo – Small Practice Section, all members of our Section, and TBA staff. I have witnessed Frank’s efforts to address this issue for years. Taking licenses for failure to timely repay a debt to get a license is very hurtful to members of our section. In my judgment we need to take a firm position to do away with it. 
 
The very heart of the problem of taking a license simply for failing pay a debt is that a person with a license has made an incredible sacrifice to get it. It represents an investment of years of his or her lifetime just to get the education. Then they have successfully passed through the gauntlet of the licensing exam. On top of that they were successful in providing references to the quality of their character for it to be issued to them. Their whole purpose for putting out such an effort is to be able to have a tool to help raise their ability to support themselves and a family and to use it to help others.
 
Sometimes despite all that sacrifice, all of us need to face the fact that for some period of time there may not be sufficient income using that tool to serve their basic needs, begin a family life, start up a business because there are no “salaried jobs with benefits” available -- and pay the debt too. When the tool is taken away by the debt collector aided and abetted by the legal scheme set out in the Memorandum, a chunk of their lifetime has been stolen from them along with the very means ever to repay the debt the debt collector wants to collect. It’s as senseless as shooting a trained marathon runner in the foot to see if it will improve his ability to compete in a marathon!
 
I applaud Frank’s efforts.  Please add your comments and submit them.  Even if you don’t have any additional comments, please complete the SURVEY and submit it.  We just need to know your individual position as best you can on the issue. 
 
Thank you, 
 
Jim Romer, Section Chair
 
James P. Romer 
 
To complete the survey, please click here. Please complete the survey no later than August 21. 
 
 

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Ten Tips for Better Trial Practice

Here are ten tips for better trial practice from Judge Dale Tipps.