News

Federalist Society Hosts Discussion on Health Care Law

The Memphis Lawyers' Chapter of the Federalist Society will present "An Overview of the Oral Arguments before the United States Supreme Court in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Cases" with Gregory G. Katsas of Jones Day – one of the attorneys who argued the case before the high court. The event will take place tomorrow (Thursday) from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at The Madison Hotel. Cost is $25 for society members and $30 for non-members. Lunch is included. To register contact Greg Grisham at (901) 312-9413 or greg.grisham@leitnerfirm.com.

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GOP Continues to Attack President Over Court Comments

President Barack Obama's remarks earlier this week about the U.S. Supreme Court's consideration of the health care law continue to generate backlash from political opponents. In a speech today, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., continued the GOP counteroffensive, telling the president to "back off" the court. "The President crossed a dangerous line this week. And anyone who cares about liberty needs to call him out on it. The independence of the Court must be defended," McConnell said. Read more on politico.com

Meanwhile, the Justice Department today made good on its promise to file a brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit outlining the government's view of judicial authority to review laws enacted by Congress. The Blog of Legal Times has that story

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Health Care Forum Scheduled in Bristol

The Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, Va., and Wellmont Health System will sponsor a panel discussion on the legal challenges to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on Monday. The event will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Monarch Auditorium at Bristol Regional Medical Center. A reception will follow. On Tuesday, the law school will host Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli – a key figure in the case against the law – who will meet with faculty, staff and students. For more information contact Saundra Latham at the law school at slatham@asl.edu or (276) 935-4349, Ext. 1240.

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Editorial: Lawmakers Must Be Ready for Health Care Decision

In an editorial, the News Sentinel says that the U.S Supreme Court’s decision about the Affordable Care Act will affect Tennesseans either way it goes and that the state legislature must be poised to act. “The Legislature has put off setting up a health care exchange, with the Republican majority betting on the law's demise,” the paper says. “But if it passes, lawmakers must act before the end of the year or allow the federal government to create one. And if the law is struck down, it must be replaced with a law that addresses the failures of the health care system that gave birth to the law in the first place.” Read the editorial

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Malpractice Bill Criticized by TAJ

Legislation permitting health care providers to gain access to the medical records of anyone filing a medical malpractice claim was considered by the House Judiciary Committee this week. The bill, HB 2979, would supersede federal HIPAA laws and allow an attorney, representing a health care provider, to access a plaintiff's medical history, including mental health and past drug or alcohol abuse treatments, according to the Murfreesboro Post. The Tennessee Association for Justice called the bill an outrageous invasion of privacy and a tool for defense attorneys to intimidate victims of medical negligence and abuse. The Post has more

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Court Wraps Up Health Care Arguments

On the third day of oral arguments on legal challenges to the 2010 Affordable Care Act, the justices first tackled the question of what would happen if they ruled that the heart of the law, the individual mandate, is unconstitutional. A second session this afternoon looked at whether states would be "coerced" by the federal government to expand their share of Medicaid costs or risk losing federal funding. Wednesday's session also gave Solicitor General Donald Verrilli a chance to regain the rhetorical offensive many said he lost on Tuesday. The questioning of his performance was so widespread that the White House issued a statement today defending him. Read more from the day at WCYB.com and get access to transcripts and legal analysis on SCOTUSblog

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Day 2: ACA Arguments Put Obama Lawyers on Defensive

On the second day of arguments on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, U.S. Supreme Court conservative justices put the Obama administration's top lawyer on the defensive, possibly forecasting a closer-than-expected Supreme Court decision, the Blog of Legal Times says. The justices appeared split on whether the federal government can force people to buy health insurance, according to National Public Radio. The court's conservatives appeared skeptical and unmoved by the government's arguments in favor of the mandate that requires just about everyone in the U.S. to have health insurance starting in 2014.

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Supreme Court Says No to Human Gene Patents

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday threw out a lower court ruling allowing human genes to be patented, a topic of enormous interest to cancer researchers, patients and drug makers. The court overturned patents belonging to Myriad Genetics Inc. of Salt Lake City on two genes linked to increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The Daily News has the AP story

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Health Care Case Could Define Roberts’ Legacy

U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr will begin presiding over an extraordinary three days of arguments in late March that will determine the fate of President Obama’s sweeping health care law. The case will also shape, if not define, Chief Justice Roberts’ legacy. The New York Times looks at the options Roberts will be weighing. Working on the case against the president’s health care overhaul is former Solicitor General Paul D. Clement, a law school classmate of Barack Obama. Clement used to argue for the federal government's power -- until he started arguing against it. The News Sentinel tells this story.

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Long Named Assistant Commissioner

Michelle J. Long has been named assistant commissioner of health licensure and regulation for the state of Tennessee. She has been a lawyer for the Tennessee Hospital Association and executive director of the Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission. Read more in the Tennessean.

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Class Action Over Denial of Autism Treatment May Proceed

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit ruled today that a class action against Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan over the company's denial of a particular therapy for autism can move ahead.  The plaintiffs initially sued Blue Cross in 2010 for reimbursement for what is known as Applied Behavior Analysis therapy, under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). They also sought a court ruling that they're entitled to future coverage for the therapy costs. The National Law Journal has the details.

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