News

Courthouse Dogs Program Helps Children in Court

The Child Advocacy Center of Charlotte and the Courthouse Dogs Foundation recently joined together with Humphreys County court officials to discuss a new program in Waverly. Under the new program, Courthouse Dogs would assist and comfort sexually abused children while they go through forensic interviews and testify in court. The dogs are trained by organizations that are members of Assistance Dogs International. Experts say the dogs play two key roles in the courtroom -- making victims feel safe and less anxious, and reducing stress levels. Learn more from the Leaf Chronicle

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Editorial: Juvenile Court Deal Comes with Price Tag

Compliance with an agreement reached between the U.S Department of Justice (DOJ) and Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court last week is "well worth" the estimated cost the county government, the Memphis Flyer argues in an editorial today. However, the paper warns that the price tag of $4.5 to $6.5 million will strain the already financially strapped county government, and that Shelby County Mayor Mark Lutrell's bid for emergency funding from the state will exacerbate the existing shaky relationship he has with the county commission.

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Russia Passes Ban on U.S. Adoptions

Lawmakers in Moscow effectively banned Americans from adopting Russian children by passing a bill that imposes a series of sanctions on U.S. interests, WCYB News reports. The move is widely seen as retaliation against the Magnitsky Act, which President Obama signed on Dec. 14. That law imposes U.S. travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in Russia. Russia is one of the top countries of origin for international adoptions in the United States, behind only China, with more than 60,000 Russian children joining American families in the past 20 years.

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Suit Demands DCS Release Public Records

The Tennessean and a coalition of the state’s newspapers, television stations and other media organizations filed a lawsuit Wednesday in Davidson County Chancery Court against the Department of Children’s Services (DCS), alleging the agency is violating the law by refusing to make public the records of children who died after being brought to the agency for attention. According to Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis attorney Robb Harvey, who represents the Tennessean, this is the largest coalition of Tennessee media organizations in terms of number, geographic scope, readership and viewership ever to file a public records lawsuit.

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Deal Reached to Reform Shelby Co. Juvenile System

An agreement to overhaul Shelby County Juvenile Court, expected to cost $4.5 million to $6.5 million, was finalized Monday between court and county officials and the U.S. Department of Justice, The Commercial Appeal reports. The plan, officially announced today, addresses problems such as the disparate treatment of black youths, the high number of youth transferred to adult court, and due process rights violations. If the county doesn't carry out the reforms, federal officials have said they likely would file suit to force changes. While many Memphis officials applauded the plan, members of the Shelby County Commission were surprised by the deal saying they were not asked to weigh in on the agreement. The commission chair reportedly has asked the county attorney for a legal opinion as to whether the mayor has authority to make the agreement without commission approval.

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Task Force Working to Improve Child Protection Efforts

A task force on child protection wants more consistency in how reports of abuse are investigated and how decisions about criminal charges are made in the state. The group, comprised of Department of Children's Services (DCS) officials, doctors, law enforcement, attorneys and child advocates, is set to release a draft of its findings next month, Knoxnews.com says. In its report, the task force is expected to recommend that investigative teams train together; that communication be improved between DCS, law enforcement and community service agencies; and that additional funding be provided to hire more caseworkers and increase current caseworkers’ salaries.

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Williamson County to Swear in First Juvenile Court Judge

Sharon E. Guffee will be sworn in next Wednesday as Williamson County’s first Juvenile Court Judge, the Williamson Herald reports. In June, the Williamson County Commission voted unanimously to appoint Guffee to the position effective Jan. 1, 2013. Guffee is a graduate of the Nashville School of Law and previously worked as an Assistant District Attorney for the 21st Judicial Districts and in private practice.

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Rigsby Sworn in as New Juvenile Magistrate

Melinda Rigsby was sworn in this week as a new magistrate at Davidson County Juvenile Court, filling the vacancy created by the appointment of Sophia Brown Crawford as judge. Rigsby has worked as an assistant District Attorney since 1995 at Juvenile Court and later General Sessions Court. Read more at TN Courts.

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U.S. Joins International Effort Against Pedophilia

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and European Union Commissioner for Home Affairs Cecilia Malmstrom will launch a global alliance targeting online child sexual abuse this week. Officials from 27 EU member nations and 22 other countries will gather for a conference tomorrow in Brussels to being laying the foundation for the effort. The participating nations are making a commitment to care for victims, enhance efforts to prosecute offenders, increase children's awareness of online risks and reduce the availability of child abuse material online. WATE.com has this AP story

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Truancy Reforms Urged in Tennessee

The University of Tennessee College of Law’s Education Law Practicum has examined truancy laws, data and enforcement across the state for the past four years. According to the Chattanooga Times Free Press, their work has revealed an increase in truancy numbers and an inconsistent system of enforcement among school districts. The law school group is advocating for local programs that involve parents, alternative education programming, legal representation for every juvenile offender, and a greater focus among educators as to what causes students to miss school. They also are urging the state to recognize bullying, mental and chronic health issues, lack of transportation and homelessness as valid reasons for absences.

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Group Launches Effort to Reduce Minority Youth Arrests

The Annie E. Casey Foundation's Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative kicked off last week in Memphis. The organization is working with local officials to find ways to reduce the high rate of minority youths arrested and jailed each year. The initiative's management team has completed an assessment analyzing jail data and talking with those who work with troubled youth, including judges, jail and probation staff, law enforcement and school staff. It now will seek to repair what it says is a disconnect between police, school staff and court officials. ABC24.com reports

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Rutherford Juvenile Center Gets Federal Grant

The Rutherford County Juvenile Detention Center has received a $131,000 federal grant to enhance educational programming, career counseling, drug and alcohol prevention and parenting classes. "We are so excited to be approved for this grant," Juvenile Judge Donna Scott Davenport told the Murfreesboro Post. Officials said the center plans to use the money to purchase technological equipment and software, establish a new library and implement a new life management curriculum.

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Children's Justice Conference Held in Nashville

Over 700 child abuse professionals gathered in Nashville over the last few days to shed light on child abuse, News Channel 5 reports. The Connecting for Children's Justice Conference, held by the Tennessee Chapter of Children's Advocacy Centers, provided professionals a chance to receive training, support and leadership opportunities. Tennessee First Lady Crissy Haslam also spoke at the event. Learn more about the conference

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CASA Nashville Hires New Development Director

CASA Nashville has hired Patience Long, former manager of development for a large Illinois hospital chain, as its new development director. As manager of major gifts and the annual fund for Advocate BroMenn Medical Center, Long orchestrated a $10 million capital campaign, soliciting donations from individuals and corporations. She also previously was director of fundraising and special events for Gilda’s Club, a nonprofit cancer support group. Learn more about Tennessee CASA and its Nashville program here.

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Lawyer Who Morphed Images as Exhibit in Child Porn Trial Must Pay Damages

The 6th Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld a $300,000 award against an Ohio lawyer, rejecting arguments that he had a First Amendment right to morph stock photos into child pornography as part of a defense trial exhibit and that no one was harmed by his doing so, the ABA Journal reports. Dean Boland was trying to show that overbroad laws against child pornography could entrap a defendant who didn't know whether the images were real or fake. But he wound up in trouble himself.

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Suspension Lifted for Texas Judge Filmed Beating Daughter

The Texas Supreme Court has lifted the suspension of Aransas County Court-at-Law Judge William Adams, who was shown on video beating his then-16-year-old daughter with a belt for illegally downloading music. Adam’s older daughter uploaded the video to Youtube last year, but since the video was from 2004, the Aransas County district attorney said too much time has passed to bring criminal charges. News Channel 9 has the story.

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Assistant DA Retires After 26 years

Sumner County Assistant District Attorney (DA) Sallie Wade Brown retired last week after 26 years of service to the state. She spent the majority of her career prosecuting defendants charged with abusing children and most recently handled drug-related cases. Her daughter will continue her legacy, and was sworn in Thursday as the county’s newest district attorney. Read more at the Tennessean.

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New Davidson County Juvenile Judge to Be Sworn in Next Week

The newest Davidson County Juvenile Court judge, Sophia Brown Crawford, will be sworn in at 4:30 p.m. Nov. 14 at the Juvenile Justice Center on Woodland Street in Nashville. Crawford was appointed by the Metro Council on Oct. 16 to complete the term of Judge Betty Adams Green, who retired in September. Crawford was appointed to the bench as magistrate in 2002 by Green and has presided continuously since that time. Prior to her appointment, Craword spent 14 years in private practice with a focus on family and juvenile law. During that time, she was appointed as a contract attorney by the governor to prosecute termination of parental rights cases for the state Department of Children’s Services for 14 counties.

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Truancy Class Action Rejected

Two lawyers who sought to challenge Knox County’s handling of more than 140 truancy cases have been turned back in their attempt to create a class action for young people they say should not have been jailed for minor offenses such as truancy, smoking or running away from home. In rejecting the appeal, Fourth Circuit Judge Bill Swan said that it was an issue for the state legislature to decide. The News Sentinel reports.

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Haslam Appoints Siskin to 16th Circuit

Gov. Bill Haslam today appointed Keith Siskin to the 16th Judicial District Circuit Court, which serves Rutherford and Cannon counties. He fills the vacancy created by the appointment of Judge Don Ash to a senior judge position earlier this year. Siskin has been a juvenile court magistrate since 2004 and is a past president of the Rutherford and Cannon County Bar Association. The Daily News Journal has more.

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Crawford to Fill Nashville Juvenile Court Post

The Nashville Metro Council Tuesday night chose Sophia Crawford to fill the Juvenile Court judicial post vacated by Judge Betty Adams Green. Crawford, who currently serves as a Judicial Court magistrate, initially received 18 votes, beating magistrates Carlton Lewis and Sheila Calloway, who received 11 and nine votes respectively. In a run-off, Crawford defeated Lewis by a vote of 25 to 13, the City Paper reports.

NBA Releases Juvenile Judge Candidates Poll

The Nashville Bar Association (NBA) has released results of a member poll of candidates for the juvenile court judgeship vacated by Judge Betty Adams Green. Lawyers were asked to comment on three candidates: Sheila Calloway, Sophia Crawford and Carlton Lewis. Calloway received the greatest percentage of “highly recommend” votes (32.1 percent), followed by 28.6 for Lewis and 22.3 for Crawford. Download the survey results

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Report: Jail Must Improve Suicide Prevention Measures

Memphis' juvenile jail needs to take both immediate and long-term steps to better prevent detained youths from harming or killing themselves, according to a new national assessment. The report, authored by jail suicide prevention consultant Lindsay Hayes, is part of an ongoing overhaul of the Shelby County Juvenile Court and its detention center following the U.S. Justice Department's finding of due-process and safety violations. The jail has not had a suicide in almost 40 years, but the evaluation states that the court needs to improve suicide prevent training for staff and in-jail school teachers. The Commercial Appeal has more

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Tennessee CASA Honors Legislators

The Tennessee Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Association recently held its annual meeting in Nashville and recognized several state legislators for supporting its mission. Sen. Randy McNally, R-Oak Ridge, was given the association’s first ever President’s Award, which honors an individual who makes a significant contribution to the growth and success of CASA in Tennessee. Sen. Douglas Henry, D-Nashville, another strong supporter of CASA, accepted the award on behalf of McNally, who unable to attend. Other honorees included Sen. Doug Overbey, R-Maryville, and Rep. Mark White, R-Memphis, who were presented with Legislator of the Year Awards. They were chosen for their work helping colleagues understand barriers faced by older youth transitioning from foster care to independent living, and their efforts to pass the Transitioning Youth Act. Read more from CASA.

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Deberry Defends DCS Commissioner

Tennessee state Rep. John Deberry, D-Memphis, is defending Department of Children’s Service (DCS) Commissioner Kate O’Day from the critical media scrutiny she has been under since the agency released a report showing 31 children died during the first six months of 2012. Although Gov. Bill Haslam reviewed the report and said he found no evidence that DCS acted inappropriately, the Memphis Daily News reports that critics are calling for O’Day to be replaced. Deberry, who has criticized DCS over the years, stated in a letter, "In my opinion, Commissioner O'Day should be given a reasonable amount of time to assimilate a plan of action that will combat these ongoing issues involving the children of Tennessee.”

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