News

AOC Director Speaks to Leadership Nashville

Deborah Taylor Tate, director of the Administrative Office of the Courts, recently spoke to Leadership Nashville’s 2016 class at the First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt University. Tate, a graduate of the program, shared insights from her own government service as well as the work of the Tennessee court system, including access to justice efforts and new innovations such as recovery courts, a human trafficking court and a "toddler court" designed to reduce child fatalities. 

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Court Tackles Vehicular Homicides, Malpractice, Liquor Store Fees

The Tennessee Supreme Court has agreed to hear four East Tennessee cases, including a Claiborne County vehicular homicide case in which a lower appellate court set the admittedly guilty driver free. Another vehicular homicide case looks at whether a police officer should have sought a warrant before seeking a hospital blood draw from the defendant. The third case looks at whether a legal malpractice claim should have been dismissed for being filed too long after the alleged wrongdoing. And the fourth case explores whether the city of Morristown overcharged liquor stores with fees totaling a half-million dollars. Knoxnews reviews each case.

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AOC Names New Communications Director

The Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC) announced today that Jill G. Frost has joined its office as director of communications. Frost, a licensed Tennessee attorney, also has public relations and communications experience, including stints with the American Red Cross and the Governor’s Books from Birth Foundation. Frost earned her law degree from Belmont University College of Law. She replaces Michele Wojciechowski, who recently was named director of communications for the Nashville School of Law.

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Tennessee Attorneys Admitted to Practice Before Supreme Court at TBA Academy

A group of attorneys from across Tennessee were sworn in to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court today as part of the 33rd Annual TBA Academy. Along with the admissions ceremony, the attorneys took part in other networking and educational activities at the Supreme Court and on Capitol Hill. One highlight of this year's event was when TBA President Jason Long made the motion for admission of his wife, Carol Anne Long.

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Justices Appear Sympathetic to Intellectual Disability Issues

A majority of U.S. Supreme Court justices on Tuesday appeared ready to side with a man sentenced to death for a 1980 Houston murder who is challenging how Texas gauges whether a defendant has intellectual disabilities that would preclude execution, Reuters reports. The court ruled in 2002 that execution of the intellectually disabled violates the U.S. Constitution’s ban on cruel and unusual punishment. At issue in this case is whether Texas is using an obsolete standard to assess whether the defendant is intellectually disabled.

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Justices Rule against Politician in Bribery Case

The U.S. Supreme Court today issued its first ruling of the October term, deciding unanimously against a Puerto Rican politician who had sought to avoid a second trial on corruption charges after his original conviction was tossed out. The decision was a setback to Hector Martinez Maldonado, who served in Puerto Rico’s Senate from 2005 until his 2011 conviction, as well as businessman Juan Bravo Fernandez, the former president of a private security company. Prosecutors have argued that Fernandez sought to bribe Maldonado to win passage of legislation that would benefit his business. Reuters has more on the case.

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Judge Garland Heading Back to Old Job

Judge Merrick Garland will soon put on his black judicial robe for the first time in months as he goes back to his old job as chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Garland now joins a small group of people nominated but not confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court, the Associated Press reports. Garland stopped hearing cases after being nominated by President Obama in March to replace Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in February. The Paris Post-Intelligencer has the story.

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Court: School Zone Law Does Not Apply to Facilitating Sale of Drugs

The Tennessee Supreme Court ruled today that the Drug-Free School Zone Act does not apply when a defendant is convicted of “facilitation of possession” in a school zone, overturning both the trial court and appellate court decisions in the case of Stanley Bernard Gibson, who had received a sentencing enhancement based on the proximity of his crime to a school. In a unanimous opinion, the court found that the state drug-free school zone law specifically lists the offenses to which it applies, and facilitation is not among them. They affirmed the underlying conviction but remanded the case to the trial court for resentencing.

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Newsom Named Special Counsel in AG’s Memphis Office

Attorney General Herbert H. Slatery III has named James R. Newsom III as special counsel and lead attorney in the attorney general’s Memphis regional office. In his new role, Newsom will assist on a broad range of cases. Newsom previously served as chancellor in the 30th Judicial District, special master for the Chancery Court and in private practice for more than 30 years with Harris, Shelton, Hanover Walsh and its predecessor firm, Hanover, Walsh, Jalenak & Blair. He was appointed to the bench in 2015 by Gov. Bill Haslam. A native of Memphis, Newsom received his bachelor’s degree from Rhodes College in 1976 and law degree from Vanderbilt Law School in 1979.

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Lipscomb Renames Institute to Honor Fred Gray

Lipscomb University celebrated the renaming of its Institute for Law, Justice & Society in honor of civil rights attorney Fred Gray at a gala dinner Saturday in Nashville. Gray argued and won landmark civil rights cases before the U.S. Supreme Court four times before he was 30 and represented clients like Rosa Parks, Claudette Colvin, John Lewis, Martin Luther King Jr. and the victims of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. Among those reflecting on Gray's legacy at the event were Tennessee Court of Appeals Judge Richard Dinkins, Supreme Court Justice Cornelia Clark, Meharry Medical College President James E.K. Hildreth and U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper, D-Nashville. See photos from the event.

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Is Justice Kennedy About to Retire?

Those who suggest that U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy may be getting ready to retire point to several recent developments: Kennedy has scheduled his next clerkship reunion for 2017, one year shy of the five-year cycle he typically has followed; he did not teach abroad this summer, suggesting he may be winding down his schedule; and he has hired just one law clerk for the 2017 term. But the court’s spokeswoman says Kennedy is in the process of hiring more clerks and has plans to return to Salzburg in 2017. As for the timing of the reunion, he wanted to hold it the year he turned 80, she says. The ABA Journal has the story.

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Trump’s Supreme Court List Reflects ‘Revolt against Elites’

When Donald J. Trump issued his list of 21 potential nominees to the Supreme Court in September, he made a vow. “This list is definitive,” he said, “and I will choose only from it in picking future justices of the Supreme Court.” According to the New York Times, the list manages “to reassure the conservative legal establishment and to represent a rebellion against it.” But the major theme, the paper argues, is that Trump’s picks primarily went to law schools other than Harvard or Yale and reside in the country’s heartland rather than the coasts. The list, like his campaign, is a “revolt against the elites,” the paper concludes.

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Did Appeals Court Call for Reconsideration of Cowan Rule?

Since the Tennessee Supreme Court found that a final will cannot be contested by an individual who was left out of a previous will, the so called 1906 “Cowan Rule” has been creating heartburn for judges, the Times Free Press reports. The most recent test came in the case of J. Don Brock. At the trial court level, the judge “reluctantly dismissed” the claims of Brock’s children because they were cut out of a previous version. The appeals court upheld the decision but in a rare move, may have encouraged the state Supreme Court to re-examine the ruling and its practical application. Attorneys for the estate, however, say the appeals court did not ask for reconsideration but merely pointed out that the rule could be used to hide fraud. Read it here.

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Court Issues Order Amending TCCA Rule 7

The Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals issued an order today amending Rule 7 of its rules. The order deletes Rule 7 in its entirety and substitutes the following language: “Motions in this Court shall be in conformity with Rule 22, Tennessee Rules of Appellate Procedure. The proponent of a motion is not required to submit a proposed order.” Get the order here.

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AG's Office Clarifies Testimony to 6th Circuit Court of Appeals

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert H. Slatery III released a statement about a letter his office sent to the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in the matter of Andrew Thomas v. Bruce Westbrooks, a death penalty case. The letter from Assistant Attorney General Michael M. Stall seeks to clarify his testimony before the court this month about a $750 payment made to a witness in a federal case involving Andrew Thomas, which occured three years prior to the state case. The letter and today's statement emphasizes that “the payment … was made by the federal government without the knowledge of or involvement by District Attorney General Amy Weirich” and “there has been no finding whatsoever that state prosecutors in this case had actual knowledge of the payment at the time of the state trial.” Read the letter or this explanation from the AG's office.

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Courts Decline to Pre-emptively Act on Intimidation Claims

The U.S. Supreme Court and federal judges in three states turned down requests yesterday by Democrats trying to head off what they say were plans by Donald Trump’s supporters and a group known as Stop the Steal to harass and intimidate voters on Election Day. The Supreme Court issued a one-page denial in a case out of Ohio, while federal courts in Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Nevada also refused to act. Most of the judges said voter intimidation is already illegal and that the group did not present evidence of actual intimidation. They however pledged to monitor the day's activities closely. WRCB-TV has more from the Associated Press.

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Court: Videos Do Not Meet Statutory Standard for Exploitation Conviction

The Tennessee Supreme Court today reversed and dismissed the conviction of a Knoxville-area man for “especially aggravated sexual exploitation of a minor” saying the videos he took of his 12-year-old daughter showed nudity but not sexual activity, both of which are needed to meet the requirements of the statute. The decision sends the exploitation convictions back to the lower court for a new trial on different charges with the justices suggesting the state might want to consider a charge of "attempt to commit especially aggravated sexual exploitation of a minor." The justices let other convictions related to the case stand. Read the decision

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Appeals Court Upholds City’s Right to Cut COLAs

The U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals yesterday affirmed a district court ruling dismissing a lawsuit filed against the city of Chattanooga by retired firefighters and police officers over reforms to their pension plans, the Times Free Press reports. U.S. District Court Judge Curtis Collier had granted the city’s motion for summary judgment agreeing that cost-of-living adjustments did not constitute a vested right or contract between the city and its employees. The appellate panel found that, “The retirees do not have a contractual right to a fixed three-percent COLA, because the City Code does not bind the fund to the fixed COLA.”

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Court’s First Live Webcast Honors Scalia

The U.S. Supreme Court today live-streamed a memorial honoring the late Justice Antonin Scalia. It was the court’s first-ever live video webcast, the ABA Journal reports. Former Scalia law clerk Paul Cappucio, executive vice president and general counsel of Time Warner, led the event. Gabe Roth with Fix the Court, which has called for greater court transparency, said the decision to webcast the event was “a shock, though a much appreciated one.” A replay is available on the court’s website.

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Court OKs Good-Faith Exception to Exclusionary Rule

The Tennessee Supreme Court today by a vote of 4-1 approved a limited good-faith exception to the exclusionary rule only when law enforcement acts in objectively reasonable good-faith reliance on “binding appellate precedent” that “specifically authorizes a particular police practice” that is later overruled. The decision came in a vehicle accident case from October 2011 in which law enforcement obtained a blood sample from the driver without a warrant because the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled that warrants were not required to obtain blood from DUI suspects. That decision was later overruled. Justice Sharon G. Lee was the lone dissent.

TBA Board Member and Franklin criminal defense lawyer David Veile said, “It would seem that the citizen, and not the police, will now literally be penalized for previous appellate judge error. The court cited with approval authority indicating that law enforcement officers are the vanguard of our legal system. As a former police officer, I would respectfully submit that the Tennessee Constitution, and its checks and balances on the prosecution of its citizens, should be the vanguard of our legal system.”

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All Charges against Judge Sammons Dismissed

Senior Judge Paul Summers today threw out all charges against Campbell County General Sessions Court Judge Amanda Sammons, who was in court this week for a trial on two counts of official misconduct. After a day of testimony, Summers ruled that the state had failed to present enough proof of official misconduct for the jury to consider the case, Knoxnews reports. Special prosecutor Dan Armstrong said he will consult with the state attorney general’s office about an appeal of today’s decision as well as an earlier ruling by Summers in which he dismissed two unrelated charges. The Board of Judicial Conduct also said today it would lift its suspension of Sammons, clearing the way for her return to the bench.

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Court to Hear Transgender Bathroom Appeal

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed today to take up the case of Gavin Grimm, a transgender boy who challenged a Virginia school district policy that prevented him from using the boys’ restroom at his high school. The case will test the Obama administration’s directive that schools must let transgender students use bathrooms that align with their gender identity, the Washington Post reports. In August, the justices put on hold a lower court ruling that had sided with Grimm, while they decided whether to hear the case. The stay will remain in effect until the court rules on the merits.

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Democrats Blast Calls to Block Clinton Court Picks

Three U.S. senators have mentioned the possibility of blocking any Supreme Court candidate nominated by Hillary Clinton if she were to become president. The comments from Sens. John McCain, R-Arizona, Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Mike Lee, R-Utah, have angered the White House and Senate Democrats, Roll Call reports. Senate Judiciary ranking Democrat Patrick J. Leahy of Vermont said such a move would amount to a “piecemeal evisceration of the Constitution.” White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said such calls threaten “the same kind of dysfunction that has infected Washington for the last six years.”

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6th Circuit to Hold Session at Memphis Law

The U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals will hold oral arguments in the historic courtroom at the University of Memphis School of Law Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. The panel, consisting of Senior Judge Gilbert S. Merritt, Senior Judge Eugene E. Siler Jr. and Memphis Law alumna Judge Bernice B. Donald, will hear arguments in the death penalty case of Andrew Thomas Jr. v. Bruce Westbrooks. Following oral arguments, attorneys in the case will conduct a post-argument debriefing and the judges have agreed to stay for a reception in the school’s Scenic Reading Room.

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NSL Names New Communications Director

The Nashville School of Law has hired alumna Michele Wojciechowski as its first director of communications and engagement. She will start her new post on Nov. 1. Wojciechowski has served as the communications director for the Tennessee judiciary since 2012. At the Administrative Office of the Courts she was responsible for the communications and outreach efforts of the state appellate and trial courts, including the Supreme Court. Prior to joining the AOC, she spent more than 20 years in a variety of newspaper industry roles. Wojciechowski earned her law degree from the school in 2012.

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