TBA Announces 2008 Law Day Contest Winners

Annual contest challenges students to explore concept of 'rule of law'

NASHVILLE, May 29, 2008 -- Justin Carrasco, a fifth-grade student at Cedar Bluff Elementary of Knoxville, has won first place in a Law Day Art Contest sponsored by the Tennessee Bar Association. It was his second year to take the top award. In the TBA's essay contest, Monte Cole Flowers, a senior at Memphis Catholic High School, won first place.

Each year, the Tennessee Bar Association Young Lawyers Division holds a statewide art and essay contest in conjunction with Law Day - a national day set aside to celebrate the rule of law. Established by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1958, Law Day provides an opportunity for young people to learn about the law and the American judicial system and an opportunity for lawyers to serve their communities. 
 
The theme of this year's contest was "The Rule of Law: Foundation for Communities of Opportunity and Equity." The theme focused on the law's effect on daily life, helping young people understand that the rule of law is essential for personal safety, access to education and employment, and economic opportunity.
 
In the art contest, open to elementary and middle school students, fourth-grader Ryan Elmerick of Nashville's Julia Green Elementary School won second place, while Jessie Robertson, a second-grader at Memphis' Grahamwood Elementary School, won third place. 
 
In an essay contest for high school students, Makeshia Welch, a senior at Martin Luther King Jr. Magnet High School in Nashville, won second place, while eleventh-grader Shelton Campbell of Gallatin, a student at Hendersonville Christian Academy, took third.
 
Students placing in the top three in each contest received cash prizes for their winning entries. In addition, their work will be displayed at the TBA's annual convention in Gatlinburg June 11-14. See entries from all winners here
 

The Tennessee Bar Association (TBA) is the largest professional association in Tennessee with more than 13,000 members. Founded in 1881, the TBA provides opportunities for continuing legal education, professional development and public service. The TBA’s dedication to serving the state’s legal community is evidenced by its membership roll, which represents the entire spectrum of legal practice: plaintiff and defense lawyers, corporate counsel, judges, prosecutors, public defenders, government lawyers and legal services attorneys.