TBA Announces Law Day Contest Winners

2011 contest challenges students to explore legacy of John Adams

NASHVILLE, June 1, 2011 — Knoxville fifth-grader Kylie Mackenzie Bowman of Cedar Bluff Elementary has won first place in a Law Day Art Contest sponsored by the Tennessee Bar Association, while Ashton Banta, a senior at Red Bank High School in Chattanooga, took first place in the TBA's essay contest.

Each year, the Tennessee Bar Association Young Lawyers Division holds a statewide art and essay contest in conjunction with Law Day -- a national day set aside on May 1 to celebrate the rule of law. Established by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1958, Law Day provides an opportunity for young people to learn about the law and the American judicial system and an opportunity for lawyers to serve their communities. The theme of this year's contest was "The Legacy of John Adams: From Boston to Guantanamo," which asked students to consider the role Adams played in American history, and explore the historical and contemporary role of lawyers in defending the rights of the accused -- even those who are unpopular.

In the art contest, second place went to John Gannaway of Decatur, who is an eighth grader at Meigs Middle School, and third place went to Caroline Melancon, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Germantown. Ryan Bauer, a sixth grade student at St. Rose Catholic School in Murfreesboro, was awarded an honorable mention.

Second place in the essay contest went to Victoria Rochelle Nelson of Knoxville, a 10th grader at Bearden High School. Third place went to Oleksandr Oliynyk, an 11th grade student at Northwest High School in Clarksville. Anna Abbot, an 11th grade student at Nashville Christian School in Nashville, was awarded an honorable mention.

Students placing in the top three slots will receive cash prizes for their entries and have their work displayed at the TBA's annual convention in Chattanooga, June 15-18. Winning entries also can be viewed online


The Tennessee Bar Association (TBA) is the largest professional association in Tennessee with more than 13,000 members. Founded in 1881, the TBA provides opportunities for continuing legal education, professional development and public service. The TBA’s dedication to serving the state’s legal community is evidenced by its membership roll, which represents the entire spectrum of legal practice: plaintiff and defense lawyers, corporate counsel, judges, prosecutors, public defenders, government lawyers and legal services attorneys.