TBA Law Blog


57 Posts found
Page 1 of 6 • Next

Posted by: Katharine Heriges on Sep 29, 2017

The Trial Court Vacancy Commission met today to consider five candidates for Circuit Court vacancy in the 17th Judicial District, representing Bedford, Lincoln, Marshall and Moore Counties. The vacancy was created when Judge Lee Russell announced he will retire effective Nov. 30. After holding a public hearing and conducting public interviews, the commission selected the following nominees: Marshall W. Burk of Shelbyville, Trisha L. Henegar of Shelbyville and John H. Richardson, Jr. of Fayetteville. The commission has forwarded the names to Governor Bill Haslam for his consideration.

Posted by: Katharine Heriges on Sep 27, 2017

Governor Bill Haslam today named David M. Rudolph as Circuit Court Judge for the 30th Judicial District, which serves Shelby County. The vacancy was created by the retirement of Judge Robert L. Childers on June 30. Rudolph, 54, has been at the Memphis law firm Bourland, Heflin, Alvarez, Minor and Matthews since 2009, where he practiced in the areas of complex commercial litigation, tort litigation and employment law. He is a Vanderbilt Law graduate who has also served on the board of directors for the Tennessee Employment Lawyers Association since 2014.

Posted by: Kate Prince on Sep 18, 2017

The Trial Court Vacancy Commission met Friday to consider seven applicants for the Circuit Court vacancy in the 16th Judicial District, serving Rutherford and Cannon Counties. The vacancy was created by the death of Judge M. Keith Siskin. Following a public hearing and public interviews, the commission selected Ben E. Bennett of Milton, Aaron J. Conklin of Murfreesboro, and Barry R. Tidwell of Murfreesboro. The three names now go to Gov. Bill Haslam for consideration.

Posted by: Katharine Heriges on Sep 8, 2017

The Nashville Bar Association conducted a poll to ask which of the seven applicants for 20th Judicial District Criminal Court Judge its members preferred. Out of 605 responses, the favorite candidate was Angelita Blackshear Dalton, with 33 percent responding that they would “highly recommend” her. Tyler Chance Yarbro and Cynthia C. Chappell were the two next most popular choices. 

Posted by: Katharine Heriges on Aug 24, 2017

The Trial Court Vacancy Commission today considered eight applicants for the Circuit Court vacancy in the 4th Judicial District, serving Cocke, Grainger, Jefferson and Sevier Counties. The vacancy was created by the retirement of Judge Ben W. Hooper II. After hearings and interviews, the commission selected Jeremy Dane Ball of Dandridge, Carter Scott Moore of Cosby and Melissa Moore of Sevierville. The three now go to Gov. Bill Haslam for consideration.

Posted by: Stacey Shrader Joslin on Aug 8, 2016

The Trial Court Vacancy Commission today selected Lee Ann Pafford Dobson of Collierville, David M. Rudolph of Memphis and Mary L. Wagner of Memphis as finalists to fill a vacancy on the 30th Judicial District Circuit Court. The panel interviewed 11 candidates before choosing the three to send to Gov. Bill Haslam. The AOC website has more on the candidates.

Posted by: Amelia Ferrell Knisely on Dec 4, 2015

The Tennessee District Attorneys General Conference (TDAGC) will no longer contract with outside attorneys to handle cases when a local prosecutor has a conflict – a practice that led to a criminal investigation of Nashville prosecutor Glenn Funk. The Tennessean reports Executive Director Jerry Estes said the change was made before he started in the role July 1. "The practice of retaining attorneys outside the conference had pretty much stopped," Estes said. "Usually it had been someone who was a retired (district attorney) or somebody who was an elected (district attorney) like General Funk was." Funk will not face criminal prosecution related to his employment at the TDAGC.

Posted by: Amelia Ferrell Knisely on Oct 29, 2015

A panel at the Center for American Progress discussed the group’s new report “More Money, More Problems: Fleeting Victories for Diversity on the Bench" on Monday in Washington, D.C. The report advocates reforms that could help foster diversity on the bench, such as public financing for judicial campaigns. You can listen to the panel discussion online.

Posted by: Allan Ramsaur on Apr 21, 2015

It appears that the legislation on judicial selection will once again get "the last dance, last chance for love" in the words of the Donna Summer song. Action on the principal surviving bill at this point, HB0142,/SB0001, was deferred until Wednesday, which could be the last day or next to the last day of this annual legislative session. The bill contains provisions establishing a new trial court vacancy commission which, much like the judicial selection and nominating commissions before, would submit three names to the governor to fill vacancies on the trial bench. The bill also implements the new constitutional provision establishing gubernatorial nomination, confirmation and retention of appellate judges. Discussions continue on details of how the two bodies of the General Assembly can express themselves on confirmation. Legislative action on selection of judges has been decided in the last week of session for almost a decade.

Posted by: Stacey Shrader Joslin on Feb 23, 2015

A Kansas State House committee has approved two proposals to end the merit-based selection of Supreme Court justices. One proposal would institute contested, partisan elections for the court, while the other would give the governor unilateral appointment authority, subject to confirmation by the state Senate, according to the Associated Press. Gavel to Gavel reports on the move and raises question about whether either proposal could capture the two-thirds vote needed for House passage. Similar efforts in 2013 were blocked by that requirement, it notes.


Page 1 of 6 • Next