Government Affairs Update

Follow the TBA's efforts to influence federal and state policy as it fulfills one of the core missions of the association – advocacy for the profession and for our system of justice.

GOP Arrives at Difficult Budget Accord

Republican legislative leaders on Friday night mended a rift that had emerged between House and Senate lawmakers over local “pork barrel spending.” They agreed on about $1 million worth of additional reductions in a rarely called budget “conference committee."  TNReport has more

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House Panel Votes Down 'Guns in Trunks' Bill

A House committee voted Tuesday to kill a guns measure that has pitted firearms advocates against business groups. The bill, backed by the National Rifle Association, allows anyone with a handgun carry permit to store loaded guns in vehicles parked on company lots — regardless of employers' wishes. The committee voted 15-8 to send the measure to a summer study committee. Advocates of the bill, however, are pushing for a floor vote despite the move. The Tennessean has details

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Haslam's Budget Moving to Senate Floor

Gov. Bill Haslam's $31 billion spending proposal was approved unanimously by the Senate Finance Committee last night and was scheduled for a floor vote today. The plan seeks to phase out Tennessee's inheritance tax and lower the state's sales tax on groceries. The proposal also calls for raises for state employees and more spending on construction on college campuses. Read more in The Memphis Daily News

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House Passes 'Loser Pays' Bill

After more than two hours of debate, the Tennessee House voted 58-38 yesterday for a "loser pays" system that allows judges to assess fees of up to $10,000 on plaintiffs who bring suits determined to have "no basis in fact or law." Opponents contend the bill, HB 3124, will intimidate average citizens from going to court against big corporations. Several amendments were offered and defeated, including one that would have required defendants to pay plaintiff’s costs if their motions to dismiss are denied. The measure now goes to the Senate, where it was expected to be considered today. The News Sentinel has more

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Henry Returns to Legislature

State Sen. Douglas Henry, D-Nashville, returned to the legislature today and attended Senate Finance Committee proceedings. The 85-year-old lawmaker was taken to Vanderbilt University Medical Center on Tuesday for tests after he experienced high blood pressure and felt dizzy in a caucus meeting. The Memphis Daily News reported the update

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Sen. Henry Hospitalized

State Sen. Douglas Henry, 85, was hospitalized today after experiencing dizziness brought on by high blood pressure. He was checked into Vanderbilt Hospital shortly after this afternoon’s session ended. Henry was alert and able to move about on his own, a spokesman said. Henry’s condition will delay when the budget is taken up again in the Senate,  Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, R-Collierville, said. Henry, a Nashville Democrat, is the vice chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, which is currently reviewing the budget. The Tennessean has more

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Bill to Change Attorney General Selection Fails

A proposal to change the way the state attorney general is selected failed 16-15 in the Senate. Under the proposal, the governor would have appointed an attorney general and the legislature would have confirmed the selection. Currently, attorneys general are selected by state Supreme Court justices. Read the AP story

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Conservatorship Bill Passes House, Goes to Governor

The state House voted unanimously Monday for a bill designed to protect citizens targeted to have their lives placed under the control of conservators. In brief discussion before the 95-0 vote, Rep. Gary Odom, D-Nashville, said the bill would require those petitioning to place someone in a conservatorship to disclose their relationship to the target of the petition and to disclose whether they had a criminal record. The bill already has passed the Senate and is expected to go to the governor later this week. Read more in the Tennessean

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Amendment Moving Forward Would End Merit Selection

In this final week of the 107th General Assembly, the legislature appears poised to pass a resolution to amend the state constitution to introduce a modified federal style of appointments to fill appellate and Supreme Court vacancies. SJR 710, by Sen. Brian Kelsey, R-Collierville, eliminates current language in the Constitution that contemplates elections, and replaces it with a process by which the governor will appoint a judge, subject to the confirmation by both houses of the General Assembly. Once in office, the judge would stand for a retention election. This change would end the current merit selection/retention election process in Tennessee

The resolution passed in the Senate on Monday and is set for consideration tomorrow in the House. If passed, the resolution would be before the 108th General Assembly, where it would require a two-thirds vote, in order to go on the ballot for public consideration in November 2014.

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Eligible to Run? Candidate's Property Straddles District Line

A woman who has filed to run to run as a Democrat for the new 89th District state House seat lives in a house that seems to be in Anderson County, although her driveway and mailbox are in Knox. The 89th District lies entirely in Knox County. On Monday, Knox County Law Director Joe Jarret asked Chancellor John Weaver for a declaratory judgment. State Election Coordinator Mark Goins has said it appears to him that Shelley Breeding is an Anderson County resident, but that the election commission should seek a court ruling. Breeding is registered to vote in Knox County, her vehicle has Knox County tags, and she was recently summoned for jury duty in Knox County. The News Sentinel has more

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