Letters of the Law

Readers React to ‘We’re All Going to Die’

I really enjoyed Eddy Smith’s article about the magic age of 50 [“We’re All Going to Die (and Other Happy Thoughts of an Estate Planner Turning 50,” April 2016 Tenn. Bar Journal]. I recall that some time in the distant past I, too, turned 50. It can often be a time of reflection and self-assessment, but the most important thing is the achievement itself. I appreciate Eddy reminding us to take time to think about the road we have traveled, the help others have been along the way and the ways we can help our family, friends and clients as we continue the practice of law and life.

— Steve Davis, Pendleton Square Trust Company LLC, Nashville

Thanks to Ed Smith for his thought-provoking article, “We’re All Going to Die (and Other Happy Thoughts of an Estate Planner Turning 50),” in the April 2016 issue of Tennessee Bar Journal. As attorneys we pay careful attention to the requirements and technicalities of the law in advising our clients and in managing our own affairs. Ed’s article is a great reminder that we should look at the broader picture and surrounding circumstances to be better advisors and to make better personal decisions.  While it may not be comfortable for us and our clients to contemplate our mortality, doing so and planning in advance helps us lead better lives and makes matters easier for us and our families when difficult circumstances occur.  I commend Ed for sharing his experiences, thoughts, and recommendations. I and others will benefit from considering the questions he poses.

— Marcia M. McMurray, Cleveland

I’ve never written a “fan letter” like this before for a TBA article, but I just wanted to let you know that [Ed Smith’s] article was fantastic. Thanks for addressing this topic (the inevitability of death and the problems associated with the denial thereof) with humor and clarity!

— Neesha N. Shah, Kingsport

Scalia: ‘One of the Best Legal Minds’

[In reference to TBA President Bill Harbison’s March column] I was just wondering if someone could have been selected to write the “Remembering Justice Scalia” article who actually admired his legal scholarship? Scalia was generally considered one of the best legal minds on the Court by friend and foe alike. Perhaps an article discussing his body of work and effect on American jurisprudence would have made for more interesting reading than Mr. Harbison’s views on “original intent” and judicial etiquette.

— Gary M. Howell, Columbia

Editor’s note: The Journal welcomes article submissions. Check out our writer’s guidelines at http://www.tba.org/submit-an-article

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