Licensure & Discipline

REINSTATED

Hamilton County attorney Katrina Akers Davis was reinstated to the practice of law effective Nov. 28, 2018. The Tennessee Supreme Court noted that Davis had been placed on inactive status in February 1996 but had filed a petition for reinstatement this past November. The Board of Professional Responsibility stated that the petition for reinstatement was satisfactory and met the requirements of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9. The court issued the order on Dec. 7, 2018.

Davidson County lawyer Allyn Rubright Gibson was reinstated to the practice of law effective Nov. 19, 2018. The Tennessee Supreme Court noted that Gibson had been placed on inactive status in October 2013 but had filed a petition for reinstatement this past November. The Board of Professional Responsibility stated that the petition for reinstatement was satisfactory and met the requirements of Tennessee Supreme Court Rule 9. The court issued the order on Dec. 3, 2018.

DISCIPLINARY

Disbarred
The Tennessee Supreme Court disbarred former Davidson County lawyer and judge Casey Eugene Moreland on Jan. 2. The court previously had suspended Moreland on June 5, 2018, based on his guilty plea to obstruction of an official proceeding, conspiracy to retaliate against a witness, conspiracy to commit theft, destruction of records, and tampering with a witness. In imposing the disbarment, the court determined that Moreland’s actions violated Rules of Professional Conduct 8.4(a) and (b). It also stipulated that the period of disbarment will be served consecutive to the incarceration. Moreland entered a conditional guilty plea to the disbarment. As a condition of reinstatement, Moreland must comply with any restitution ordered by the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee, complete all CLE requirements, pay all outstanding registration fees and professional privilege taxes, and pay all court costs in the matter.

The Tennessee Supreme Court disbarred Bradley County attorney Michael John McNulty from the practice of law on Dec. 5, 2018. The court also ordered him to pay restitution to one client in the amount of $1,125. In January 2018, a petition for discipline was filed against McNulty based on two complaints of ethical misconduct. In the first complaint, McNulty received $1,125 for legal work but provided minimal services and ultimately abandoned his client. In the second complaint, McNulty falsified an email communication related to a client matter when he sent an email purporting to be from an attorney who no longer worked at the firm. The court also noted that McNulty did not answer the petition for discipline or appear at the final hearing. His conduct was determined to violate Rules of Professional Conduct 1.3, 1.4, 1.5(a), 1.16(d), 4.1(a), 8.1(b) and 8.4(a) and (c). Finally, the court noted that a prior disbarment from Feb. 15, 2018, also remains in effect.

Suspended

The Tennessee Supreme Court suspended Knox County lawyer John Harley Fowler from the practice of law on Jan. 2 after finding that he failed to respond to complaints of misconduct and posed a threat of substantial harm to the public. Fowler was immediately precluded from accepting any new cases and was to cease representing existing clients by Feb. 1. The suspension remains in effect until dissolution or modification by the court.

The Supreme Court of Tennessee suspended Stephen Kenneth Perry of Evergreen Park, Illinois, on Jan. 2 after finding that he failed to respond to a complaint of misconduct. Perry was immediately precluded from accepting any new cases and was to cease representing existing clients by Feb. 1. The suspension remains in effect until dissolution or modification by the court.

The Supreme Court of Tennessee suspended Candace Lenette Williamson of Southaven, Mississippi, from the practice of law on Dec. 21, 2018, after finding that she failed to respond to a complaint of misconduct. Williamson was immediately precluded from accepting any new cases and was to cease representing existing clients by Jan. 20. The suspension remains in effect until dissolution or modification by the court.

Censured
The Tennessee Supreme Court censured Williamson County attorney Timothy Alan Tull on Jan. 2. In imposing a censure, the court set two conditions: that Tull make restitution to a client in the amount of $2,000 and that he utilize the services of a practice monitor for one year. The practice monitor is to meet with Tull at least once per month and by phone weekly, and provide written reports to the Board of Professional Responsibility. The court found that Tull failed to advise a client of potential conflicts of interest or of the desirability of seeking independent legal advice, and failed to provide the client an opportunity to seek independent legal advice. In addition, the court found that Tull failed to reasonably communicate with another client regarding resolution of a discovery motion and the imposition of sanctions against the client. Tull agreed to a conditional guilty plea in which he acknowledged his misconduct violated Tennessee Rules of Professional Conduct 1.4 and 1.8(a)(2).

Administrative Suspensions
Notice of attorneys suspended for, and reinstated from, administrative violations – including failure to pay the Board of Professional Responsibility licensing and inactive fees, file the required IOLTA report, comply with continuing legal education requirements, and pay the Tennessee professional privilege tax – is on the TBA website at www.tba.org/directory-listing/ administrative-suspension-lists.

 

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