News

HRC Medical Must Pay $18 Million for Consumer Protection Violations

A judge has ordered that HRC Medical Centers and the company’s principles must pay consumers who purchased HRC’s bio-identical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT), according to Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery’s office. Judge Don Ash granted the state’s motion for partial summary judgement in its suit against the company, which must now pay $18,141,750 for violations of the Tennessee Consumer Protection Act. Additionally, the Court issued a permanent injunction barring the Defendants from engaging in conduct the Court has found unlawful.
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Ten Tips for Better Trial Practice

Here are ten tips for better trial practice from Judge Dale Tipps.

Accident Investigation CLE

Get a working knowledge of the types and causes of accidents during this July 26 CLE webcast. Discussion includes the proper process of documenting vehicle accidents, construction accidents, environmental accidents and others. Find out more and register here.

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D.C. Pastors Sue Coca-Cola Over Health Concerns

Two Washington, D.C.-based pastors have filed suit against Coca-Cola and the American Beverage Association (ABA), claiming soda makers knowingly deceived customers about the health risks of their products, The Washington Post reports. The complaint, which was filed last week, alleges that Coke and the ABA ran an intentional campaign to confuse consumers about the causes of obesity. “We’re losing more people to sweets than to the streets,” said Pastor Delman Coates, one of the complainants.
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Item of Interest

Below is an article that was published in the the Disability Section Connect. We thought it had information that would be of interest to those of you in this section as well.  

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Man Sentenced in Mortgage Fraud Wants Conviction Tossed

A businessman sentenced in 2014 for a mortgage fraud scheme wants his conviction tossed out and a new trial, the Times Free Press reports. Attorney Michael Richardson argued in Chattanooga’s U.S. District Court that Joshua Dobson did not make an informed decision when he exercised his constitutional rights and took his case to trial in 2013. Richardson further explained that Dobson’s former attorney allowed his client to turn down a plea deal without properly explaining the amount of time Dobson faced in prison. Federal prosecutors, however, noted that the government never formally offered a deal to Dobson.
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Middle Tennessee U.S. Attorney Secures $2.7 Million False Claims Settlement

The acting U.S. attorney for the Middle District of Tennessee reached a settlement with Innovative Therapies and its parent company, Cardinal Health, in a $2.7 million False Claims Act case, the Nashville Post reports. The company was accused by a whistleblower of marketing and billing a product as “durable medical equipment,” even though the product did not meet standards for a durable device. The whistleblower in the case will receive $488,700 under the terms of the False Claims Act.
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Crash Victims’ Families File Suits Against Guardrail Companies

The families of three Tennesseans killed in a crash last year filed lawsuits today alleging negligence by guardrail companies, the Knoxville News Sentinel reports. Two of the wrongful death suits were filed in Cumberland County Circuit Court and a third was filed in Hamilton County against Valmont Industries, Lindsay Corporation and their subsidiaries. They are accused of failing to design a safe product and failure to disclose “known problems and defects.” The suits also allege improper installation by Cumberland Guardrail.
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Judge Lifts Blackout on Gatlinburg Wildfire Records

Government records on the handling of the Gatlinburg wildfire can now be released to the public by order of Judge Jeff Rader, the Knoxville News Sentinel reports. Records were kept under wraps for weeks, even after the ruling, which was prompted by the state attorney general’s request for clarification on what records the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency could release about the deadly blaze. The only details the judge barred from release are the names of the two teenage boys accused of starting the fire.
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Turn Your Expertise into a Magazine Article

It’s no surprise that some of the best articles in the Tennessee Bar Journal have come from TBA section and Young Lawyers Division members. Your membership in this group shows that you have a keen interest in trends, developments and case law in this practice area. Sharing this knowledge with your colleagues is one of the best traits of the profession. Readers want to learn what you know, from your unique perspective.

How can you become a Journal author? Think of and refine your topic. It should be of interest to Tennessee lawyers, which is a broad criteria. This could mean you might detail a new state law, explain a complicated area of law, or take a larger issue and connect it to what it means for Tennessee attorneys and the justice system. Find a global issue within your particular experience or knowledge and tell about it and how it affects Tennessee law. Then take a look at the writer’s guidelines at http://www.tba.org/submit-an-article, which will tell you about length, notes and other details.

The Journal is always looking for excellent articles, so send yours in!

And as a bonus, if you are published, you may apply for CLE credit for your work under Supreme Court Rule 21 Section 4.07(b). For details on claiming the credit, check with the Commission on CLE & Specialization at http://www.cletn.com/.

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TBA Convention in Kingsport is Just Around the Corner

Registration is open for the 2017 TBA Annual Convention. This years programming offers plenty of opportunities to make new friends and renew acquaintances with colleagues from across the state. The highlight comes Thursday night with the Kingsport Karnival at the downtown Farmers Market. Along with fabulous food and drink, there will be live music from two bands, an aerialist, juggler, magician, body and face painters, caricaturist and more. Plus, you'll have access to the fabulous Kingsport Carousel, the delightful project of community artisans. Special thanks to Eastman for support of this event! 

This years convention also offers 12 hours of CLE programming, highlighted by sessions on the Hatfields and McCoys, The Neuroscience of Decision-Making, and the popular Better Right Now wellness program. It is all set at the beautiful MeadowView Marriott Conference Resort & Convention Center. To receive the TBA $129 room rate, you must book your reservation by May 23. Book your room online now or call 423-578-6600.

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Call For Submissions — Law Practice Pointers

One of the benefits of being a TBA Section Member is having access to information from experienced practitioners to assist in your day-to-day practice. The sharing of this information amongst colleagues is one of the best traits of the profession. It is also a way of helping each other to maneuver the evolving legal market and strengthen your legal practice.

How can you help your fellow Section Members?  If you have some Law Practice Pointers you would like to share with your fellow section members, write an article between 300-500 words and submit it to the Section Coordinator for review and approval. These Law Practice Pointers can be related to a court opinion, piece of legislation, or current event or industry trend that affects the practice of law as it relates to the specific Section. The main requirement is to make sure the article gives lawyers practical tips, based on experience, to include in their day-to-day practice.

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Third-Party Litigation Trend Growing

Commercial third-party litigation financing has grown from an uncommon occurrence in the 90’s — estimated at maybe $100 million worth of funding — to a $4 billion industry with at least 30 dedicated funders in 2017, the Memphis Daily News reports. This type of litigation is seen by funders as a way to diversify their investments, but it has drawn criticism from some, who suggest the financing helps “unmeritorious cases" move ahead because it spreads risk across a broad portfolio of litigation. Memphis attorney Lucian Pera offered a counterpoint, noting “Nobody puts $1 million into a $10 million claim if they’re not convinced there’s some merit there.”
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Class Action Litigation Bill Passes Despite ABA Opposition

Despite the American Bar Association’s opposition, the U.S. House yesterday passed the Fairness in Class Action Litigation Act of 2017, the ABA Journal reports. The bill requires federal courts to deny class-action certification unless every one of the proposed class members affirmatively demonstrated they have “suffered the same type and scope of injury” as the named plaintiffs. This morning the House also passed the Lawsuit Abuse Reduction Act of 2017, which amends Rule 11 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure to require judges to sanction attorneys who file lawsuits deemed to have no merit. 
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Davidson County Chancery Court Launches E-Filing

Electronic case filing is now available in Davidson County Chancery Court. The court has implemented a program called Odyssey eFileTN, which allows users to open cases and file documents with the Davidson County Chancery Court from anywhere via a secure website. Davidson County is only the second county in Tennessee to implement e-filing in a state trial court. Learn more about the program, access rules or register for e-filing at the Odyssey eFileTN website.
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ABA Opposes Class-action Reform Legislation

The American Bar Association sent a letter to Congress this week in opposition to the Fairness in Class Action Litigation Act of 2017, the ABA Journal reports. Governmental Affairs Office Director Thomas M. Susman said the bill would “make it more difficult for large numbers of injured parties to efficiently seek redress in court; and place added burdens on an already overloaded court system.”
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From Fees to Dogs in Court, March TBJ Has It

In the March Tennessee Bar Journal, Tim Warnock explains last year's Supreme Court decision about assessing fee applications. Commissioner Robert Hibbett and Justin Hickerson give you the scoop on a "court" you may not even know the state has: the Tennessee Claims Commission. On its 190th anniversary, Russell Fowler looks back at how Chancery Court got started in Tennessee, and Wade Davies explains using the summary rule to advance your trial theory. Humor columnist Bill Haltom recalls a dog who presided over a courtroom, and considers taking his own dogs with him to try his next case.

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Suit Accuses Firm of Preying on Woodmore Family

A lawsuit filed today accuses law firms of taking advantage of victims of the Woodmore school bus crash, the Times Free Press reports. The suit was filed against Durham School Services, the private company responsible for the school system’s bus staffing, and includes claims of a Georgia law firm that illegally visited the father of one of the victims in jail and made empty promises.
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Nashville Judge Rules Against ‘Eyesore’ Scrap Metal Yard

A federal judge in Nashville ruled against the scrapyard PSC Metals in a dispute between the company and its landlord, the Nashville Post reports. The two parties disagreed over an appraisal of the property, with the landowners believing that the appraisal should take into account what the land could be worth if it was rezoned from industrial to mixed use. Mayor Megan Barry has called the scrapyard an “eyesore” and former mayors have attempted to redevelop the property in the past.
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TBA Mashup and Mini Legal Hackathon this Friday

In conjunction with the Law Tech UnConference CLE this Friday, the TBA is also offering a variety of free events and programs for lawyers we’re calling a Mashup. One program will teach you about Legal Hackathons and see one in action. A Legal Hackathon is a collaborative effort of experts in the legal profession collaborating with a computer programmer to find a technology assisted solution to a problem in the legal industry. Join the TBA Special Committee on the Evolving Legal Market for a mini legal hackathon that will demonstrate the power of collaborative minds at work. We will have tasty beverages and snacks to help you get your collaborative juices flowing.  
 
Other programs that will be a part of the Mashup include Pro Bono In Action which will show you various pro bono programs you can participate in to help your fellow Tennesseans and Member Benefit Programs that will provide you information on  Fastcase 7, health insurance options for small firms, ABA retirement funds and professional liability insurance.
 
Please sign up now to let us know you are coming.

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Harassment Suit Seeks $9.3 Million from Knox County

A Knox County woman is seeking $9.3 million in a suit filed today that claims her boss at the county procurement office sexually harassed her, Knoxnews reports. Janice Orr originally filed a formal harrassment complaint against her boss, Hugh Holt, in August of last year. After a series of interviews with county employees, the investigative body recommended Holt be terminated in October. Holt was then immediately hired by the Knox County Sheriff’s Department at a higher salary.
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Tennessee Supreme Court Rules in Teacher Tenure Case

The Tennessee Supreme Court yesterday ruled against Rogelynn Emory, a former tenured Memphis teacher who was fired in 2005, the Tennessean reports. The case centered on whether the Memphis City Schools Board of Education (now Shelby County Board of Education) had potentially violated the Tennessee Teacher Tenure Act by holding Emory’s appeal hearing more than 30 days after her suspension. The court’s ruling didn’t address whether the law requires, or merely recommends, that a termination hearing should be held within 30 days after termination proceedings begin. Rather, the court said that because Emory didn’t raise concerns about the timing during her hearing before the Memphis school board, she was barred from arguing it on appeal. 
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Federal Clean Water Lawsuit Against TVA Set for Pretrial Motions

The Nashville Scene has an in-depth cover story about the lawsuit against the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), which is set for pretrial motions next week in U.S. District Court. Judge Waverly Crenshaw will hear the suit, which centers around the Gallatin Fossil Plant, located on the banks of the Cumberland River, and the way TVA stores the facility’s toxic coal ash byproduct. Environmental groups are concerned about potential contamination to the Cumberland and the area surrounding the site.
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Have You Heard About the TBA Mashup?

Interested in observing a legal hackathon or getting a hands-on demonstration of the new Fastcase 7 platform? Both will be part of the first TBA Mashup, a full-day of activities and free programming set for Feb. 17 at the Tennessee Bar Center in conjunction with the annual TBA Law Tech UnConference CLE program.

In addition to the hackathon and Fastcase 7 demo, the TBA Mashup will feature sessions on: 

  • Current State of Health Insurance for the Small Firms
  • Professional Liability Insurance - What to look for in YOUR Policy
  • A Demo of Fastcase TopForm, a powerful bankruptcy filing software
  • Retirement Planning Guidance from the ABA Retirement Funds
  • Pro Bono in Action: How to help with pro bono events and how to take part in online options

At the annual TBA Law Tech UnConference CLE program, you can take as many or as few hours as you need. Registration will be open all day. Payment will be determined at checkout based on the hours you need. Topics will include: 

  • Bill & Phil Tech Show
  • Ethical Considerations for Cyber Security in Law
  • Evolution of the Legal Marketplace
  • Making e-Discovery Affordable 
  • Drone Law
  • Encryption for Lawyers

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Court Adopts 2017 Rules Package

The Tennessee Supreme Court today published the 2017 amendments to its rules of procedure and evidence. Proposals include changing the place for filing a notice of appeal to the appellate clerk’s office, requiring payment of fees and taxes to the appellate court clerk at the time of initiation of an appeal, and other changes to the rules of appellate procedure, civil procedure, criminal procedure and juvenile procedure, as well as the rules of evidence. Six TBA sections – Appellate Practice, Litigation, Tort and Insurance Law, Criminal Justice, Family Law, and Juvenile and Children’s Law reviewed the rules when proposed and either found no objections or supported the changes. The proposals now go to the legislature for ratification before becoming effective on July 1.

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