Property

TBA Intellectual Property Section to Host Lunch at Annual Forum on April 27

The TBA Intellectual Property Section will host a networking lunch at its annual forum in Nashville on April 27. All Intellectual Property Section members can attend the networking lunch; forum attendance is not required. Please contact Jarod Word with any questions and to register for this event. We hope to see you there!

When: 11:45 p.m. – 12:15 p.m., CDT

Where: Tennessee Bar Center, 221 Fourth Ave N., Nashville, TN 37219

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Earl 'Peanutt' Montgomery sues George Jones' Widow, Record Label for $5 Million

A frequent George Jones collaborator is suing the late country icon's widow, Concord Music Group and Cracker Barrel for releasing a long-shelved album without permission, reports The Tennessean. Earl "Peanutt" Montgomery co-wrote 73 songs cut by Jones, nearly 40 of which were released as singles by the late entertainer. Montgomery also played in Jones’ band and produced music for the late entertainer.

Montgomery claims that in the late 1970s, Jones contacted him about an idea to collaborate with Roy Acuff's Smoky Mountain Boys on an album. Jones wanted Montgomery "to produce and own (the album) as his retirement package for all his years of service and friendship to Mr. Jones," according to the lawsuit. The album was eventually shelved as Jones entered into several different recording contracts delaying its release.

As the producer, Montgomery maintained possession of the original mixed version of the album, but the master tapes were kept in the vault at Doc's Place Recording Studios in Nashville. Despite several attempts to work out a deal with CBS and then Sony Records, the long-lost album "George Jones & the Smoky Mountain Boys" was not released.

Subsequent to his death, Jones’s widow Nancy Jones entered into an agreement to sell his intellectual property and other assets to Concord, which owns Rounder Records, for a reported $30 million. In 2017, Concord entered into an agreement to release "George Jones & the Smoky Mountain Boys" through Cracker Barrel. The album is also on streaming services, including Spotify. "The release further misrepresents the album as lost recordings which were discovered, when in fact recordings were converted by defendant Nancy Jones and ultimately the Concord defendants with full knowledge of (Montgomery's) ownership," the lawsuit states.

Even though Montgomery produced the original recordings, he was allegedly not paid for his work or listed in the album's liner notes. Instead, two other executives, who added other musical elements to the version that was ultimately released, were credited as executive producer and project supervisor. The complaint, filed in federal court in Nashville, can be viewed here

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