Work Requirement

Council of Economic Advisers Releases Report on Work Requirements for Social Programs

The Council of Economic Advisers recently released a report titled "Expanding Work Requirements in Non-Cash Welfare Programs," that addresses controversial work requirement issues according to a Whitehouse press release. In April, President Trump signed an executive order giving states more autonomy over their Medicaid programs, allowing them to request waivers to add stipulations such as work requirements. Kentucky was the first state to try and implement work requirements for Medicaid recipients, however, a federal judge vacated the approval, sending the state’s program back to the federal Department of Health and Human Services for further review. So far, four states' applications have been approved by the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services: Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky and New Hampshire, while seven other states have applications pending: Arizona, Kansas, Maine, Mississippi, Utah, Ohio and Wisconsin. You can read the full report here.

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Several States to Issue Waivers on Work Requirements for Medicaid Recipients

As more states impose mandatory work requirements on their Medicaid programs, some have come under fire for policies that would protect many rural residents from the impact of the new rules, Business Insider reports. In Kentucky, Michigan and Ohio, the waiver proposals would exempt the counties with the highest unemployment rates, which critics argue skew towards white, GOP-leaning residents. Some health law experts say the waivers — already approved for Kentucky, pending for Ohio, and advancing in Michigan — may violate Title 6 of Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits race-based discrimination in federal assistance programs. The waiver in Kentucky, the first state to approve the work requirements, will exempt eight counties where the percentage of white residents is over 90 percent. Tennessee's work requirement bill for TennCare recipients, HB1551/SB1728, was signed into law on May 3.

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